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For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/when the Rainbow Is Enuf: A Choreopoem
Ntozake Shange
0684843269
July 1997
Paperback
·
 
Review
The New York TimesExtraordinary and wonderful...Ntozake Shange writes with such exquisite care and beauty that anyone can relate to her message.
Toni Cade BambaraMs. MagazineCelebrates the capacity to master pain and betrayals with wit, sister-sharing, reckless daring, and flight and forgetfulness if necessary. She celebrates most of all women's loyalties to women.
Douglas WattNew York Daily NewsOverwhelming...It's joyous and alive, affirmative in the face of despair.
Allan WallachNewsdayPassionate and lyrical....In poetry and prose Shange describes what it means to be a black woman in a world of mean streets, deceitful men and aching loss.
Martin GottfriedNew York PostThese poems and prose selections are...rich with the author's special voice: by turns bitter, funny, ironic, and savage; fiercely honest...


Nappy Edges
Ntozake Shange
0312064241
July 1991
Paperback
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Ellington Was Not a Street
Ntozake Shange
0689828845
January 2004
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-8-Nelson illustrates the noted poet's "Mood Indigo," from her collection entitled A Daughter's Geography. The book begins with the opening lines of the poem set against a pale gray page: "it hasn't always been this way/ellington was not a street." Opposite, a full-page painting shows several people walking beneath a green sign that reads Ellington St. A young African-American woman carrying a red umbrella is prominently featured, and readers will soon understand that she is the child narrator, all grown up (the resemblance is striking). In the poem, Shange recalls her childhood when her family entertained many of the "-men/who changed the world," including Paul Robeson, W.E.B. DuBois, Ray Barretto, Dizzy Gillespie, "Sonny Til" Tilghman, Kwame Nkrumah, and Duke Ellington. Both the words and the rich,...


Black Book
Robert Mapplethorpe
0312083025
Dec 1986
Hardcover
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Review
"Mapplethorpe wants to photograph everything; that is , everything that can be made to pose. What he looks for, which could be called Form, is the quiddity or isness of something. Not the truth about something, but the strongest version of it...Certain People are, mostly, people found, coaxed, or arranged into a certainty about themselves. That is what seduces, that is what is disclosed in these bulletins of great photographer's observations and encounters." --Susan Sontag

"His eye for a face is the eye of a novelist in search of a character; his eye for a body that of a classical sculptor in search of an 'ideal.' His sitters-whenter celebrities or pick-ups, beautiful girls or his black friends-seem mesmerized not by the lens but by his presence, and they are temporarily transported into a dreamworld."...


Erotique Noire: Black Erotica
Miriam DeCosta-Willis (Editor)
0385423098
September 1992
Paperback
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From Library Journal
The editors are to be congratulated for amassing a collection of erotica worthy in its own right because of the writers showcased, among them Alice Walker, Chester Himes, Gloria Naylor, Jewelle Gomez, Charles Blockson, Audre Lorde, and Essex Hemphill. Coverage is not limited to African American writers but includes African, Caribbean American, and Latin American writers, whether straight or gay, of prose, poetry, or fiction. For some authors, this anthology features their first piece of erotic writing. Readers will be familiar with other selections, for example, Lorde's "Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power." As a whole, this book successfully challenges stereotypical notions about black erotica and serves up delightful sexual tidbits for just about everyone's taste.-Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of South Carolina...


I Live in Music
Ntozake Shange
0941807096
December 1999
Hardcover
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Book Description
Shange's lyrical poem is a tribute to the language of music and the magical, often mystical, rhythms that connect people. Music defines who we are as individuals, the places where we live, and how we exist within our communities. Music is life.

Written in a syncopated style that has its own melody, the poem is perfectly married to twenty-one extraordinary and diverse works from Romare Bearden who once said, "I paint in the tradition of the blues."

Here is a unique and visionary book that speaks, indeed sings, to both children and adults and is, at once, compelling, profond, and entertaining.

About the Author
Ntozake Shange (b. 1948) is the author of for colored girls--who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf, Sassafras, Cypress &...


Betsey Brown
Ntozake Shange
0312134347
Aug 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This novel about a black family living in St. Louis in 1957 centers on Betsey, 13, who is restless, wants to "be somebody" and is being bused to a white school. Her mother and grandmother oppose and her father supports integration. When the father plans to take Betsey and her siblings to demonstrate against a racist hotel, the mother leaves home. PW stated that "by depicting and personalizing the racial tensions of the 1950s through the lives of appealing characters, Shange has produced a memorable, quietly powerful book." Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review
“A lyrical coming-of-age novel . . . about a teenaged black girl who endures the trials of school...


Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth
Bill Roorbach
0195135563
January 2001
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
The most inclusive collection of creative nonfiction available, Contemporary Creative Nonfiction: The Art of Truth is the only anthology that brings together examples of all three of the main forms in the genre: the literary memoir, the personal essay, and literary journalism. Featuring a
generous and diverse sampling of more than sixty works, this collection includes beautiful, disturbing, and instructive works of literary memoir by such writers as Mary McCarthy, Annie Dillard, and Judy Ruiz; smart, funny, and moving personal essays by authors ranging from E.B. White to Phillip
Lopate to Ntozake Shange; and incisive, vivid, and quirky examples of literary journalism by Truman Capote, Barbara Ehrenreich, Sebastian Junger, and many others. This unique volume also contains examples of captivating nature writing,...


Passing (Modern Library Classics)
Nella Larsen
0375758135
May 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
The heroine of Passing takes an elevator from the infernal August Chicago streets to the breezy rooftop of the heavenly Drayton Hotel, "wafted upward on a magic carpet to another world, pleasant, quiet, and strangely remote from the sizzling one that she had left below." Irene is black, but like her author, the Danish-African American Nella Larsen (a star of the 1920s to mid-1930s Harlem Renaissance and the first black woman to win a Guggenheim creative-writing award), she can "pass" in white society. Yet one woman in the tea room, "fair and golden, like a sunlit day," keeps staring at her, and eventually introduces herself as Irene's childhood friend Clare, who left their hometown 12 years before when her father died. Clare's father had been born "on the left hand"--he was the product of a legal marriage between a white...


How I Come by This Cryin' Song
Ntozake Shange
031219899X
June 2006
Hardcover
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Scars of Conquest/Masks of Resistance: The Invention of Cultural Identities in African, African-American, and Caribbean Drama
Tejumola Olaniyan
0195094050
June 1995
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This original work redefines and broadens our understanding of the drama of the English-speaking African diaspora. Looking closely at the work of Amiri Baraka, Nobel prize-winners Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott, and Ntozake Shange, the author contends that the refashioning of the collective
cultural self in black drama originates from the complex intersection of three discourses: Eurocentric, Afrocentric, and Post-Afrocentric.

From blackface minstrelsy to the Trinidad Carnival, from the Black Aesthetic to the South African Black Consciousness theatres and the scholarly debate on the (non)existence of African drama, Olaniyan cogently maps the terrains of a cultural struggle and underscores a peculiar situation in which
the inferiorization of black performance forms is most often a shorthand for...


Sugar in the Raw
Rebecca Carroll
0517884976
Jan 1997
Paperback
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Book Review
Conducting interviews for Sugar in the Raw, Rebecca Carroll traveled to 12 cities across the country, and talked to more than 50 girls. From that number, she selected 15 who tell their stories in their own words in this stereotype-breaking book. Nicole, a 17-year-old biracial girl living in Vermont, tells us she checks the boxes for every race category on census forms. "You can call me whatever you please," she says, "but I'll still be Nicole." Elsewhere, Laninka, also 17, from Birmingham, Alabama, tells of her love for ballet and African dance, while Sophie, 20, who lives in Freehold, New Jersey, tells of growing up in her adoptive white family and her search for her black identity. Throughout, the girls show their strength and their determination to make a way for themselves in a world that does...


Scars of Conquest/Masks of Resistance: The Invention of Cultural Identities in African, African-American, and Caribbean Drama
Tejumola Olaniyan
0195094069
January 1995
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
This original work redefines and broadens our understanding of the drama of the English-speaking African diaspora. Looking closely at the work of Amiri Baraka, Nobel prize-winners Wole Soyinka and Derek Walcott, and Ntozake Shange, the author contends that the refashioning of the collective
cultural self in black drama originates from the complex intersection of three discourses: Eurocentric, Afrocentric, and Post-Afrocentric.

From blackface minstrelsy to the Trinidad Carnival, from the Black Aesthetic to the South African Black Consciousness theatres and the scholarly debate on the (non)existence of African drama, Olaniyan cogently maps the terrains of a cultural struggle and underscores a peculiar situation in which
the inferiorization of black performance forms is most often a shorthand for...


Sugar in the Raw
Rebecca Carroll
0613025059
Jan 1997
Hardcover
·
 


Sassafrass, Cypress & Indigo
Ntozake Shange
0312140916
January 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Playwright and novelist Shange writes of the creative and personal lives of three artistic black sisters from South Carolina. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Kirsten Backstrom
Sassafrass weaves tapestries, Cypress dances, Indigo makes magnificent dolls and plays a wild violin. Their originality is ever-present; even the time-honored transition into womanhood provides Indigo with an opportunity for expression: "Indigo, I don't want to hear another word about it...'" her Mamma says, "I'm not setting the table with my Sunday china for fifteen dolls who got their period today.'" The novel gives a brief, but expressive glimpse of Indigo's future and then moves across the country with Sassafrass and Cypress as they, like...


For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf
Ntozake Shange
0613135520
Sept 1997
Hardcover
·
 
Review
Martin Gottfried New York Post These poems and prose selections are...rich with the author's special voice: by turns bitter, funny, ironic, and savage; fiercely honest and personal. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
From its inception in California in 1974 to its highly acclaimed critical success at Joseph Papp's Public Theater and on Broadway, the Obie Award-winning for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf has excited, inspired, and transformed audiences all over the country. Passionate and fearless, Shange's words reveal what it is to be of color and female in the twentieth century. First published in 1975 when it was praised by The New Yorker for "encompassing...every feeling and experience a woman has ever had,"...


A Stranger in the Village: Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing
Farah J. Griffin (Editor)
0807071218
May 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Representing a people that first "traveled" to the New World via slavery, this splendid collection of 47 entries reveals a complex and nonmonolithic African American world-view ranging from U.S. frontier exploration to Pan-Africanism.

Alongside James Baldwin, W.E.B. Du Bois, Richard Wright, and Claude McKay writing about Paris, Mexico, Africa, and Russia, author Ntozake Shange muses on the unifying presence of the African American Motown sound in Nicaragua, and 19th-century leader Booker T. Washington offers astute analysis of northern Italian prejudice against its southern citizens. In Martin Luther King Jr.'s description of his 1959 pilgrimage to India, he writes, "We were looked upon as brothers with the color of our skins as something of an asset...," whereas in journalist Carl T. Rowan's 1956...


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