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Summer Doorways: A Memoir
W. S. Merwin
1593760728
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In 34 brief, dreamy chapters, esteemed American poet and translator Merwin meanders back to the late 1940s and early 1950s summers of his youth and inexperience. At age 16, he was blessedly released from the watchful protection of his stern Presbyterian father in Scranton, Pa., to attend Princeton, when the university was bereft of young men serving in WWII. Through a Princeton acquaintance, Alain Prévost (son of French writer Jean Prévost), the impressionable young Merwin secured the position of tutor to Prévost's friend Alan Stuyvesant's nephew, Peter, and spent an idyllic summer at the eminent family's bucolic home, Deer Park, in Hackettstown, N.J. Over two summers with Alan's aristocratic family, first at Deer Park, then in St. Jean Cap-Ferrat, France, near Nice, the fledgling writer...


Twenty Love Poems
Pablo Neruda
0140186484
Feb 1993
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This collection of poems, first published by Neruda at the age of 19 in 1924, caused something of a scandal because of its frank and intense sexuality: "I have gone marking the atlas of your body / with crosses of fire. / My mouth went across: a spider, trying to hide. / In you, behind you, timid, driven by thirst." It later became one of Neruda's best-loved works, selling two million copies by the 1960s. Why? With image after arresting image, Neruda charts the oceanic movements of passion, repeatedly summoning imagery of the sea and weather: "On all sides I see your waist of fog, / and your silence hunts down my afflicted hours; / my kisses anchor, and my moist desire nests / in you with your arms of transparent stone." As irresistible as the sea, love is engulfing ("You swallowed everything, like distance. / ....


Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair
Pablo Neruda
0142437700
December 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This collection of poems, first published by Neruda at the age of 19 in 1924, caused something of a scandal because of its frank and intense sexuality: "I have gone marking the atlas of your body / with crosses of fire. / My mouth went across: a spider, trying to hide. / In you, behind you, timid, driven by thirst." It later became one of Neruda's best-loved works, selling two million copies by the 1960s. Why? With image after arresting image, Neruda charts the oceanic movements of passion, repeatedly summoning imagery of the sea and weather: "On all sides I see your waist of fog, / and your silence hunts down my afflicted hours; / my kisses anchor, and my moist desire nests / in you with your arms of transparent stone." As irresistible as the sea, love is engulfing ("You swallowed everything, like distance. / ....


Understanding W.S. Merwin
H.L. L. Hix
1570031541
December 1997
Hardcover
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W.S. Merwin
Nelson
0252012771
Dec 1987
Hardcover
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W. S. Merwin
Harold Bloom (Editor)
0791078884
March 2004
Hardcover
·
 


Poetry as Labor and Privilege
Edward J. Brunner
0252017757
May 1991
Hardcover
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Migration: New and Selected Poems
W. S. Merwin
1556592183
April 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Mystical formalist, elegant romantic, Vietnam-era protester, translator, maker of sweet memoirs and uneasy dreamscapes, and ecological activist, Merwin has been so prominent for so long that it's hard to believe this rich selection represents the work of just one man. The earliest Merwin—a melancholy 1950s craftsman—gets the first 70 pages, including the bejeweled verse fairy tale "East of the Sun and West of the Sun." The haunting free verse of the next two decades includes the sad, urgent protest poems of The Lice (1967) and the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Carrier of Ladders (1970). Merwin's attraction to instinct and mystery drew his poems toward totemic, resonant images, in lines which imitated chants and prayers. The Rain in the Trees (1988) concerned the forests and coasts of Hawaii, where...


Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions
Maurice Manning
0300089961
July 2001
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Lawrence Booth is a vigorous, trash-talking, frustrating and entirely made-up young man from a rural South that's equal parts carnivorous nightmare, Freudian pastoral and deep-fried family romance. Manning, who hails from Kentucky, becomes the latest in the venerable Yale Younger Poets series (now judged by W.S. Merwin) with these sometimes over-the-top, often surprisingly difficult poems about Lawrence's boyhood and youth in a "sweet tobacco, cornmeal, archetypal world." Sonnets, catalogues, shaped poems and non sequitur-filled rambles consider Booth's "gradeschool days," his vivid nights, his television-viewing habits, his explorations on foot, his difficult sister and his comic attacks on his region's heritage. Manning also depicts Lawrence's companions the vicious, overwhelming father Mad Daddy; Red Dog, a...


Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: A New Verse Translation
W.S. Merwin (Translator)
0375709924
March 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Written down at least once in 1400 but probably composed earlier (and orally), this Middle English tale is rendered line-by-line, with the original en face, by the indefatigable Merwin. This approach allows the full flavor of the poem to come through as one goes back and forth between them: "Dele to me my destin‚, and do hit out of honde" becomes "Deal me my destiny, and do it out of hand." Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist
The first great story in English literature, Beowulf, is about fighting monsters--Grendel and his mother--and so is the next, the fourteenth-century poem Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. A gigantic green knight crashes Round Table festivities one Yuletide,...


Unframed Originals: Recollections
W. S. Merwin
1593760345
December 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
In this haunting, elegantly written memoir, W. S. Merwin recalls his youth, growing up in a repressed Presbyterian household in the small river towns of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The complex portrait of a family without language or history transforms the story of their isolated lives into the development of a writer's conscience and a warning about the fate of a middle class eager to obliterate origins. Unframed Originals brings the reader complex and intimate family portraits from an award-winning poet.


Lawrence Booth's Book of Visions
Maurice Manning
0300089988
July 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Lawrence Booth is a vigorous, trash-talking, frustrating and entirely made-up young man from a rural South that's equal parts carnivorous nightmare, Freudian pastoral and deep-fried family romance. Manning, who hails from Kentucky, becomes the latest in the venerable Yale Younger Poets series (now judged by W.S. Merwin) with these sometimes over-the-top, often surprisingly difficult poems about Lawrence's boyhood and youth in a "sweet tobacco, cornmeal, archetypal world." Sonnets, catalogues, shaped poems and non sequitur-filled rambles consider Booth's "gradeschool days," his vivid nights, his television-viewing habits, his explorations on foot, his difficult sister and his comic attacks on his region's heritage. Manning also depicts Lawrence's companions the vicious, overwhelming father Mad Daddy; Red Dog, a...


Walking Toward the Sun
Edward Weismiller
0300093586
Apr 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
When it was published in 1936, Edward Weismiller's The Deer Come Down made him, at 21, the youngest Yale Younger Poet ever published in the series, a distinction he retains to this day along with being the oldest living recipient of the prize. Walking Toward the Sun, introduced by series editor W.S. Merwin, is the George Washington University emeritus professor's fourth collection (along with a spy novel, The Serpent Sleeping). "Houses" finds "What I do not know is what I would shelter or do shelter, what houses I am, strange to my understanding, that will fall."Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
In 1936, twenty-year-old Edward Weismiller became the youngest poet to win the prestigious Yale Series of Younger Poets prize. Today, more than...


Present Company
W. S. Merwin
1556592272
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Merwin's 24th volume of poems is his first since last year's massive new-and-collected Migration: it may be the much-lauded poet's clearest and most unified in many years, and it is almost certainly his most moving. Following Kenneth Koch's New Addresses, its 101 poems address a person, place, object or abstraction ("To the Shadow," "To the Stone Paddock by the Far Barn"). Almost all seek, and many achieve, a deliberate pathos over the passage of time: "I will wait and you can follow alone," concludes Merwin (who won the 1970 Pulitzer Prize) in "To Lili's Walk," "and between us the night has come and gone." Often stark, at times nearly imageless, the poems recall particular moments in Merwin's own life, comment on the act of writing or introduce gentle humor. ("To the Consolations of Philosophy" begins "Thank you...


Famous Americans
Loren Goodman
0300100027
Apr 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
The Yale Series of Younger Poets is always worth investigating, and this year's winner is as surprising in its inventiveness as it is pleasing in its humor. Selected by W. S. Merwin, Goodman's hilarious debut collection contains a heady mix of pseudointellectual bombast, advertising hyperbole, and the sort of intuitively brilliant correlations found in folk art, such as the portrayal of Elvis as Jesus. Anyone who has ever worked with floundering students will find Goodman's takes on bad writing highly amusing, as are his forays into the minds of a piano-playing child and a Japanese caller struggling with English in a long answering-machine message. Form is content for Goodman, whether it's a letter, a giddily absurd report, strange and mangled voice-over commentary on such ludicrous topics as Einstein's brain and...


The West Side of Any Mountain: Place, Space, and Ecopoetry
J. Scott Bryson
087745955X
December 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“Scott Bryson's study of contemporary ecopoetry is a remarkably original and nourishing one. The comparisons between Berry and Harjo, Oliver and Merwin are especially illuminating, and the closing reflection on Thoreau is a knockout. The West Side of Any Mountain will have a lasting impact on my own reading and teaching of poetry.”--John Elder, author of Reading the Mountains of Home and The Frog Run

Book Description
In contrast to nature poets of the past who tended more toward the bucolic and pastoral, many contemporary nature poets are taking up radical environmental and ecological themes. In the last few years, interesting and evocative work that examines this poetry has begun to lay the foundation for studies in ecopoetics. Informed in general by current thinking in...


Famous Americans
Loren Goodman
0300100035
Apr 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
The Yale Series of Younger Poets is always worth investigating, and this year's winner is as surprising in its inventiveness as it is pleasing in its humor. Selected by W. S. Merwin, Goodman's hilarious debut collection contains a heady mix of pseudointellectual bombast, advertising hyperbole, and the sort of intuitively brilliant correlations found in folk art, such as the portrayal of Elvis as Jesus. Anyone who has ever worked with floundering students will find Goodman's takes on bad writing highly amusing, as are his forays into the minds of a piano-playing child and a Japanese caller struggling with English in a long answering-machine message. Form is content for Goodman, whether it's a letter, a giddily absurd report, strange and mangled voice-over commentary on such ludicrous topics as Einstein's brain and...


The Mays of Ventadorn
W. S. Merwin
0792265386
June 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Booklist
One of the finest senior U.S. poets stunningly evokes in prose the fabled romance and dark beauty of southwestern France. Seemingly channeling the troubadour spirit of the region, Merwin paints broad, but strikingly detailed, landscapes with his words, using language itself as a main character. He intermingles his personal experiences in the region with the songs of twelfth-century troubadours, illustrating superbly the flexibility of time in the historical cocoon of this ancient and endlessly resurrected locale. Often the prose sounds like poetry, and few other travel writings could aspire to the miraculously transporting quality of these crystalline sentences. The reader feels the restorative effects of this region and its poetry on Merwin, and cannot help but be touched. Like the songs of his troubadours, this little...

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