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Exercises in Style
Raymond Queneau
0811207897
January 1988
Paperback
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Book Review
A twentysomething bus rider with a long, skinny neck and a goofy hat accuses another passenger of trampling his feet; he then grabs an empty seat. Later, in a park, a friend encourages the same man to reorganize the buttons on his overcoat. In Raymond Queneau's Exercises in Style, this determinedly pointless scenario unfolds 99 times in twice as many pages. Originally published in 1947 (in French), these terse variations on a theme are a wry lesson in creativity. The story is told as an official letter, as a blurb for a novel, as a sonnet, and in "Opera English." It's told onomatopoetically, philosophically, telegraphically, and mathematically. The result, as translator Barbara Wright writes in her introduction, is "a profound exploration into the possibilities of language." I'd say it's a...


Zazie in the Metro
Raymond Queneau
0142180041
Oct 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Impish, foul-mouthed Zazie arrives in Paris from the country to stay with Gabriel, her female-impersonator uncle. All she really wants to do is ride the metro, but finding it shut because of a strike, Zazie looks for other means of amusement and is soon caught up in a comic adventure that becomes wilder and more manic by the minute. In 1960 Queneau's cult classic was made into a hugely successful film by Louis Malle. Packed full of word play and phonetic games, Zazie in the Metro remains as stylish and witty as ever.

Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: French

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99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style
Matt Madden
1596090782
October 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Retelling the same one-page comic 99 different ways sounds boring, but Madden, a leading proponent of the value of formalist exercises, demonstrates how well boundaries can drive creativity, inspired by the similar work of Raymond Queneau. A new discovery awaits the reader on every page. The basic scene is a nonstory about a man who forgets why he's looking in the refrigerator. In the variations, new elements are introduced and removed: different characters, more panels, fewer closeups, flashbacks, text-only or a focus on sound or color effects. Madden acknowledges the history of the medium with allusions to various genres and characters (including the Yellow Kid, Krazy Kat and Winsor McCay's Rarebit Fiend). Favorites include a how-to on building a comic, a palindromic story that reads the...


Bark Tree
Raymond Queneau
0714501085
Apr 2006
Paperback
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Rewriting Greece: Queneau and the Agony of Presence
Constantin Toloudis
0820424889
February 1995
Hardcover
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Introduction to the Reading of Hegel
Alexandre Kojeve
0801492033
Sept 1980
Paperback
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Flight of Icarus
Raymond Queneau
0811204839
October 1973
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Stories and Remarks
Raymond Queneau
0803238010
Aug 2000
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Surrealist author, Hegel commentator, mathematician, and Gallimard editor, Queneau (Zazie dans le M tro) not only worked in a variety of disciplines but wrote across the genre spectrum. These brief pieces were collected after his death in 1976 and published in France in 1981. They are expertly translated here, quite a feat given that his culture-specific writing is often impregnated with homophonic puns and other word puzzles. Arranged chronologically, they reach back to Queneau's youth and end with a piece published in 1973. Notes provide both context and publication history for each of the essays, tableaux, satires, and other brief but internally complete pieces gathered into this volume. Libraries serving scholars will, of course, want this, but so, too, will public libraries of all sizes, for it makes...


Stories and Remarks
Raymond Queneau
0803288522
Aug 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Surrealist author, Hegel commentator, mathematician, and Gallimard editor, Queneau (Zazie dans le M tro) not only worked in a variety of disciplines but wrote across the genre spectrum. These brief pieces were collected after his death in 1976 and published in France in 1981. They are expertly translated here, quite a feat given that his culture-specific writing is often impregnated with homophonic puns and other word puzzles. Arranged chronologically, they reach back to Queneau's youth and end with a piece published in 1973. Notes provide both context and publication history for each of the essays, tableaux, satires, and other brief but internally complete pieces gathered into this volume. Libraries serving scholars will, of course, want this, but so, too, will public libraries of all sizes, for it makes...


Last Days
Raymond Queneau
1564781402
August 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Parisian student life in the 1920s and Queneau's own intellectual maturation (he was a founding member of Oulipo) inspired this tale of three adults facing old age, three students doomed to military service and one philosopher/waiter central to their six destinies. PW called this "beguiling. . . . Queneau's literary infractions . . . are not for the sake of novelty but for the sake of the novel." Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
Among the last of Queneau's major works to be translated into English, this highly stylized novel draws upon the author's intimate journal (1920-28) for many details. Like the novel's main character, Queneau went to Paris from Normandy to...


Pierrot Mon AMI
Raymond Queneau
1564783979
March 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Pierrot is a Chaplinesque figure who works at a series of marginal jobs for an amusement park, and competes with his friend Paradis for the affections of the owner's daughter. "Originally published in France in 1942 and in England in 1950, this novel's pared down, often vulgar language is supplemented by highly inventive word plays and snippets of philosophy," said PW . Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Cityweek 8-8-88
"Loopily clever . . . inexhaustibly inventive, unremittingly disconcerting, overflowing with subversive energy, surrealistic wit, and rough-edged whimsy. . . . It is full of sentences which dizzy the reader with the hilarity of their close-packed variety of tone: low argot sabotages...


Sunday of Life
Raymond Queneau
0811206459
December 1977
Hardcover
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Language Notes
Text: English, French (translation)


We Always Treat Women Too Well (New York Review Books Classics)
Raymond Queneau
159017030X
January 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
We Always Treat Women Too Well was first published as a purported work of pulp fiction by one Sally Mara, but this novel by Raymond Queneau is a further manifestation of his sly, provocative, wonderfully wayward genius. Set in Dublin during the 1916 Easter rebellion, it tells of a nubile beauty who finds herself trapped in the central post office when it is seized by a group of rebels. But Gertie Girdle is no common pushover, and she quickly devises a coolly lascivious strategy by which, in very short order, she saves the day for king and country. Queneau's wickedly funny send-up of cheap smut—his response to a popular bodice-ripper of the 1940s—exposes the link between sexual fantasy and actual domination while celebrating the imagination's power to transmute crude sensationalism into pleasure pure...


Raymond Queneau, Carole Maso, Vol. 3
John O'Brien (Editor)
1564781771
October 1997
Hardcover
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The Blue Flowers
Raymond Queneau
0811209458
Apr 1985
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English, French (translation)


Odile
Raymond Queneau
0916583341
Jan 1989
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
One of the author's early works, this charming, semi-autobiographical novel was written before Queneau developed the highly intellectualized style that became his trademark. Like Queneau, who became involved with the Surrealists in the mid-'20s after military service in North Africa, the narrator, Roland Travy, joins a group headed by a flamboyant individual named Anglares (a disguised portrait of surrealist Andre Breton). Queneau takes deliciously funny stabs at his "fellow revolutionaries of the unconscious," describing their flirtation with communism and, ultimately, Travy's break with the group. In the meantime, Travy marries Odile, a sunny but flakey young woman from a similar bourgeois background, but their relationship is too bizarre even for the Surrealists. Written in a cool detached style, full of...


Manual of Saint Germain-des-Pres: Left Bank Paris in the Fifties
Boris Vian
0847826589
October 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
Rizzoli is pleased to present the first English-language translation of Manual of St-Germain-des-Près by beloved French author Boris Vian. Paris in the fifties was an incredible place and time: with the end of the war, everything seemed possible. Vian's book, a guided tour of the left bank cafés, galleries, underground jazz clubs, theaters, and apartment salons captures the transformative culture of the existentialist and post-surrealistic circles. The list of luminaries he ran with includes Simone de Beauvoir, Albert Camus, Jean Cocteau, Jean Genet, Alberto Giacometti, Juliette Greco, Raymond Queneau, Jacquês Prevert, Miles Davis, and, of course, Jean-Paul Sartre. Manual of St-Germain-des-Près is a chronicle of a period, a place, a circle, and a lifestyle, highlighted in this volume with...

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