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The Small Room
May Sarton
0393008320
Oct 1976
Paperback
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Journal of a Solitude
May Sarton
0393309282
October 1992
Paperback
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About the Author
A wonderfully prolific poet, novelist, memoirist, and journal-writer, May Sarton has always enjoyed an extremely wide and loyal readership. Though she considered poetry to be her life's work, it was her novels and journals that made her famous. Plant Dreaming Deep, a memoir published in 1968, tells the story of her decision at forty-five years old to buy a house in a small New Hampshire village and to live and write in it alone. Journal of a Solitude (1973), the first of a series of journals about her life in a different house on the Maine coast, brought her many new readers-particularly women-who identified with her efforts to carve out and describe a life of chosen solitude in all its rewards and contrary vicissitudes. Sarton's journals chronicle the dailiness of the life of a woman artist. She struggles to...


Halfway to Silence
May Sarton
0393009920
May 1980
Paperback
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Fur Person
May Sarton
0393301311
November 1983
Paperback
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About the Author
May Sarton (1912-1995) was an acclaimed poet, novelist, and memoirist. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Sarton Selected
Bradford Dudley Daziel
0393029689
May 1991
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
This inspiriting collection gathers Sarton's zestful journals, fiction, essays on her craft, and the poetry--taut, formal and passionate--for which she is best known. Sarton, who will be 79 on publication daynifty! , writes of solitude, of ardent love and friendship, houses and gardens, painting and music, and the erotic act of art--as in her poems "The Consummation" and "The Lady and the Unicorn." Her animal poems are poignant, often making application to humans; in "Of Molluscs" lovers, too, are "shelled up in fears." Sarton explores age, sickness (in the novel A Reckoning ), even death as thresholds of deepening experience: the subjects of the poem "Old Lovers at the Ballet" find in themselves that "the soul is a lithe and serene athlete." The narrator of "My Father's Death" compares her bereavement to a...


May Sarton: Biography
Margot Peters
0449907988
June 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
Margot Peters had full access to May Sarton's letters, journals, and notes while she researched and wrote this biography, and the result is a book that charts Sarton's personal life as it explores her work as a poet, novelist, and feminist. Peters carefully details Sarton's many love affairs (mostly with women), portraying the writer as an insensitive and self-absorbed lover who was prone to betrayal on the slightest pretext. She attributes this behavior to Sarton's precarious sense of self-worth, developed as a result of parental neglect in her early childhood. That low self-esteem resonated in Sarton's incessant fear--despite publishing 15 books of poetry, 19 novels, and 13 memoirs and journals--that her writing might not be quite up to par. Peters draws this out and, unlike many literary biographers, allows that her...


Collected Poems, 1930-1993
May Sarton
0393034933
May 1993
Hardcover
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Understanding May Sarton
Mark K. Fulk
1570034222
July 2001
Hardcover
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Coming Into Eighty
May Sarton
0393036898
Nov 1994
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In these sparely fashioned poems Sarton (The Silence Now) contemplates life from the perspective of 80 years. The book is dedicated to the poet's cat, her muse. This may seem whimsical, and some of the poems are essentially notations ("A Thought"). Others, however, like sudden revelations that occur in the small hours, are distilled and crystalline: "these poems are minimal because my life is reduced to essences." Their tone is often dark, as the poet remembers friends and family now gone. Sarton's poetic voice ranges from such painful severity to rhythmic, rhyming celebrations of life which owe much to Yeats, whom she acknowledges as an inspiration. But for her, old age represents less an aesthetic stance than an everyday reality, sometimes painfully personal and revealing: "When I am dressed/ At last/ It is a...


As We Are Now
May Sarton
0393309576
October 1992
Paperback
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May Sarton
May Sarton
0393039544
June 1997
Hardcover
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From Library Journal
Sarton, the late poet, novelist, and memoirist (she died in 1995), occupies a distinctly midrange position in U.S. literature, and thus the appeal of her letters will be limited largely to specialists interested in the minutiae of her life and work. Too bad: this first volume of her letters should have a broader audience, because Sarton is one of the great letter writers of our time, cultivating friends vigorously with her funny, smart, comforting prose. She tells one chum that, following a morning of distraction, she quieted her mind with a book on Japanese art, whereupon "a great peace descended like an owl sitting beside me and staring solemnly," an effect not unlike that which readers of this pleasant book will feel from time to time. Edited by Sherman (May Sarton: Among the Usual Days, LJ 10/15/93), the...


House of Gathering: Poets on May Sarton's Poetry, Vol. 34
Marilyn Kallet (Editor)
0870497855
April 1993
Hardcover
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The Fur Person
May Sarton
0393041948
Nov 2002
Hardcover
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About the Author
May Sarton (1912-1995) was an acclaimed poet, novelist, and memoirist.


A House of Gathering: Poets on May Sarton's Poetry, Vol. 34
Marilyn Kallet (Editor)
0870497944
January 1994
Paperback
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Selected Poems of May Sarton
May Sarton
0393045129
Sept 1978
Paperback
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After the Stroke: A Journal
May Sarton
0393306305
March 1990
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
The distinguished poet/essayist (The Magnificent Spinster, At Seventy) here presents diary entries from April 1986 through February 1987, written while she was recovering from a life-threatening stroke. Sarton, isolated at the time at her New England home, describes poignantly the long, anxious days of weakness and worrry over the future, fears balanced by accounts of faithful friends who brought her material as well as esthetic comfort. The book also contains the author's recollections of early successes and disappointments in her career as well as regrets for lost loves. A lyrical, candid, sensitive spirit pervades this chronicle, which ends with Sarton well again, rejoicing in the present and putting the past behind her. Photos not seen by PW. Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Dear Juliette
Susan Sherman
0393047334
June 1999
Hardcover
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Book Review
The poet May Sarton's reputation took a nosedive after her death in 1995 and the unflattering biography (by Margot Peters) that followed. The publication of her tender, revealing letters has managed to arrest this decline. Susan Sherman, who edited Sarton's Selected Letters, 1916-1954, now offers insight into Sarton's most profound and affecting romance, with Juliette Huxley, the Swiss-born wife of the English scientist Sir Julian Huxley. May and Juliette met in 1936, while May was involved with Julian. Their love affair culminated in one passionate week in Paris in 1948, after which--hurt by May's angry threat that she would tell Julian--Juliette broke off the relationship. After Julian Huxley's death in 1976, they began to write one another again and kept in contact until Juliette's death. As May Sarton wrote in old age,...


At Eighty-Two: A Journal
May Sarton
0393038890
November 1995
Hardcover
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Book Review
Since Journal of a Solitude, May Sarton's musings on books, poetry, friendship and the pleasures of everyday life have grown richer with each new installment. In this, her last journal, Sarton continues to adjust to the feeling that she is a stranger in the land of old age. And though her struggles and daily setbacks continue, there is an optimistic, musing tone as she contemplates this unique time in a person's life. May Sarton died in July 1995, not long after completing this volume.

From Publishers Weekly
Poet, novelist, survivor and writer of journals, Sarton is back with a chronicle of 1993-1994, the year she turned 82. Newcomers to this series will be hypnotized by the progression of days as Sarton struggles to cope with life in a large Maine house. The winter is unusually...


At Eighty-Two: A Journal
May Sarton
039331622X
May 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
Since Journal of a Solitude, May Sarton's musings on books, poetry, friendship and the pleasures of everyday life have grown richer with each new installment. In this, her last journal, Sarton continues to adjust to the feeling that she is a stranger in the land of old age. And though her struggles and daily setbacks continue, there is an optimistic, musing tone as she contemplates this unique time in a person's life. May Sarton died in July 1995, not long after completing this volume. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
Poet, novelist, survivor and writer of journals, Sarton is back with a chronicle of 1993-1994, the year she turned 82. Newcomers to this series will be hypnotized by the progression of days as Sarton...


May Sarton
May Sarton
0393051110
May 2002
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
"[W]ho do I write for? Certainly not only for women... I guess I write for sensitive human beings wherever they are, however young or old, and of whatever sex. But I do not write for academic critics, that's sure. Nor do they like what I write. It is a mutual lack of interest." Her regret over the lateness of critical acclaim for her work is among the revelations about the prolific (with more than 50 books to her credit) and beloved Sarton, poet, novelist and diarist. In a note of appreciation, her friend William Drake says Sarton the letter writer was always swift, candid, blustery, boisterous and even defensive, but, he sums up, "the most difficult people can be the most worth knowing and treasuring." Sherman (who also edited May Sarton: Selected Letters, 1916-1954) presents 200 of the thousands of letters...

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