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City in Which I Love You
Li-Young Lee
0918526833
June 1990
Paperback
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From Library Journal
These "evocative, mysterious [poems] emphasize the immigrant sensibility." Lee may soon be one of our best poets.- emphasize the immigrant sensibility." Lee may soon be one of our best poets.Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
ContentsI.Furious VersionisII. The InterrogationThis Hour And What Is DeadArise, Go DownMy Father, In Heaven, Is Reading Out LoudFor A New Citizen Of These United StatesWith RuinsIII.This Room And Everything In ItThe City In Which I Love YouIV.The WaitingA StoryGoodnightYou Must SingHere I AmA Final ThingV.The Cleaving

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Henry Miller and James Laughlin
George Wickes
0393038645
Nov 1995
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
James Laughlin's heroic New Directions Press was the first and most consistent publisher of the often-censored Henry Miller from 1936 until 1991. This collection of 231 letters between Miller and Laughlin and Laughlin's successor and colleagues at the press documents a historically important writer-publisher relationship. New Directions introduced and championed "difficult" writers, among them Paul Bowles, Ezra Pound, Kenneth Patchen, D.H. Lawrence, Bertolt Brecht, and Pablo Neruda. Miller was associated with Laughlin and his press from the beginning, and the relationship revealed in the letters, aside from the fascinating exchanges about censorship, contracts, advances, royalties, permissions, and promotion, has much of the feel of family emotion. Editor Wickes's (English, Univ. of Oregon) introduction and notes...


Donkey Gospel: Poems
Tony Hoagland
1555972683
February 1998
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Hoagland's second book (after Sweet Ruin, Univ. of Wisconsin, 1992) is nothing if not imaginative. Invigorated by "fine distress," these graceful, perceptive poems gaze without blinking at what we hide from each other and ourselves when "head and heart/ are in different time zones." Concerned by broken bonds of love and "climaxes of suffering" in a "dying, burning world," he's also angry, at times startlingly, at "dividedness" of identity, which makes it impossible to remain connected in a "hated prison" of selfhood. With refreshing candor (one poem defends D.H. Lawrence, "who opened up the world"), Hoagland reveals what happens when giving and "tenderness" are blocked by a "mass of delusions" and "strange appetites." Acceptance of "joy and suffering made one at last" transforms what appear to be extravagant...


Beside the Shadblow Tree: A Memoir of James Laughlin
Hayden Carruth
1556590997
April 1999
Paperback
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From Booklist
James Laughlin (1914^-97) was an essential figure in twentieth-century literature, not because he was a major writer, though he was a very fine poet, but because New Directions books, which introduced several generations to the best in modern world literature, were "published for" him. That phrase was indicative of Laughlin, his friend, Carruth, imparts, for it skirted publicly acknowledging that he was New Directions' very active publisher-editor. Laughlin was extremely self-effacing, unwilling to show emotion or to endure gratitude. Yet he loved many women besides his three wives, and he was extraordinarily generous, not just with money. Near the end of this careful, thoroughly engaging memoir, as biographical of its author as of its subject, Carruth states his realization that Laughlin had supported him unobtrusively...


James Laughlin, New Directions Press, and the Remaking of Ezra Pound
Gregory Peter Barnhisel
1558494782
February 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Although James Laughlin (1914-1997) came from one of Pittsburgh's leading steel-making families, his passions were literary rather than industrial--he wanted to be a poet. Laughlin was a freshman at Harvard when he traveled to Rapallo, Italy, in 1933 to meet Ezra Pound (1885–1972), and he returned the following year to enroll in the poet's "Ezuversity." Pound dismissed Laughlin's poetic talents, advising the wealthy young man to make himself over into a publisher. Laughlin did just that, founding New Directions Press in 1936. For much of the 1930s prior to World War II, Laughlin and Pound were friends, business associates, collaborators, student and teacher, and even at times son and surrogate father. But Laughlin's investment in Pound--and their friendship--was severely tested by Pound's wartime propaganda...


Shakespeare and Company
Sylvia Beach
0803260970
Oct 1991
Paperback
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The Poetry of Ezra Pound
Hugh Kenner
0803277563
Jan 1985
Paperback
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Song: Poems
Brigit Pegeen Kelly
1880238136
February 1995
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Kelly has won some of the most prestigious awards available to poets, among them the Yale Series of Younger Poets award in 1988 for To the Place of Trumpets (LJ 5/15/88) and now the Lamont Award of the Academy of American Poets for her current volume. The title poem is an absolute gripper: a haunting story of the sacrificial mutilation of a child's pet goat that finally attains an arresting, spellbinding, ghostly immortality. This opening poem is a hard act to follow, but Kelly keeps the interest high. Descriptions are vivid and indelible as Kelly skillfully captures the elusive nature of sights, sounds, odors, and taste ("The window opens. The smell and even taste of wetted dirt and wild fruit steps/Up"). A strong thread of spirituality is woven into almost all the poems, which move from reflections on a flock of...


Byways: A Memoir
James Laughlin
0811215989
February 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Like his life, Laughlin's memoir is a bold demonstration of good literary ethics. The scion of Pittsburgh steel men, Laughlin founded America's greatest avant-garde press at the behest of Ezra Pound. New Directions brought immortals like Nabokov, Borges and Sartre to the States while sustaining domestic treasures such as William Carlos Williams and Henry Miller. And all the while, Laughlin's gentlemanly manners-a sporting worldliness and a casual erudition-led to proliferating contacts. Although written in verse, his memoir is so plainspoken it can be read as prose. As a writer, he seems simply happy that "It's / All down on my yellow pad." In fact, the book is an incomplete project, neatly edited by Glassgold, but it nonetheless covers most of Laughlin's life-from ancestors through Harvard and youthful travels...


New Directions 22
James Laughlin
0811203336
Dec 1970
Hardcover
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New Directions in Prose and Poetry
James Laughlin
0811204855
Dec 1973
Paperback
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Byways: A Memoir
James Laughlin
0811216179
February 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Like his life, Laughlin's memoir is a bold demonstration of good literary ethics. The scion of Pittsburgh steel men, Laughlin founded America's greatest avant-garde press at the behest of Ezra Pound. New Directions brought immortals like Nabokov, Borges and Sartre to the States while sustaining domestic treasures such as William Carlos Williams and Henry Miller. And all the while, Laughlin's gentlemanly manners-a sporting worldliness and a casual erudition-led to proliferating contacts. Although written in verse, his memoir is so plainspoken it can be read as prose. As a writer, he seems simply happy that "It's / All down on my yellow pad." In fact, the book is an incomplete project, neatly edited by Glassgold, but it nonetheless covers most of Laughlin's life-from ancestors through Harvard and youthful travels...


Collected Poems of James Laughlin
James Laughlin
1559211288
March 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Laughlin, the distinguished publisher of New Directions, has spent a lifetime in literature. Following the advice of Ezra Pound, who suggested publishing as a career, he has seen into print such giants of modernism as Pound and William Carlos Williams. Along the way, he has written poetry, much of it touched by Pound's technique of mingling English verse with foreign languages, ancient and modern. Perhaps because of this, Laughlin's poetry did not grow far beyond a core of love poems marked by their conventionality and an assortment of verses written, so it seems, as daily sketches by an interested amateur. But successful work also emerges here: poems reminiscent of Cavafy ("I Saw Her First"); poems that presage the work of American surrealists like James Tate ("Busy Day"); work from Report On a Visit to Germany...


New Directions in Prose and Poetry
James Laughlin
0811205258
Dec 1974
Hardcover
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Thomas Merton and James Laughlin
Thomas Merton
0393040690
June 1997
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
New Directions, an enterprise created by Laughlin, has served as the publishing house for many seminal figures in 20th-century literature. This usefully and unobtrusively footnoted volume, edited by Cooper (American thought and language, Michigan State Univ.), brings together the most representative of the extant correspondence between Laughlin and his author Thomas Merton. As an addition to Merton's growing body of work (most recently, Dancing in the Water of Life, LJ 6/1/97, Volume 5 of his journals), it offers a cogent perspective on Merton the writer. The development of his thought and his grappling with the thorny questions of what are appropriate avenues for exploration while remaining true to his vocation all add further dimension to our understanding of this very complex and irrepressible figure. While the...


New Directions in Prose and Poetry
James Laughlin
0811205398
Dec 1974
Hardcover
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Kenneth Rexroth and James Laughlin: Selected Letters
Kenneth Rexroth
0393029395
April 1991
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"You are becoming . . . a counter-revolutionary publisher," poet-essayist Kenneth Rexroth blasted his friend and publisher James Laughlin. "You are neurotic as hell," Laughlin, head of New Directions, wrote to the tantrum-prone muse of San Francisco's literary renaissance of the 1960s. Despite deadly cutting remarks, their relationship lasted from the 1930s to Rexroth's death in 1982. A flow of literary tabletalk, their correspondence is most interesting for Rexroth's lacerating comments on certain writers: Ezra Pound ("too much plain eccentricity"), Robert Penn Warren ("extremely derivative . . . and derivative from very bad exemplars"), Pablo Neruda ("literary Stalinism") and many others. Rexroth also records his meetings with Dylan Thomas and Henry Miller, bemoans his penuriousness and literary obscurity, and...


New Directions in Prose and Poetry
James Laughlin
0811207625
Apr 1980
Hardcover
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