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Daisy Miller and Washington Square (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Henry James
1593081057
September 2004
Paperback
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Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anas Nin
Anais Nin
015640057X
October 1990
Paperback
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Book Description
This bestseller covers a single momentous year during Nin’s life in Paris, when she met Henry Miller and his wife, June. “Closer to what many sexually adventuresome women experience than almost anything I’ve ever read....I found it a very erotic book and profoundly liberating” (Alice Walker). The source of a major motion picture from Universal. Preface by Rupert Pole; Index.


A Literate Passion
Anais Nin
015652791X
Apr 1989
Paperback
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Tropic of Cancer
Henry Miller
0802131786
June 1987
Paperback
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Book Review
No punches are pulled in Henry Miller's most famous work. Still pretty rough going for even our jaded sensibilities, but Tropic of Cancer is an unforgettable novel of self-confession. Maybe the most honest book ever written, this autobiographical fiction about Miller's life as an expatriate American in Paris was deemed obscene and banned from publication in this country for years. When you read this, you see immediately how much modern writers owe Miller.

The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature
Autobiographical novel by Henry Miller, published in France in 1934 and, because of censorship, not published in the United States until 1961. Written in the tradition of Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau, it is a monologue about Miller's picaresque life as an impoverished...


Henry Miller, Happy Rock
Brassai
0226071391
Dec 2002
Hardcover
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Book Description
"In a world like this one, it's difficult to devote oneself to art body and soul. To get published, to get exhibited, to get produced often requires ten or twenty years of patient, intense labor. I spent half my life at it! And how do you survive during all that time? Beg? Live off other people until you're successful? What a dog's life! I know something about that! You're always recognized too late. And today, it's no longer enough to have talent, originality, to write a good or beautiful book. One must be inspired! Not only touch the public but create one's own public. Otherwise, you're headed straight for suicide."

That's Henry Miller's advice for young aspiring artists, as remembered by his very good friend Brassaï in this lively book. One of two that Brassaï wrote about the man who...


Daisy Miller
Henry James
0140432620
May 2003
Paperback
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From Library Journal
James's brief 1858 classic is here presented as a no-frills edition in Dover's Thrift series. Since the text is a staple in many high school and college literature curricula, Dover provides a painless, inexpensive way of stocking multiple copies.Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From AudioFile
Henry James's novella probes the social and emotional complications that follow the overly familiar but innocent behavior of Daisy Miller, a newly rich American traveling in Switzerland and Rome. This recording also includes the preface that James wrote later in life for his New York edition. Initially, the choice of a female reader might seem misguided for a story that is filtered through the consciousness of...


Conversations with Picasso
Brassai
0226071480
Dec 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
Henry Miller called Brassaï (born Gyula Halasz) "The Eye of Paris." As a photographer, journalist, and author of photographic monographs and literary criticism, he had an uncanny ability to capture the Paris art world of the mid-20th century. Conversations with Picasso, originally published in 1964, is a collection of Brassaï's memoirs, resurrected from scraps of paper he stored in a huge vase each night after his talks with the famous Spanish painter, whose work he photographed from 1932 to 1962. In keeping with the lively bohemian spirit that so characterized Pablo Picasso's milieu, Brassaï wrote these notes in a vivid, conversational style, and they are now vignettes, of a sort, from a theatrical time capsule. Presented alongside the actual photographs he took during his visits with Picasso, Brassaï's...


The Bhagavad Gita
Barbara Stoller Miller
0553213652
August 1986
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
The Bhagavad-Gita has been an essential text of Hindu culture in India since the time of its composition in the first century A.D. One of the great classics of world literature, it has inspired such diverse thinkers as Henry David Thoreau, Mahatma Gandhi, and T.S. Eliot; most recently, it formed the core of Peter Brook's celebrated production of the Mahabharata.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Frankenfood Myth
Henry I. Miller
0275978796
Aug 2004
Hardcover
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Review
“Miller and Conko present a timely treatise on how inappropriate and unscientific regulations are stifling biotechnology as it relates to the food industry. They argue that the costs of kowtowing to all current regulations have caused a potentially dangerous curtailment of new research at universities and small biotech businesses. Numerous examples are provided to show how the misinformed--press, responsible government agencies, and big business--have joined forces to limit, singularly, the use of genetic engineering to improve plant performance....An important book, well suited to university courses dealing with science history or policy, as well as to food policy makers. Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals.”–Choice
“The strength of this book is that the authors of...


Walden: 150th Anniversary Illustrated Edition of the American Classic
Henry David Thoreau
0618457178
August 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Henry David Thoreau was just a few days short of his twenty-eighth birthday when he built a cabin on the shore of Walden Pond and began one of the most famous experiments in living in American history. Originally he was not, apparently, intending to write a book about his life at the pond, but nine years later, in August of 1854, Houghton Mifflin's predecessor, Ticknor and Fields, published Walden; or, a Life in the Woods. At the time the book was largely ignored, and it took five years to sell out the first printing of two thousand copies. It was not until 1862, the year of Thoreau's death, that the book was brought back into print. Since then It has never been out of print. Published in hundreds of editions and translated into virtually every modern language, it has become one of the most widely read and influential...


News of Paris: American Journalists in the City of Light between the Wars
Ronald Weber
1566636760
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Weber offers an entertaining overview of expatriate journalists in Paris during the glory years, chronicling everything from deadline desperation to clandestine affairs. The New York Herald's Paris edition began in 1887, and as Paris became more American, the Paris Herald followed suit. Managing editor Eric Hawkins felt his paper was "an incubator for the most colorful, competent and sometimes crazy newspapermen that ever populated a city room." More "newsroom high jinks" took place at the competing Paris Tribune, and the two papers merged in 1934. Weber's scholarly skills (he's professor emeritus of American studies at Notre Dame) recapture that long-lost generation of writers, not just the usual suspects (Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Janet Flanner, Henry Miller) but a parade of foreign correspondents, culture...


Henry Miller and James Laughlin
George Wickes
0393038645
Nov 1995
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
James Laughlin's heroic New Directions Press was the first and most consistent publisher of the often-censored Henry Miller from 1936 until 1991. This collection of 231 letters between Miller and Laughlin and Laughlin's successor and colleagues at the press documents a historically important writer-publisher relationship. New Directions introduced and championed "difficult" writers, among them Paul Bowles, Ezra Pound, Kenneth Patchen, D.H. Lawrence, Bertolt Brecht, and Pablo Neruda. Miller was associated with Laughlin and his press from the beginning, and the relationship revealed in the letters, aside from the fascinating exchanges about censorship, contracts, advances, royalties, permissions, and promotion, has much of the feel of family emotion. Editor Wickes's (English, Univ. of Oregon) introduction and notes...


Henry Miller and Narrative Form
James M. Decker
0415360269
Nov 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
In this bold study James M. Decker responds to the common charge that Henry Miller's narratives suffer from "formlessness." He instead positions Miller as a stylistic pioneer, whose place must be assured in the American literary canon.

From Moloch to Nexus via such widely-read texts as Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, Decker examines what Miller calls his "spiral form," a radically digressive style that shifts wildly between realism and the fantastic. Decker draws on a variety of narratological and critical sources, as well as Miller's own aesthetic theories, in order to argue that this fragmented narrative style formed part of a sustained critique of modern spiritual decay. A deliberate move rather than a compositional weakness, then, Miller's style finds a wide variety of antecedents in...


Writers on Writing, Volume 2: More Collected Essays from The New York Times
Produced by The New York Times
064165572X

Hardcover
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Letters from Henry Miller to Hoki Tokuda Miller
Joyce Howard
0595002005
May 2000
Paperback
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Book Description

Henry Miller described himself as a confused, negligent, reckless, lusty, obscene, boisterous, thoughtful, scrupulous, lying, diabolically truthful man...filled with wisdom and nonsense.

These letters, penned by the controversial author of Tropic of Cancer, Tropic of Capricorn and Black Spring, represent Henry Miller's sexual and moral summing-up. They chart the infatuation, marriage and eventual disillusionment of Miller with his fifth wife Hoki Tokuda, a talented Japanese musician almost fifty years his junior. In its almost dangerous candor and its melancholy recognition of love's failure to sustain happiness, this volume deserves to be viewed as the culminating statement of Miller's interior life.

About the Author
Joyce Howard's editing is...



Tropic of Capricorn
Henry Miller
0802151825
June 1987
Paperback
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Book Description
Companion to Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer which shifts the scene from France to his life in the United States, covering his experience growing up in Brooklyn in the 1920s. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Sextet
Henry Miller
0714538442
Apr 1994
Paperback
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50 Greatest Love Letters of All Time
David H. Lowenherz
0517223333
January 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"The act of writing," proposes Lowenherz, "gives us a chance to reflect in private before exposing our heart." Hence the value of the love letter as an abiding expression of the writer's feelings in all their depth and complexity. A prominent collector and dealer in letters and historical memorabilia, Lowenherz presents letters (or fragments thereof) that collectively express the full range of amorous passion, from blind adoration to angst-ridden vituperation. Included are the romantic outpourings of celebrated writers George Sand, Virginia Woolf, Ernest Hemingway, Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald whose literary talents make their correspondence a model for any aspiring lover. Perhaps less gifted in their command of language, but certainly no less heartfelt, are selections from such notables as Harry Truman, Abigail...

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