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Tales of the City
Armistead Maupin
0060964049
October 1989
Paperback
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Amazon.com
Since 1976, Maupin's Tales of the City has etched itself upon the hearts and minds of its readers, both straight and gay. From a groundbreaking newspaper serial in the San Francisco Chronicle to a bestselling novel to a critically acclaimed PBS series, Tales (all six of them) contains the universe--if not in a grain of sand, then in one apartment house.

From Publishers Weekly
Maupin's alternately playful and sentimental tales depict an all-too-easily satirized population of transients and toffs living in and around San Francisco. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews


28 Barbary Lane
Armistead Maupin
0060164662
Sept 1990
Hardcover
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Book Description
"These novels are as difficult to put down as a dish of pistachios. The reader starts playing the old childhood game of 'Just one more chapter and I'll turn out the lights,' only to look up and discover it's after midnight." -- Charles Solomon, Los Angeles Times Book Review Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels--the first three of which are collected in the is omnibus edition--have earned a unique niche in American literature, not only as matchless entertainment, but as indelible documents of cultural change in the seventies and eighties. When originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle, Tales of the City (1978), More Tales of the City (1980) and Futher Tales of the City (1982) afforded a mainstream audience of millions its first exposure to straight and gay...


Night Listener
Armistead Maupin
006093090X
July 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
Many years ago, when the first volume of Tales of the City was going to press, Christopher Isherwood compared its author's narrative gifts to those of Charles Dickens. This has proven to be the blurb of a lifetime, an ever-renewable currency appearing on almost all of Armistead Maupin's subsequent books. Yet it has held up well--Dickens's gentle satire and broad good humor live on in Maupin more than in any other English-speaking writer. The Night Listener is his most ambitious work to date. While not strictly autobiographical, the story does teasingly suggest correspondences to the author's own life in a way that will delight and frustrate his many fans. The main character, Gabriel Noone, is a professional storyteller who broadcasts roughly autobiographical sketches for a long-running PBS series, "Noone at Night," stories...


Back to Barbary Lane
Armistead Maupin
0060166495
Nov 1991
Hardcover
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Book Description
"An old fashioned pleasure... there's been nothing like it since the heyday of the serial novel 100 years ago... Tearing through [the tales] one after the other, as I did, allows instant gratification; it also lets you appreciate how masterfully they're constructed. No matter what Maupin writes next, he can look back on the rare achievement of having built a little world and made it run." --Walter Kendrick, Village Voice Literary Supplement By turns hilarious and heartbreaking, Armistead Maupin's bestselling Tales of the City series stands as an incomparable blend of great storytelling and incisive social commentary. These six classic comedies, some of which originally appeared as serials in San Francisco newspapers, have won Maupin critical acclaim around the world and enthralled legions of devoted fans....


More Tales of the City (Tales of the City #2)
Armistead Maupin
0060929383
April 1998
Paperback
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--New York Times Book Review
"An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco."

--Publishers Weekly
"Sparkling entertainments...lit by a glowing humanity that brings each character to vivid, poignant life."

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The Essential Clive Barker
Clive Barker
0060195290
Dec 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
This 567-page sampler of Clive Barker's darkly fantastic work has an unusual format. You'd expect a huge collection of his macabre short stories (like the three 1984 Books of Blood that made his name in horror), or perhaps an omnibus of the sinisterly exotic novels in which he moved from Grand Guignol to his own warped brand of epic fantasy. Instead, here's a book of bits: 70-odd passages from novels and plays, plus four complete stories and an introduction in which our author offers glimpses of what makes him tick. The Essential Clive Barker is thematically arranged in 13 sections, each with its own brief prologue: "Doorways," "Journeys," "Visions and Dreams," "Lives," and so on. Some of these fragments are powerful and evocative, some numinous, some horrid; many are teasers to make you wonder what comes next. Reading this...


Further Tales of the City (Tales of the City #3)
Armistead Maupin
0641510055

Paperback
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Babycakes
Armistead Maupin
0060924837
January 1994
Paperback
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Book Description
"An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco."
--New York Times Book Review

When an ordinary househusband and his ambitious wife decide to start a family, they discover there's more to making a baby then meets the eye. Help arrives in the form of a grieving gay neighbor, a visiting monarch, and the dashing young lieutenant who defects from her yacht. Bittersweet and profoundly affecting, Babycakes was the first work of fiction to acknowledge the arrival of AIDS. "Armistead is a true original. His tales are bang up-to-date. They will surprise and maybe even shock you, but, I promise, they will make you laugh."--Ian McKellen "Maupin has a genius for observation. His characters have the timing of vaudeville comics, flawed by human frailty and fueled by blind hop." --Denver Post "Armistead...



44 Scotland Street
Alexander McCall Smith
1400079446
June 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Like Smith's bestselling Botswana mysteries, this book—comprising 110 sections, originally serialized in the Scotsman, that drolly chronicle the lives of residents in an Edinburgh boarding house—is episodic, amusing and peopled with characters both endearing and benignly problematic. Pat, 21, is on her second "gap year" (her first yearlong break from her studies was such a flop she refuses to discuss it), employed at a minor art gallery and newly settled at the eponymous address, where she admires vain flatmate Bruce and befriends neighbor Domenica. A low-level mystery develops about a possibly valuable painting that Pat discovers, proceeds to lose and then finds in the unlikely possession of Ian Rankin, whose bestselling mysteries celebrate the dark side of Edinburgh just as Smith's...


Significant Others
Armistead Maupin
0060924810
January 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Readers familiar with Maupin's Tales of the City series will greet this latest installment like a welcome visit from old friends. Once again, the action focuses on the misadventures of a cross-section of San Franciscans, who this time take to the country for a late summer weekend in three separate gender-segregated retreats: a gay resort, a lesbian music festival and the infamous encampment of privilege at Bohemian Grove. While the trio of settings couldn't be farther apart in spiritat least on the surfacethey all are within shouting distance of each other on the banks of the Russian River, and the three worlds, inevitably, collide. With its blend of satire, slapstick and melodrama, the novel, which originated as a newspaper serial, is as light as a souffle, although the very real threat of AIDSwhich has claimed...


Sure of You
Armistead Maupin
0060924845
January 1994
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The author's six-novel chronicle of gay, straight, single and married life in San Francisco, which began with Tales of the City , comes to a clever, wistful conclusion here. PW praised Maupin's "unerring ability to capture the exact tone of smart urban conversation." Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
This sixth, and final, volume of the Tales of the City series finds the now-former residents of 28 Barbary Lane dealing with the late '80s. Michael, after finally finding love with Thack, now must cope with being HIV-positive. Mary Ann's success as a talk-show host puts a fatal strain upon her marriage to Brian. Mona, with Mrs. Madrigal, vacations on the island of...


Further Tales of the City
Armistead Maupin
0060924926
Jan 1994
Paperback
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New York Times Book Review
"An extended love letter to a magical San Francisco."

Stephen McCauley
"Armistead Maupin is a first rate-world-class novelist, creating characters so vivid, complicated, tender, and true as to seem utterly timeless. . . .I'm willing to bet that fifty years from now Maupin's work will be read for its detailed descriptions of late twentieth century America, its rollicking humor and kind heart, its Chekovian compassion, its Wildean wit, its intricate. . .sometimes unbelievablle but always utterly irresistible plotlines."

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Maybe the Moon
Armistead Maupin
0060924349
August 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Though narrator Cadence Roth is only 31 inches tall, her impact on the reader's emotions is enormous. BOMC alternate in cloth. Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Cadence Roth is a heroine one will not soon forget. All of 31 inches tall, Cady played Mr. Woods, an E.T.-like character, in a hit movie a decade ago. Now 30 years old, she performs at birthday parties and bat mitzvahs, on the fringe of an industry that doesn't have much need for chubby dwarfs. In a strong and witty voice, Cady records daily life with her dizzy, star-struck roommate Renee, the physical challenge of turning on a shower, discrimination by people, and harassment by dogs. She begins a charming romance with a tall, handsome pianist and then, with her best friend,...


44 Scotland Street
Alexander McCall Smith
1419333828
June 2005
Audio
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Like Smith's bestselling Botswana mysteries, this book—comprising 110 sections, originally serialized in the Scotsman, that drolly chronicle the lives of residents in an Edinburgh boarding house—is episodic, amusing and peopled with characters both endearing and benignly problematic. Pat, 21, is on her second "gap year" (her first yearlong break from her studies was such a flop she refuses to discuss it), employed at a minor art gallery and newly settled at the eponymous address, where she admires vain flatmate Bruce and befriends neighbor Domenica. A low-level mystery develops about a possibly valuable painting that Pat discovers, proceeds to lose and then finds in the unlikely possession of Ian Rankin, whose bestselling mysteries celebrate the dark side of Edinburgh just as Smith's...

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