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My American History
Sarah Schulman
0415908531
May 1994
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Schulman, best known as an award-winning novelist (Empathy, LJ 11/1/92) and journalist for both the gay and mainstream press, has here assembled all the nonfiction articles she wrote over an 11-year period. From AIDS to Thelma and Louise, Schulman takes us on a tour of gay culture over the last decade and brings us into the mind of a young gay Jewish woman living in the United States today. In one previously unpublished essay "I Was a Lesbian Child," Schulman writes about society's hypocrisy in denying gay teachers the opportunity to be role models for their students, both gay and straight, while continuing to endorse the hiring of heterosexual males even though over 90 percent of sexual abuse cases are perpetrated by men against girls. Her views may have a limited audience, but this collection of essays, reviews,...


Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS, and the Marketing of Gay America
Sarah Schulman
0822322641
September 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
While working as a theater critic for Manhattan's New York Press in 1996, novelist Sarah Schulman reviewed the original off-Broadway production of the eventual worldwide hit Rent. She did not particularly like the show and resented what she saw as its easy and simple-minded appropriation of the East Village's gay and alternative cultures. It was only later, when a friend pointed it out to her, that she began to see that the writer and composer of Rent, Jonathan Larson, had "borrowed" a good chunk of his play's plot and detail from Schulman's own 1987 novel People in Trouble. This shock of recognition was transformative, and it ultimately led to the writing of Stagestruck.

Schulman begins with an unhappy account of having her novel ripped off by Larson, but uses this as a springboard to discuss the broader and more...



Stagestruck - CL
Sarah Schulman
0822321327
Sept 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
While working as a theater critic for Manhattan's New York Press in 1996, novelist Sarah Schulman reviewed the original off-Broadway production of the eventual worldwide hit Rent. She did not particularly like the show and resented what she saw as its easy and simple-minded appropriation of the East Village's gay and alternative cultures. It was only later, when a friend pointed it out to her, that she began to see that the writer and composer of Rent, Jonathan Larson, had "borrowed" a good chunk of his play's plot and detail from Schulman's own 1987 novel People in Trouble. This shock of recognition was transformative, and it ultimately led to the writing of Stagestruck.

Schulman begins with an unhappy account of having her novel ripped off by Larson, but uses this as a springboard to discuss the broader and more...



Empathy
Sarah Schulman
1551522012
May 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Lesbian writer Schulman follows her well-received After Delores and People in Trouble with this insightful allegory, which explores the feminine and masculine qualities said to coexist within every personality. The novel is prefaced by a troubling quote from Freud, which alleges that lesbianism results from a woman's frustrated Elektra complex and desire to punish her father. This theory is challenged by protagonist Anna O (meant to suggest a famous Freud patient), a lesbian secure in her attraction to women yet struggling with male sexism, her family's homophobia and her feelings that she is unlovable. Anna consults "street-corner psychiatrist" Doc, who roams New York's Lower East Side and charges patients $10 an hour for his listening skills. Representing the female and male halves of a complete person, Anna...


Girls, Visions, and Everything
Sarah Schulman
1580050220
June 1999
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Lila Futuransky is a lesbian living on the East Side of New York who admires Jack Kerouac and is determined to emulate her hero. She wanders around the city, takes many lovers, but then she meets Emily. They fall for each other, and soon Lila must choose between her love for Emily and her desire to continue living out her fantasy from On the Road. Unfortunately Schulman tries to imitate Kerouac's writing style rather than develop her own voice. Moreover, the narrative bogs down in Lila's wanderings, which lead to sketchy encounters with stereotypical druggies, homophobes and homosexual artists. There are too many unnecessary characters, and the setting, Manhattan's hip, wild, creative downtown scene, does not come alive.Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or...


My American History: Lesbian and Gay Life during the Reagan and Bush Years
Sarah Schulman
0304331678
January 1995
Hardcover
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Queer Question: Essays on Desire and Democracy
Scott Tucker
0896085775
October 1997
Paperback
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From Library Journal
The author, a gay health activist and journalist, offers a progressive vision of democracy as an experiment, a process in need of constant renewal, as seen through the lens of the gay rights movement. The essays cover such topics as the right to privacy vs. the right to live openly in the world, the need to redefine the family to include the true nature of relations in modern society, feminism and gay porn, and the reinvigoration of what the author views as an all too moribund social democratic agenda now abandoned by the traditional left wing in the United States. Tucker has an effective, almost relentless gift for pushing the envelope of an argument, taking nothing for granted and questioning every position, including his own. This challenging, often provocative work by a distinctive voice of a newer, more...


Circa 2000: Lesbian Fiction at the Millennium
Terry Wolverton (Editor)
155583518X
July 2000
Paperback
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Book Review
One of these days, readers are going to notice that lesbian fiction has moved far beyond the dour, correct, and clumsy scribblings that graced--or failed to grace--the lesbian-feminist journals of the '70s and '80s. In this fresh and impressive collection, Terry Wolverton and Robert Drake (editors of the recent His and Hers volumes) bring together writers as celebrated as Dorothy Allison and Carole Maso--neither of whom can be termed a "lesbian writer," if this suggests a small audience and a limited subject matter--with relative newcomers like Robin Podolsky and Cynthia Bond. Among the best stories (most of which were previously published within the last nine years) are A.M. de la Luz Montes' "R for Ricura," the tale of a delicious, necessary loss of innocence; "Larissa Lai's "When Fox Is a Thousand," a novel excerpt that...


Loss within Loss: Artists in the Age of Aids
Edmund White (Editor)
0299170748
February 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"The essays in this book mark a void," writes noted novelist White (The Married Man) in his introduction to this admirable volume, which commemorates the lives of dozens of artists who have died from AIDS. White, who edited the collection and commissioned most of the works, allows the 22 contributors to bear witness to their loss in their unique voices. Conventionality takes a backseat to searing honesty in Sarah Shulman's "Through the Looking Glass"--which praises the accomplishments of editor/writer Stan Leventhal even as it declares, "this guy could not really write"--and to the mix of barbs and accolades Craig Lucas brings to his evocation of lost lovers. Many of the authors blur the distinctions between memoir and biography; some rant, some gossip, some grieve. Many explore the transience of fame, the...


Loss within Loss: Artists in the Age of Aids
Edmund White (Editor)
0299170705
February 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"The essays in this book mark a void," writes noted novelist White (The Married Man) in his introduction to this admirable volume, which commemorates the lives of dozens of artists who have died from AIDS. White, who edited the collection and commissioned most of the works, allows the 22 contributors to bear witness to their loss in their unique voices. Conventionality takes a backseat to searing honesty in Sarah Shulman's "Through the Looking Glass"--which praises the accomplishments of editor/writer Stan Leventhal even as it declares, "this guy could not really write"--and to the mix of barbs and accolades Craig Lucas brings to his evocation of lost lovers. Many of the authors blur the distinctions between memoir and biography; some rant, some gossip, some grieve. Many explore the transience of fame, the...


On Our Backs: The Best Erotic Fiction
Lindsay McClune (Editor)
1555836526
November 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
For 16 years, On Our Backs has published the lesbian community's sexiest and most controversial erotic fiction. Now, for the first time, the best stories from this groundbreaking magazine are collected in one volume. The talents of writers as varied as Dorothy Allison, Fetish Diva Midori, Jewelle Gomez, Pat Califia, Peggy Munson, Joan Nestle, and Sarah Schulman come together to provide stories of erotic intensity while also exploring many of the political and social issues surrounding lesbian sex. On Our Backs: The Best Erotic Fiction will stimulate a new generation of women-intellectually and otherwise.Lindsay McClune is a former associate editor of On Our Backs. A freelance editor, she makes her home in Portland, Oregon.

About the Author
Lindsay McClune is a former associate...


Queer Renaissance: Contemporary American Literature and the Reinvention of Lesbian and Gay Identities
Robert McRuer
0814755542
June 1997
Hardcover
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Card catalog description
The Queer Renaissance puts a name to the unprecedented outpouring of creative work by openly lesbian and gay novelists, poets, and playwrights in the past two decades. This volume is one of the first to critically analyze this cultural awakening and is one of the only books to consider the work of gay male and lesbian writers together. Most importantly, it is the first book to consider how this wave of creative activity has worked in tandem with a flourishing of radical queer politics. The Queer Renaissance explores the work of such important figures as Audre Lorde, Edmund White, Randall Kenan, Gloria Anzaldua, Tony Kushner, and Sarah Schulman to question the dichotomy between art and activism. In addition, it interrogates the ways queer theory deploys, intersects with, and contests contemporary theoretical...

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