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Dawn Powell
Marcelle Smith Rice
0805716025
Mar 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
American novelist, dramatist and short story writer known for her witty, sharp dialogue. This study builds on new critical groundwork and is the first in-depth study of Powell's literary career.


Time to Be Born
Dawn Powell
1883642418
September 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Here's one to savor when you're feeling sour--a reissue of a 1942 novel teeming with egregiously opportunistic, social-climbing Manhattanites who see WW II as just one more cause to manipulate and who are appalled not by Hitler's barbarism but by his mean birth and bad manners. The narcissistic queen bitch of the hour (who Gore Vidal purports is modeled casually on Clare Boothe Luce) is Amanda Keeler Evans: she snatches a newspaper baron from his wife; achieves monumental success as a romance novelist after hubby's papers print rave reviews of the ghost-written book; and, subsequently, pontificates on politics without expertise but to great acclaim. Amanda even finds a way to use newly arrived Vicky Haven, an old chum from her anonymous Ohio past. Unbeknownst to Vicky, she's to serve as beard for Amanda's affair...


Locusts Have No King
Dawn Powell
1883642426
December 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In the literary circles of Powell's (1897-1965) post-WW II Manhattan, "art is a cigarette ad," money and insincerity go hand-in-hand, a friend is an opportunity to talk about oneself,stet comma for clarity/pk and the word identifying what lovers do for each other is "punish." Frederick Olliver, a poor and introverted medievalist, loves Lyle Gaynor, married socialite and successful playwright. But each mistakes every offer of affection for malice, and eventually takes on the worst aspects of the other's character, reversing socioeconomic standing as well. This long-out-of-print novel, first published in 1948, displays Powell's ear for incriminating dialogue and gift for comic exaggeration, but her pacing is as inexorable as that of a factory, mass-producing ironic situations until the reader is no longer amused....


Turn, Magic Wheel
Dawn Powell
1883642728
January 1999
Paperback
·
 
Review
“A gleaming, brittle and slightly brutal New York novel
. . . each chapter slips us into the consciousness and conversations of a group of New Yorkers and keeps them afloat on the sounds and sensations, the dash, squalor and ugly beauty of the city.”
– Margo Jefferson, The New York Times (1994)

“Give us your lonely, your misunderstood, your sexually malcontent, your stubborn provincial dreams: responding to this siren call, Dawn Powell stayed loyal to New York with an ardor beside which that of celebrants like Scott Fitzgerald and E. B. White appear fickle.”
– John Updike, The New Yorker (1995)

Book Description
Dennis Orphen, in writing a novel, has stolen the life story of his friend, Effie Callingham, the former wife of a famous,...


Come Back to Sorrento
Dawn Powell
1883642264
June 1998
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Powell is definitely the comeback kid. Her novels were unavailable for years, but now every time one goes out of print, another publisher picks it up for reissue. This set runs the gamut of her career, with Come Back to Sorrento (originally published as The Tenth Moon) representing an early release (1932) and The Golden Spur, her last (LJ 9/15/62). The autobiographical Come Back is the third of Powell's "Ohio Novels" about small-town life, while Spur portrays the tainted, wise-cracking New Yorkers for whom she is known.Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED as The Tenth Moon, Come Back to Sorrento is the second of Powell’s "Ohio novels" to be re-issued in paperback. Here Powell turns her attention...


The Golden Spur
Dawn Powell
1883642272
June 1998
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Powell is definitely the comeback kid. Her novels were unavailable for years, but now every time one goes out of print, another publisher picks it up for reissue. This set runs the gamut of her career, with Come Back to Sorrento (originally published as The Tenth Moon) representing an early release (1932) and The Golden Spur, her last (LJ 9/15/62). The autobiographical Come Back is the third of Powell's "Ohio Novels" about small-town life, while Spur portrays the tainted, wise-cracking New Yorkers for whom she is known.Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
IF A YOUNG MAN finds his own father inconveniently ordinary, can he choose another? Jonathan Jaimison, the engagingly amoral hero, comes to New York from Silver City, Ohio for exactly such a...


My Home Is Far Away: An Autobiographical Novel
Dawn Powell
1883642434
October 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Dawn Powell was in the midst of writing one of her finest satires, A Time to Be Born, when she contracted a fever that brought childhood memories back so vividly that she stopped her novel and began scrawling reminiscences that were later collected in My Home Is Far Away. Although not true autobiography, the life of the main character, Marcia Willard, parallels Powell's life, including the death of her mother, life with a father who was on the road, and the traumatic remarriage of her father to a vicious and selfish woman. My Home Is Far Away is an excellent depiction of what childcare was like for motherless children in the 19th century in comparison to their family-oriented neighbors.

From Publishers Weekly
Originally published in 1944, this reissue of...


The Wicked Pavilion
Dawn Powell
1883642396
June 1998
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Originally published in 1940, 1942, and 1954, respectively, this trio were reprinted by Vintage (Classic Returns, LJ 5/1/90) and the now defunct Yarrow Press (Classic Returns, LJ 4/15/91) in the early 1990s, when Powell experienced a bit of a resurgence only to disappear again. Like many of her works, these satirize New York's pseudointellectual elite. Powell is one of American literature's most lethal wits?she could hold her own against Dorothy Parker any time?and should be in all library collections.Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review
“The Wicked Pavilion can justly be called the most accurate, the most penetrating, the most outrageously comic of all the hundreds of novels written about the Village.” – Ross Wetzsteon in his landmark...


Dawn Powell: Novels 1930-1942 (Library of America), Vol. 1
Dawn Powell
1931082014
September 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Powell was a noteworthy novelist of mid-20th-century America whose satirical observations and keen sense of the complexities of social relationships unfolded into a perceptive chronicle of the two milieus she knew so well the melancholy frustrations of small-town life in Ohio and the brutal sophistication of uptown Manhattan. She enjoyed a reputation in Greenwich Village literary circles for her wit, humor, compassion, and somewhat hedonistic lifestyle. And yet, despite a steady stream of publications throughout her career, she never achieved the popularity, critical acclaim, and financial security she so richly deserved and so desperately sought. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Page (Dawn Powell: A Biography, LJ 9/15/98), Powell's writings have been rescued from literary obscurity and added to the...


Dawn Powell: Novels 1944-1962 (Library of America), Vol. 2
Dawn Powell
1931082022
September 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Powell was a noteworthy novelist of mid-20th-century America whose satirical observations and keen sense of the complexities of social relationships unfolded into a perceptive chronicle of the two milieus she knew so well the melancholy frustrations of small-town life in Ohio and the brutal sophistication of uptown Manhattan. She enjoyed a reputation in Greenwich Village literary circles for her wit, humor, compassion, and somewhat hedonistic lifestyle. And yet, despite a steady stream of publications throughout her career, she never achieved the popularity, critical acclaim, and financial security she so richly deserved and so desperately sought. Thanks to the tireless efforts of Page (Dawn Powell: A Biography, LJ 9/15/98), Powell's writings have been rescued from literary obscurity and added to the...


The Diaries of Dawn Powell, 1931-1965
Dawn Powell
1883642256
October 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Dawn Powell has often been overlooked since her death at 67 in 1965, but her brilliant novels, such as Angels On Toast, A Time to Be Born and The Wicked Pavilion are returning to print. And to accompany her rediscovery, The Diaries of Dawn Powell: 1931-1965 presents a wondrous evocation of the writing life. More than mere diaries, Powell's journals are at times a workbook presenting many fully-formed narratives. There are thoughtful pieces about why she feels compelled to write and gripes about how writers live. And scattered throughout are witty and gossipy essays about living in literary New York and socializing and working with such characters as Edmund Wilson, John Dos Passos, her editor Max Perkins, and the woman to whom she was often unfairly compared,Dorothy Parker. --This text refers to an out of print or...


Four Plays by Dawn Powell
Dawn Powell
1883642612
October 1999
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Powell (1896-1965) was recognized for writing novels, diaries, and letters about her life as a small-town girl who came to the big city to achieve fame and wealth. But Powell also wrote ten plays, four of which are collected here. Only two of themABig Night and Jig SawAwere ever produced, and they are included here, along with Women at Four O'Clock and Walking Down Broadway. Many critics debunked Powell's writing for its feminist skewering of men and society. But, according to editors Sexton and Page, Powell's works encompass a larger cloud of human nature, showing all the mistakes we make just by getting out of bed in the morning. For instance, Big Night tells the tale of an advertising salesman on the verge of unemployment who has invited a potential client from Chicago to dinner. The version included here was...


Angels on Toast
Dawn Powell
188364240X
September 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Originally published in 1940, 1942, and 1954, respectively, this trio were reprinted by Vintage (Classic Returns, LJ 5/1/90) and the now defunct Yarrow Press (Classic Returns, LJ 4/15/91) in the early 1990s, when Powell experienced a bit of a resurgence only to disappear again. Like many of her works, these satirize New York's pseudointellectual elite. Powell is one of American literature's most lethal wits?she could hold her own against Dorothy Parker any time?and should be in all library collections.Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
EVERYONE IN Angels on Toast is on the make: Lou Donovan, the entrepeneur who ricochets frantically between his well-connected current wife, his disreputable ex, and his dangerously greedy mistress; Trina...


Sunday, Monday and Always: Stories by Dawn Powell
Dawn Powell
1883642604
September 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Published by Houghton Mifflin in 1952, this was Powell's own selection of her best short stories. It originally contained 18 stories, but this edition includes four additional pieces that haven't seen print in decades. Powell is always a great read. Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
IN ADDITION TO THE novels and the diaries that have won her posthumous acclaim, Dawn Powell wrote hundreds of short stories over the course of half a century. Sunday, Monday and Always, initially published in 1952, was the author's own personal selection of her best work in the form. This new, expanded edition of Sunday, Monday, and Always includes four additional short pieces written after the original collection was printed.
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