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Muriel Rukeyser Reader
Muriel Rukeyser
0393313239
April 1995
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
It's easy to see from this collection, which spans 1935-76, why many regarded elements of Rukeyser's work as beyond or before her time. By combining and recombining images of political leaders, body memory, physicists, sexuality, and more, the poet created a personal dreamscape, a cinema verit{‚}e full of jump cuts intersplicing poets, painters, and philosophers that presaged the age of MTV and poetry videos. Underpinning the densely worked surfaces, however, are the poet's recurrent musings on how and why we live, our relationships to ourselves, our physical bodies, the laws of gravity, the nature of fear, and the evolution of the poetic image. In "Letter to the Front" (from Beast in View, 1944), Rukeyser encapsulates her view of life as a woman, a Jew, and an artist: "The gift is torment. Not alone the still...


How Shall We Tell Each Other of the Poet : The Life and Writing of Muriel Rukeyser
Anne F. Herzog (Editor)
0312213204
August 1999
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Even if Muriel Rukeyser never attained the status of Whitman or Dickinson, the poets Adrienne Rich compares her to in one of these essays, she was an American original. She was less a marquee poet than a force of nature, an imposing woman who gave herself to a variety of aesthetic positions, political causes, and passionate friendships and antagonisms. (Gerald Stern recalls being taunted by an audience member when he and Rukeyser read together once and starting to defend himself by saying, "I don't want to be mean," only to hear Rukeyser whisper, "Be mean, be mean.") Herzog and Kaufman, English professors at West Chester University and the University of Utah, respectively, gather writings by 37 Rukeyser fans; a number of these pieces are poems, the most luminous of which is Richard Howard's "A Sibyl of 1979," in...


How Shall We Tell Each Other of the Poet : The Life and Writing of Muriel Rukeyser
Anne F. Herzog (Editor)
0312238851
January 2001
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Even if Muriel Rukeyser never attained the status of Whitman or Dickinson, the poets Adrienne Rich compares her to in one of these essays, she was an American original. She was less a marquee poet than a force of nature, an imposing woman who gave herself to a variety of aesthetic positions, political causes, and passionate friendships and antagonisms. (Gerald Stern recalls being taunted by an audience member when he and Rukeyser read together once and starting to defend himself by saying, "I don't want to be mean," only to hear Rukeyser whisper, "Be mean, be mean.") Herzog and Kaufman, English professors at West Chester University and the University of Utah, respectively, gather writings by 37 Rukeyser fans; a number of these pieces are poems, the most luminous of which is Richard Howard's "A Sibyl of 1979," in...


Out of Silence
Muriel Rukeyser
0810150158
Nov 1994
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
During her lifetime, Rukeyser (1913-1980) was sometimes derided for affecting a "period mood," and this collection, based on the 1979 Collected Poems of Muriel Rukeyser , unfortunately reinforces that perception. Even with the early work ("Breathe-in experience, breathe-out poetry"), Rukeyser's poetics were unmediated by self-scrutiny, which would have allowed her to cut self-indulgent language. She has been praised as the strongest poet of her generation to represent the politics of the left, but some of the passages (such as the couplet comparing Plato's rings, Homer's chain of gold and Lenin's "cry of Dare We Win") appear politically naive at this distance from the turbulent times in which they were written. Although there are many fine cadences ("And in my body feel the seasons grow, / Who is it in the dim...


Muriel Rukeyser's The Book of the Dead
Tim Dayton
082621469X
June 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
The Book of the Dead by Muriel Rukeyser was published as part of her 1938 volume U.S. 1. The poem commemorates the worst industrial accident in U.S. history, the Gauley Tunnel tragedy. In this terrible disaster, an undetermined number of men died of acute silicosis after working on a tunnel project in Fayette County, West Virginia, in the early 1930s. After many years of relative neglect, The Book of the Dead has recently returned to print and has become the subject of critical attention. In Muriel Rukeyser's "The Book of the Dead," Tim Dayton continues that study by characterizing the literary and political world of Rukeyser at the time she wrote The Book of the Dead.

About the Author
Tim Dayton is Associate Professor of English at Kansas State University in Manhattan. ...


Muriel Rukeyser: Selected Poems
Muriel Rukeyser
1931082588
March 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Muriel Rukeyser (1913–80) published her first book—the powerfully experimental Theory of Flight—at age twenty-two, and went on to an adventurous and prolific career as poet, translator, and political activist. Her expansive energies sought a poetry in which politics, geography, sexuality, mythology, and autobiography could find fused and fluid expression. From her early, brilliantly cinematic "Poem Out of Childhood" through excerpts from her long wartime "Letter to the Front" to her late "Resurrection of the Right Side," written after her stroke, this selection represents the many sides and selves of a major poet.

About the Author
Adrienne Rich is the author of nearly twenty volumes of poetry and the recipient of a National Book Award.


The Collected Poems of Muriel Rukeyser
Muriel Rukeyser
082294247X
May 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
One of the most admired poets of the American left, Rukeyser (1914–1980) is in the midst of a revival: this enormous collection should help keep the spotlight on her work. Rukeyser's early poems (1935's Theory of Flight, 1938's U.S. 1) melded modernist surfaces with outspoken Popular Front politics. The best known (and best) of her many sequences, "The Book of the Dead" (1938), chronicles corporate negligence at a West Virginia construction project: "Almost as soon as work was begun in the tunnel/ men began to die among dry drills." As her star waned after the Second World War, she continued to enunciate bold hopes: "Let me tell you what I have known all along," she asked in 1949: "meaning of poetry and personal love,/ a world of peace and freedom." Later odes and longer poems praised Rukeyser's heroes,...


The Collected Poems of Muriel Rukeyser
Janet Kaufman (Editor)
0822959240
May 2006
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
One of the most admired poets of the American left, Rukeyser (1914–1980) is in the midst of a revival: this enormous collection should help keep the spotlight on her work. Rukeyser's early poems (1935's Theory of Flight, 1938's U.S. 1) melded modernist surfaces with outspoken Popular Front politics. The best known (and best) of her many sequences, "The Book of the Dead" (1938), chronicles corporate negligence at a West Virginia construction project: "Almost as soon as work was begun in the tunnel/ men began to die among dry drills." As her star waned after the Second World War, she continued to enunciate bold hopes: "Let me tell you what I have known all along," she asked in 1949: "meaning of poetry and personal love,/ a world of peace and freedom." Later odes and longer poems praised Rukeyser's heroes,...


Houdini, Vol. 1
Muriel Rukeyser
1930464045
April 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
A noted social and political activist and writer, Rukeyser (1913-80) is best known for her powerful poetry, e.g., Book of the Dead, which focuses on West Virginia coal miners dying of silicosis. Previously unpublished, this verse drama was performed once in 1973 at the Lenox Center for Performing Arts. Here, we see the great escape artist and his wife, Bess, fall in love, marry, and face fear and death together. In the play, Bess speaks one of Rukeyser's most famous lines, which has been adopted by the women's movement: "What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open." Rukeyser's poetic dialog and songs effectively contribute to the dreamlike quality of the play. An interesting addition to Houdini lore, this is recommended for large contemporary theater art...


The Orgy
Muriel Rukeyser
0963818325
July 1997
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Though receiving high praise from critics when initially published in 1965, this novel nonetheless soon went out of print. Set in Ireland's County Kerry during the pagan Puck Fair, the plot offers up large doses of human sexuality. This edition is based on the corrected text version that was published a few years after the original.Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
novelized memoir of the poet's Irish visit


Houdini, Vol. 1
Muriel Rukeyser
1930464053
August 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
A noted social and political activist and writer, Rukeyser (1913-80) is best known for her powerful poetry, e.g., Book of the Dead, which focuses on West Virginia coal miners dying of silicosis. Previously unpublished, this verse drama was performed once in 1973 at the Lenox Center for Performing Arts. Here, we see the great escape artist and his wife, Bess, fall in love, marry, and face fear and death together. In the play, Bess speaks one of Rukeyser's most famous lines, which has been adopted by the women's movement: "What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life? The world would split open." Rukeyser's poetic dialog and songs effectively contribute to the dreamlike quality of the play. An interesting addition to Houdini lore, this is recommended for large contemporary theater art...


Life of Poetry
Muriel Rukeyser
0963818333
September 1996
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In an era in which art is increasingly dictated by marketers, and publishers and filmmakers don't seem to make a move without first consulting focus groups, poetry might seem, at first, a bit superfluous. It's "difficult," for one thing, subject to many interpretations; it's also deeply personal, unsuited to creation by committee. So what possible use does the modern world have for poetry? Muriel Rukeyser answers this question in The Life of Poetry, a book that just keeps coming back in time for each new generation. First published in 1949, it was reissued in 1974 and returns to print again in 1997, courtesy of Paris Press. Rukeyser's presents many definitions of poetry: it is an exchange of energy, a record of the emotional meaning of every moment, a concentration of universal joys and sorrows. It is a thing...

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