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Shalimar the Clown
Salman Rushdie
0679463356
September 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. [Signature]Reviewed by William T. VollmannThe focus of this novel is extremism. It tells the tale of two Kashmiri villages whose inhabitants gradually get caught up in communal violence. As we know from Yugoslavia, hatred takes on especially horrific manifestations when neighbors turn against each other. The neighbors to whom Rushdie introduces us are memorable and emblematic characters, especially his protagonists, the Hindu dancer Boonyi Kaul and her childhood sweetheart, Shalimar the clown, son of a Muslim family. Their passion becomes a marriage solemnized by both Hindu and Muslim rites, but as conflict heats up, Boonyi seduces the American ambassador. The resulting transformation of Shalimar into a terrorist is easily the most impressive achievement of the book, and here one must...


Midnight's Children
Salman Rushdie
0140132708
January 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Anyone who has spent time in the developing world will know that one of Bombay's claims to fame is the enormous film industry that churns out hundreds of musical fantasies each year. The other, of course, is native son Salman Rushdie--less prolific, perhaps than Bollywood, but in his own way just as fantastical. Though Rushdie's novels lack the requisite six musical numbers that punctuate every Bombay talkie, they often share basic plot points with their cinematic counterparts. Take, for example, his 1980 Booker Prize-winning Midnight's Children: two children born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947--the moment at which India became an independent nation--are switched in the hospital. The infant scion of a wealthy Muslim family is sent to be raised in a Hindu tenement, while the legitimate heir to such squalor ends...


Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children
Norbert Schurer
082641575X
Oct 2004
Paperback
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Haroun and the Sea of Stories
Salman Rushdie
0140157379
November 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Immediately forget any preconceptions you may have about Salman Rushdie and the controversy that has swirled around his million-dollar head. You should instead know that he is one of the best contemporary writers of fables and parables, from any culture. Haroun and the Sea of Stories is a delightful tale about a storyteller who loses his skill and a struggle against mysterious forces attempting to block the seas of inspiration from which all stories are derived. Here's a representative passage about the sources and power of inspiration: So Iff the water genie told Haroun about the Ocean of the Stream of Stories, and even though he was full of a sense of hopelessness and failure the magic of the Ocean began to have an effect on Haroun. He looked into the water and saw that it was made up of a thousand thousand...


Fury
Salman Rushdie
0679783504
Aug 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
Fury is a gloss on fin-de-siècle angst from the master of the quintuple entendre. Salman Rushdie hauls his hero, Malik Solanka, from Bombay to London to New York, and finally to a fictional Third World country, all in order to show off a preternatural ability to riff on anything from Bollywood musicals to revolutionary politics. Professor Solanka is propelled on this path by his strange love of dolls. He plays with them as a child; as an adult he quits his post at Cambridge in order to produce a TV show wherein an animated doll, Little Brain, meets the great thinkers of history. Little Brain becomes a smash hit, and perhaps inevitably, Solanka finds himself in America. (It's not only the show-biz version of manifest destiny that brings him to the New World: one night in London he finds himself standing over the...


Satanic Verses
Salman Rushdie
0312270828
December 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
No book in modern times has matched the uproar sparked by Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, which earned its author a death sentence. Furor aside, it is a marvelously erudite study of good and evil, a feast of language served up by a writer at the height of his powers, and a rollicking comic fable. The book begins with two Indians, Gibreel Farishta ("for fifteen years the biggest star in the history of the Indian movies") and Saladin Chamcha, a Bombay expatriate returning from his first visit to his homeland in 15 years, plummeting from the sky after the explosion of their jetliner, and proceeds through a series of metamorphoses, dreams and revelations. Rushdie's powers of invention are astonishing in this Whitbread Prize winner. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Salman Rushdie
D. C. R. A. Goonetilleke
0312213085
October 1998
Hardcover
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Review
"...a welcome addition to the Rushdie critical canon." --Wasafiri


Salman Rushdie
Margaret Reynolds
0099437643
July 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
In Vintage Living Texts, teachers and students will find the essential guide to the writer’s works, together with an in-depth interview relating specifically to the texts under discussion. Each guide deals with the writer’s themes, genre and narrative technique and a close reading will provide a rich source of ideas for intelligent and inventive ways of approaching the novels.

Texts:
Midnight’s Children
The Moor’s Last Sigh
Shame


From the Publisher
In Vintage Living Texts, students, teachers, and general readers will find essential guides to some of the most exciting works in contemporary literature. Each guide focuses on three or four works by a major novelist; the series is unique in that it offers exclusive in–depth...


God of Small Things
Arundhati Roy
0060977493
June 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
In her first novel, award-winning Indian screenwriter Arundhati Roy conjures a whoosh of wordplay that rises from the pages like a brilliant jazz improvisation. The God of Small Things is nominally the story of young twins Rahel and Estha and the rest of their family, but the book feels like a million stories spinning out indefinitely; it is the product of a genius child-mind that takes everything in and transforms it in an alchemy of poetry. The God of Small Things is at once exotic and familiar to the Western reader, written in an English that's completely new and invigorated by the Asian Indian influences of culture and language. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
With sensuous prose, a dreamlike style infused with...


Salman Rushdie
Daniel A. Greenberg
0791074005
April 2003
Hardcover
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Book Description
Best known for the highly controversial Satanic Verses, Salman Rushdie brings to his novels the perspective of a South African expatriate caught between the diverse cultures of the East and West. He is able to bring to his work a parodic detatchment from the two cultures, as well intimate knowledge of the struggle of a South African expatriate. This title, Salman Rushdie, part of Chelsea House Publishers’ Modern Critical Views series, examines the major works of Salman Rushdie through full-length critical essays by expert literary critics. In addition, this title features a short biography on Salman Rushdie, a chronology of the author’s life, and an introductory essay written by Harold Bloom, Sterling Professor of the Humanities, Yale University.


Imaginary Homelands
Salman Rushdie
0140140360
May 1992
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Rushdie calls his controversial novel The Satanic Verses "a migrant's-eye view of the world," and indeed the theme of cultural transplantation informs many of the 75 essays and reviews gathered in this impressive collection. Whether he is analyzing racial prejudice in Britain or surveying an India riven by fundamentalism and politics of religious hatred, he writes as an impartial observer, a citizen of the world. just used 'writes', and to tighten. aa Subtle and witty, these concise, eloquent pieces are a pleasure to read. Rushdie's 'wide-ranging,' again. and 'sympathies' doesn't make sense. aa focusok? ranges from Grace Paley's stories to Thomas Pynchon's political allegories. He situates such writers as Gunter Grass, John le Carre and Mario Vargas Llosa /why have you marked this?all spelling are correct.gss in...


Moor's Last Sigh
Salman Rushdie
0679744665
December 1996
Paperback
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Book Review
In The Moor's Last Sigh Salman Rushdie revisits some of the same ground he covered in his greatest novel, Midnight's Children. This book is narrated by Moraes Zogoiby, aka Moor, who speaks to us from a grave in Spain. Like Moor, Rushdie knows about a life spent in banishment from normal society--Rushdie because of the death sentence that followed The Satanic Verses, Moor because he ages at twice the rate of normal humans. Yet Moor's story of travail is bigger than Rushdie's; it encompasses a grand struggle between good and evil while Moor himself stands as allegory for Rushdie's home country of India. Filled with wordplay and ripe with humor, it is an epic work.

From Publishers Weekly
This saga of a family whose history is interwoven with that of modern India, Rushdie's first...


XXX: 30 Porn-Star Portraits
Timothy Greenfield-Sanders
0821277545
September 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Now in paperback, a provocative look at today+s leading porn stars combined with insightful, offbeat, and amusing texts by an all-star literary lineup.XXX, by renowned photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, features cleverly paired portraits (one clothed and one nude) of the top stars in pornographic film. A cross section of straight and gay men and women is represented, from porn legends to rising stars. Performers in the book include celebrities like Jenna Jameson (the leading porn star of our time), Ron Jeremy, and Nina Hartley, as well as fast-rising names like Sunrise Adams, Belladonna, and Chad Hunt. The book also features short essays on the intersection of pornography and culture by a wide range of distinguished writers, including Salman Rushdie, Francine du Plessix Gray, John Malkovich, Nancy Friday, and...


Dangling Man
Saul Bellow
0140189351
Oct 1996
Paperback
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Shame
Salman Rushdie
0312270933
December 2000
Paperback
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The New York Times Book Review, Robert Towers
Shame is a lively, amusing and exasperating work .... What he invents, with enormous gusto, is "a sort of modern fairy tale".... I found Mr. Rushdie's style a source of delight, a bright stream of words that lifted me happily past the most threatening snags and whirlpools of this impossible tale. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Sunday Telegraph
There can seldom have been so robust and baroque an incarnation of the political novel as Shame. It can be read as a fable, polemic or excoriation; as history or as fiction.... This is the novel as myth and as satire. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Cultural Imperialism and the Indo-English Novel
Fawzia Afzal-Khan
0271010134
Nov 1993
Paperback
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