Book Finder
    
 
> Literature & Fiction > Authors A-Z > Skvorecky Josef
 

Engineer of Human Souls
Josef Skvorecky
1564781992
January 1999
Paperback
·
 
Newsweek, Aug. 13, 1984
Among its many other virtues, The Engineer of Human Souls is perhaps the funniest academic novel since Malcolm Bradbury's The History Man

Quill Quire, May 1984
A complex, challenging analysis of contemporary politics and society, The Engineer of Human Souls will become a milestone in the evolution of world literature

See all Editorial Reviews


Fiction of Josef Skvorecky
Paul I. Trensky
0312053363
September 1991
Hardcover
·
 


When Eve Was Naked
Josef Skvorecky
0374149755
June 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Just before Skvorecky turned 70, his friends urged him to write his memoirs. He decided instead to publish this collection of short stories, in which "nearly everything worth telling," as he writes in his preface, is present in one form or another. Taken together, the 24 tales work as both biography and history, tracking the literary life of one of the former Czechoslovakia's premier writers and the fate of his country under Nazi rule and Communist repression. The initial stories, which go by such self-explanatory titles as "How My Literary Career Began," "My Uncle Kohn" and "My Teacher, Mr. Katz," offer brief snapshots of the author's early years, and the specter of Nazism constantly hovers in the background as various characters are spirited away to the concentration camps. The most effective items in the...


Dvorak in Love
Josef Skvorecky
0393305481
May 1988
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A foreigner's love affair with America is the central subject of this engaging new novel by the expatriate Czechoslovakian author ( The Bass Saxophone. In an elliptical style familiar to readers of his previous books, Skvorecky builds a polyphonic account of the famous composer's two trips to the United States in the 1890s, orchestrated by the sharply individual voices of various Americans who met him. The result is an affectionate yet not uncritical portrait of a raw, often brutal country that nonetheless offers previously undreamed-of opportunities to the immigrants who have arrived on its shores. Dvorak'sand Skvorecky'spassionate love for black American music makes him sharply aware of the terrible injustices the U.S. has still not redressed, but the novel's conclusion seems to be that personal initiative and...


The Bass Saxophone
Josef Skvorecky
0880013702
September 1994
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Czech


The Miracle Game
Josef Skvorecky
0393308499
June 1992
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This big, lush political novel spans 20 years of recent Czech history, culminating in the Prague Spring and the Russian invasion of 1968. Shortly after the war, Danny Smiricky, the cynical hero of Skvorecky's novel The Engineer of Human Souls , is present--although dozing--in a rural Bohemian church when a statue of St. Joseph moves on its pedestal, seemingly of its own volition. The Catholic clergy call it a miracle, but the Communist secret police conduct their own investigation. Alleging that the event was a fraud, they torture and murder the attending priest. In the more liberal political climate of the late '60s, Smiricky sets out to help a crusading journalist solve the mystery; the novel is loosely structured as a detective story, complete with clues and false trails. But Smiricky's real role is devil's...


Two Murders in My Double Life
Josef Skvorecky
0312420269
April 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Skvorecky left his native Czechoslovakia in 1969 in the wake of the Soviet invasion and has been living in Canadian exile ever since. For the last 30 years, he has published copiously in Czech and has fared well in English translation (The Cowards; The Engineer of Human Souls; etc.). Now in his 70s, he has written his first book in English an intermittently eloquent if not entirely persuasive fiction, part murder mystery and part campus novel. The protagonist is an unnamed Skvorecky-like professor in Canadian exile, whose wife, Sidonia, a writer and editor, is being cruelly slandered in the Czech Republic by resentful postcommunist climbers. Meanwhile, life on the Toronto campus is disrupted by an unlikely murder. Two radically dissimilar worlds are here juxtaposed and interwoven: Central Europe, with its...


Closely Watched Trains
Bohumil Hrabal
0810112787
Mar 1995
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Czech


Two Murders in My Double Life
Josef Skvorecky
0374280258
April 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Skvorecky left his native Czechoslovakia in 1969 in the wake of the Soviet invasion and has been living in Canadian exile ever since. For the last 30 years, he has published copiously in Czech and has fared well in English translation (The Cowards; The Engineer of Human Souls; etc.). Now in his 70s, he has written his first book in English an intermittently eloquent if not entirely persuasive fiction, part murder mystery and part campus novel. The protagonist is an unnamed Skvorecky-like professor in Canadian exile, whose wife, Sidonia, a writer and editor, is being cruelly slandered in the Czech Republic by resentful postcommunist climbers. Meanwhile, life on the Toronto campus is disrupted by an unlikely murder. Two radically dissimilar worlds are here juxtaposed and interwoven: Central Europe, with its...


When Eve Was Naked: Stories of a Life's Journey
Josef Skvorecky
0312421737
July 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Just before Skvorecky turned 70, his friends urged him to write his memoirs. He decided instead to publish this collection of short stories, in which "nearly everything worth telling," as he writes in his preface, is present in one form or another. Taken together, the 24 tales work as both biography and history, tracking the literary life of one of the former Czechoslovakia's premier writers and the fate of his country under Nazi rule and Communist repression. The initial stories, which go by such self-explanatory titles as "How My Literary Career Began," "My Uncle Kohn" and "My Teacher, Mr. Katz," offer brief snapshots of the author's early years, and the specter of Nazism constantly hovers in the background as various characters are spirited away to the concentration camps. The most effective items in the...


Sins for Father Knox
Josef Skvorecky
0393307875
August 1991
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In 1929, Father Ronald A. Knox set down the guidelines for writing good detective fiction. His 10 "commandments"no "Chinamen" allowed; only one secret passage; no supernatural agenciesto name a few, have been deliberately broken by Skvorecky, writing in a cleverly provocative vein. The result is a genuinely innovative, brain-teaser of a novel that pokes fun at American pulp fiction. Unlike The Mournful Demeanor of Detective Boruvka , a mystery that was set almost entirely in Prague, this collection of stories has an international flavor. Lt. Boruvka is featured in the first and last story; the real star is Eve Adam, a sexy Czech nightclub singer on tour in Europe and the U.S. At each port of call she's called upon to solve crimes of passionusing her brain cells and sometimes a little bit morethat the local...


Josef Skvorecky/Mario Vargas Llosa
John O'Brien
1564781534
Jan 1997
Paperback
·
 


The Spirit of Prague: And Other Essays
Ivan Klima
0964561123
September 1995
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This collection of critical pieces by the acclaimed Czech author of Waiting for the Darkness, Waiting for the Light offers a fine introduction to Klima's life, intellectual development and literary and cultural preoccupations. It includes essays on the author's boyhood, partly spent in the Nazi concentration camp Terezin; on his beginnings as a writer; and an interview with Philip Roth in which Klima expresses his views on Vaclav Havel and Milan Kundera, among other people and topics. There is also an essay on the creation of Prague's samizdat press and some rather cranky feuilletons, short pieces written for same. But the longer the essays, the more powerful. Klima's description of the genesis of organized opposition to the Czech Communist government after 1968 and his long closing work, delineating the role...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.