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Young Lions
Irwin Shaw
0226751295
October 2000
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
The Young Lions is a vivid and classic novel that portrays the experiences of ordinary soldiers fighting World War II. Told from the points of view of a perceptive young Nazi, a jaded American film producer, and a shy Jewish boy just married to the love of his life, Shaw conveys, as no other novelist has since, the scope, confusion, and complexity of war.


Bury the Dead
Irwin Shaw
0822201658
July 2002
Paperback
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Short Stories: Five Decades
Irwin Shaw
0226751287
December 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
Featuring sixty-three stories spanning five decades, this superb collection-including "Girls in Their Summer Dresses," "Sailor Off the Bremen," and "The Eighty-Yard Run"-clearly illustrates why Shaw is considered one of America's finest short-story writers.



The Young Lions Part 1 of 2
Irwin Shaw
0736602089
February 1979
Audio
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Book Description
Part One Of Two Parts Irwin Shaw was a noted playwright and author of short stories when his first novel, THE YOUNG LIONS, was published in 1948. The work was a best seller and established Shaw as a major American novelist. Set in WW II, the book traces three young men, two Americans and a German, from 1938 to 1945 when they meet as soldiers in a Bavarian forest. The outcome, as in any tragedy, is preordained, but it leaves the reader with a deep appreciation of the tensions of those times and what it meant to be in combat, in earnest, in a war where the issues were clearly drawn.

From the Publisher
10 1.5-hour cassettes


The Young Lions Part 2 of 2
Irwin Shaw
0736602097
February 1979
Audio
·
 
Book Description
Part Two Of Two Parts Irwin Shaw was a noted playwright and author of short stories when his first novel, THE YOUNG LIONS, was published in 1948. The work was a best seller and established Shaw as a major American novelist. Set in WW II, the book traces three young men, two Americans and a German, from 1938 to 1945 when they meet as soldiers in a Bavarian forest. The outcome, as in any tragedy, is preordained, but it leaves the reader with a deep appreciation of the tensions of those times and what it meant to be in combat, in earnest, in a war where the issues were clearly drawn.

From the Publisher
9 1.5-hour cassettes


Blood and Champagne: The Life and Times of Robert Capa
Alex Kershaw
0306813564
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
An evocative biography of the incomparable Robert Capa, the most famous photojournalist of the twentieth century. Robert Capa, one of the finest photojournalists and combat photographers of the twentieth century, covered every major conflict from the Spanish Civil War to the early conflict in Vietnam. Always close to the action, he created some of the most enduring images ever made with a camera--perhaps none more memorable than the gritty photos taken on the morning of D-Day. But the drama of Capa's life wasn't limited to one side of the lens. Born in Budapest as Andre Freidman, Capa fled political repression and anti-Semitism as a teenager by escaping to Berlin, where he first picked up a Leica camera. He founded Magnum, which today remains the most prestigious photographic agency of its kind. He was a gambler and...


Brothers No More (A Blackford Oakes Novel)
William F. Buckley, Jr.
0156004763
October 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Buckley's latest novel mixes fact and fiction in a meditation on courage and morality. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Buckley's newest gripper begins in World War II, when a young man covers for a friend whose courage failed him at the last moment, and ends in acrimony years later.Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Blood and Champagne: The Life and Times of Robert Capa
Alex Kershaw
0312315643
July 2003
Hardcover
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Book Review
"It does seem to me that Capa has proved beyond all doubt that the camera need not be a cold mechanical device," John Steinbeck wrote of photojournalist Robert Capa in a quote that launches this well-written, exhaustively researched biography. "Like the pen, it is as good as the man who uses it. It can be the extension of mind and heart." That’s quite a compliment coming from an author like Steinbeck, but then Capa won the respect and friendship of some of the brightest talents of his generation; other admirers and poker buddies included Ernest Hemingway and John Huston, and among his many loves was actress Ingrid Bergman. Capa won fame slogging through the blood and grime to capture vivid images of five different wars, from the Spanish Civil War (where he wasn't above staging some of his photographs), through the...


Brothers No More (A Blackford Oakes Novel)
William F. Buckley, Jr.
1561002666
September 1995
Audio
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Buckley's latest novel mixes fact and fiction in a meditation on courage and morality. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Library Journal
Buckley's newest gripper begins in World War II, when a young man covers for a friend whose courage failed him at the last moment, and ends in acrimony years later.Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Even the Rhinos Were Nymphos: Best Nonfiction
Bruce Jay Friedman
0226263509
October 2000
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Better known for his novels (A Mother's Kisses), plays (Scuba Duba) and screenplays (Splash), Friedman has also garnered over the past four decades a reputation as a journalist whose sly wit complements his idiosyncratic insights. This collection of 23 nonfiction pieces, ranging from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s, brings together a sampling of the author's best magazine writing from Esquire, New York magazine and Playboy, among other publications. Friedman is at his most wry when he is writing about theater and Hollywood. In "Tales from the Darkside" (published in Smart in 1988), he details how a brief stint as a film producer (a far more prestigious and powerful position than that of a writer) still never got him the access and respect he desired. In "Some Thoughts on Clint Eastwood and Heidegger," a quirky,...

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