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Hanif Kureishi
Bart J. Moore-Gilbert
0719055342
January 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
This comprehensive critical study of Hanif Kureishi details the writer's career to date. Kureishi has explored a number of key social and cultural issues of recent years, including the legacies of colonialism, the paradoxes of multi-culturalism, changing conceptions of class, gender and sexuality, globalization, and relations between popular culture and the canon. Bart Moore-Gilbert's authoritative text places Kureishi's writing in its historical, social, cultural, and critical contexts, and provides detailed readings of his major works.


London Kills Me
Hanif Kureishi
0140168311
Apr 1992
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This collection contains Kureishi's original shooting scripts for two films directed by Stephen Frears, My Beautiful Laundrette (1985) and Sammy and Rosie Get Laid (1987), plus the screenplay for London Kills Me , Kureishi's forthcoming directorial debut. Laundrette is a wry tale of romance between two men, one a skinhead and the other an Asian entrepreneur; Sammy and Rosie is the tragicomic odyssey of an Islamic despot in London; and London is an unsentimental slice of life about a homeless young drug dealer. Kureishi, a Londoner of English and Pakistani descent, is a hip, daring dramatist and a persuasive advocate of the progressive social agenda. Few screenplay collections are as worthy of reading as this one. Also included are essays about the making and marketing of Sammy and Rosie and London , plus an...


Gabriel's Gift
Hanif Kureishi
0641510063

Hardcover
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Hanif Kureishi: Postcolonial Storyteller
Kenneth C. Kaleta
0292743335
January 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
"Hanif Kureishi is a proper Englishman. Almost." So observes biographer Kenneth Kaleta. Well known for his films My Beautiful Laundrette and Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, the Anglo-Asian screenwriter, essayist, and novelist has become one of the leading portrayers of Britain's multicultural society. His work raises important questions of personal and national identity as it probes the experience of growing up in one culture with roots in another, very different one. This book is the first critical biography of Hanif Kureishi. Kenneth Kaleta interviewed Kureishi over several years and enjoyed unlimited access to all of his working papers, journals, and personal files. From this rich cache of material, he opens a fascinating window onto Kureishi's creative process, tracing such works as My Beautiful Laundrette, Sammy and...


The Buddha of Suburbia
Hanif Kureishi
014013168X
April 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
There's quite a bit of activity in Buddha of Suburbia. A bureaucrat becomes a suburban guru who marries a follower with a son who's a punk rocker named Charlie Hero. Consequently, the guru's son is propelled from his bland life into a series of erotic experiences in London. All the while, Hanif Kureishi keeps the tone lively with wry wit. On the description of suburban life: "We were proud of never learning anything except the names of footballers, the personnel of rock groups and the lyrics to 'I Am the Walrus.'" He also bends cultures, classes and genders while blasting the racism of British life in this 1990 Whitbread Prize winner.

From Publishers Weekly
Karim Amir, bored with his suburban lifestyle in England, is propelled into the fast lane and introduced to...


The Black Album
Hanif Kureishi
0684825406
Oct 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Oscar-nominated screenwriter Kureishi's second novel is a multicultural coming-of-age tale. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Kureishi's first novel, The Buddha of Suburbia (LJ 3/15/90), won England's Whitbread Prize; he is also famous for writing the screenplay of the film My Beautiful Laundrette (Faber & Faber, 1986). This, his second novel, is a portrait of Shahid Hasan, a young Pakistani student torn between a love affair with his college professor, DeeDee Osgood, and his political work with Islamics fighting racism. Kureishi portrays a bleak, drug-infested world full of offbeat sexual encounters. But like the student he depicts, he asks many questions: Can anywhere really be home for an immigrant living between two cultures? Should...


Hanif Kureishi (Readers' Guides to Essential Criticism Series)
Susie Thomas (Editor)
1403920567
April 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Hanif Kureishi is one of the most exciting and controversial British writers who has produced significant work in a range of forms: plays, essays, novels, short stories and film. This Guide introduces and sets in context the key debates about his work, and discusses his writing in relation to such issues as gender, postcolonial theory and British identity today. By exploring Kureishi's own statements and a wide range of critical perspectives, the Guide provides a comprehensive resource for the study of one of the most important critical figures in contemporary culture.


Hanif Kureishi (Readers' Guides to Essential Criticism Series)
Susie Thomas (Editor)
1403920575
April 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Hanif Kureishi is one of the most exciting and controversial British writers who has produced significant work in a range of forms: plays, essays, novels, short stories and film. This Guide introduces and sets in context the key debates about his work, and discusses his writing in relation to such issues as gender, postcolonial theory and British identity today. By exploring Kureishi's own statements and a wide range of critical perspectives, the Guide provides a comprehensive resource for the study of one of the most important critical figures in contemporary culture.


Love in a Blue Time
Hanif Kureishi
068484818X
Mar 1999
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This collection of ten short stories by the author of the highly acclaimed My Beautiful Laundrette and other screenplays shares a common theme: a non-Westerner's sense of alienation from mainstream Western society. In some, the characters are Pakistani immigrants enduring subtle or overt racism in lower-class London. Most often, however, the narrator is a moderately successful writer living in London who indulges in drugs, meaningless sex, and exploitative relationships. Kureishi seems to extend his range in one story by getting inside the character of a streetwise young woman who goes to Pakistan to visit her wealthy father, yet the narrator turns out to be that same male persona manipulating the character. Even when touched by success, the characters are morally hollow and treat each other to petty cruelties and...


Hanif Kureishi's the Buddha of Suburbia: A Reader's Guide
Nahem Yousaf
0826453244
June 2002
Paperback
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The Times Higher Education Supplement, May 31, 2002
"…invaluable for gathering out-of-the-way or ephemeral comment from TV and radio interviews…the web…[and] literary reviews."

Book Description
This is part of a new series of guides to contemporary novels. The aim of the series is to give readers accessible and informative introductions to some of the most popular, most acclaimed and most influential novels of recent years – from ‘The Remains of the Day’ to ‘White Teeth’. A team of contemporary fiction scholars from both sides of the Atlantic has been assembled to provide a thorough and readable analysis of each of the novels in question.

See all Editorial Reviews


Using the Master's Tools: Resistance and the Literature of the African and South Asian Diasporas
Anuradha Dingwaney Dingwan Needham
0312225423
May 2000
Hardcover
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Review
"Needham... contributes insights and arguments that are genuinely new. Striking a rare balance between theory and detailed criticism of literary texts..."


Hanif Kureishi
B. J. Moore-Gilbert
0719055350
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Review
"The book is rich in detail, observations, and ideas, and has a lot of reading and work behind it."--Bruce King, World Literature Today


Postethnic Narrative Criticism: Magicorealism in Oscar Zeta Acosta, Ana Castillo, Julie Dash, Hanif Kureishi, and Salman Rushdie
Frederick Luis Aldama
0292705166
May 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
"In this exciting new book, Frederick Luis Aldama has done an outstanding job of remapping 'magical realism.'" --Werner Sollors, Henry B. and Anne M. Cabot Professor of English Literature and Professor of Afro-American Studies, Harvard University Magical realism has become almost synonymous with Latin American fiction, but this way of representing the layered and often contradictory reality of the topsy-turvy, late-capitalist, globalizing world finds equally vivid expression in U.S. multiethnic and British postcolonial literature and film. Writers and filmmakers such as Oscar "Zeta" Acosta, Ana Castillo, Julie Dash, Hanif Kureishi, and Salman Rushdie have made brilliant use of magical realism to articulate the trauma of dislocation and the legacies of colonialism that people of color experience in the postcolonial,...


Gabriel's Gift
Hanif Kureishi
0743217136
Oct 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In 2001, Kureishi set teacups rattling in England with Intimacy, a sexually explicit novella about an extramarital affair, with possible real-life parallels. Here he concocts an appealing, deceptively breezy coming-of-age story recalling his screenplays (My Beautiful Laundrette; Sammy and Rosie Get Laid) in its tender evocation of London-area grunge. Since Mum banished Dad three months ago, 15-year-old Gabriel Bunch has been on the equivalent of house arrest. Nannied to death by hairy Hannah, a refugee from the Communist town of "Bronchitis," Gabriel copes by smoking pot, talking to his dead twin brother, Archie, and drawing objects that disturbingly come to life. Then his dad, Rex, a '60s-era guitarist now wallowing in a squalid bedsit, gets a call from Lester Jones, a David Bowie-like rock god who still packs...


The Body
Hanif Kureishi
0743249046
February 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
At once intriguing and preposterous, Kureishi's slender new novel starts off promisingly. Adam, the narrator, a famous writer in his 60s, is approached at a party by an attractive and mysterious young man named Ralph. Ralph claims to be an old man whose brain has been transplanted into a new, younger body. The bodies come from dead young people, whose deaths seem eerily convenient for those who want to become "Newbodies." At first Adam does not believe the story. But Ralph's entreaties are so convincing-and appealing-that Adam agrees to temporarily transplant his brain into the body of a man of 25. After all, "Who hasn't asked: Why can't I be someone else? Who, really, wouldn't want to live again, given the chance?" The science behind the idea is vague and silly, but Kureishi probably never meant it to be...


Intimacy and Midnight All Day
Hanif Kureishi
0743217144
Oct 2001
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Gabriel's Gift is lighter entertainment, for though it concentrates on a fractured family, the reader knows throughout that it is only a matter of time before all will be reconciled. This is very much a comfy chair of a book, with colorful, witty characters enduring only minor shakeups in their lives before resuming their previous paths. There's Rex, an ex-glam rock star, now underemployed and recently evicted from the house by Christine, who's had enough of Rex's inactivity and worries about his impact on their son, Gabriel. Gabriel has a bear of a nanny to watch him as well as a gift that allows him to create real things just by drawing them, though this twist curiously remains largely unexplored. Gabriel's love for his dad and mum, a little bit of serendipity, and some responsibility on Rex's part...

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