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Thirteen Ways of Looking at the Novel
Jane Smiley
1400040590
September 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Plagued by a sense of despair while writing her last novel, Good Faith, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Smiley (A Thousand Acres, etc.) decided to return to the enterprise that got her started as a writer: reading. The result is a book that sets out to investigate the novel itself. Smiley does not offer a radically new way of seeing the novel. Instead, her study is methodical and cumulative, producing a wonderful text, opinionated but not argumentative, instructive but not heavily theoretical text. The book is roughly divided into three sections: the first classifies the novel, beginning with the most simple of definitions (e.g., it's long, in prose, has a protagonist), and adds moral and aesthetic complexity as it moves along. The second section consists of a primer for fledgling novelists....


A Thousand Acres
Jane Smiley
1400033837
December 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
Aging Larry Cook announces his intention to turn over his 1,000-acre farm--one of the largest in Zebulon County, Iowa--to his three daughters, Caroline, Ginny and Rose. A man of harsh sensibilities, he carves Caroline out of the deal because she has the nerve to be less than enthusiastic about her father's generosity. While Larry Cook deteriorates into a pathetic drunk, his daughters are left to cope with the often grim realities of life on a family farm--from battering husbands to cutthroat lenders. In this winner of the 1991 National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, Smiley captures the essence of such a life with stark, painful detail. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and the NBCC...


Good Faith
Jane Smiley
0641570805

Hardcover
·
 


Uncle Tom's Cabin
Harriet Beecher Stowe
0375756930
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Review
"Uncle Tom's Cabin is the most powerful and enduring work of art ever written about American slavery."
—Alfred Kazin

Review
"Uncle Tom's Cabin is the most powerful and enduring work of art ever written about American slavery."
?Alfred Kazin

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Understanding Jane Smiley
Neil Nakadate
1570032513
May 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Card catalog description
In this comprehensive study of Jane Smiley's fiction, Neil Nakadate offers insight into the strikingly imaginative and intellectual range of a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer best known for A Thousand Acres. He provides close readings - from the early Barn Blind to The All-True Travels and Adventures of Lidie Newton - and presents the first extended account of the connections between her life and her work. Drawing on the critical record, previously unpublished interviews with the novelist, and Smiley's own prolific commentary on literature, writing, and American culture, Nakadate examines her intellectual interests, social and philosophical concerns, and penchant for taking up different creative challenges with successive books. He traces the ongoing themes of her work, including those of family, environmental...


Moo
Jane Smiley
0804117683
Feb 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
The hallowed halls of Moo University, a midwestern agricultural institution (aka "cow college"), are rife with devious plots, mischievous intrigue, lusty liaisons, and academic one-upsmanship. In this wonderfully written and masterfully plotted novel, Jane Smiley, the prizewinning author of A Thousand Acres, offers a wickedly funny, darkly poignant comedy. A finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Effortlessly switching gears after the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Thousand Acres, Smiley delivers a surprising tour de force, a satire of university life that leaves no aspect of contemporary academia unscathed. The setting is a large midwestern agricultural college known as...


Writers on Writing, Volume 2: More Collected Essays from The New York Times
Produced by The New York Times
064165572X

Hardcover
·
 


Best New American Voices
Jane Smiley
0156029014
Oct 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
This "best" annual seeks outstanding short stories by participants in the nation's 370-plus college and university writing programs. So far each guest editor has selected some writers who go on to great success. Last year, for example, Francine Prose selected Rattawut Lapcharoensap, whose first book, Sightseeing (2004), is a big hit, and Eric Puchner, whose debut story collection is forthcoming. The short story owes its continued vitality to writing workshops, notes this edition's astute guest editor, Jane Smiley, who also states, "I never write short stories, and as a reader, I find them a little scary." She also avers, "Short stories are hard to write." That said, Smiley has chosen extraordinarily well crafted and intense examples. In Jennifer Shaff's "Leave of Absence," a young PE instructor mourning the death...


Horse Heaven
Jane Smiley
0804119430
August 2003
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
It takes a great deal of faith to gear a novel this horse-besotted to the general public. Horse love is one of those things either you get or you don't, and for the vast majority of the populace, horse stories tend to read like porn written for 13-year-old girls. The good news, then, is that while a love of all things equine is not a prerequisite for enjoying Jane Smiley's Horse Heaven, a love of human perversity is. Racing, after all, is at worst a dangerous, asset-devouring folly and at best an anachronism, as one of her horse trainers notes: The Industry Leaders had made it their personal mission to bring horse racing to the attention of the general public, with the NFL as their model and television as their medium of choice, which was fine with Farley, though his own view was that horse racing out at the track,...


A Year at the Races: Reflections on Horses, Humans, Love, Money and Luck
Jane Smiley
1400033179
April 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In a wide-ranging and detailed, yet somewhat flat memoir, Smiley (A Thousand Acres; Moo; etc.) examines the nuances of horses' lives and of the people who build their lives around them. She does not aim "to evoke horseness, but to evoke horse individuality; to do what a novelist naturally does, which is to limn idiosyncrasy and character, and thereby to shade in some things about identity." This she accomplishes through illustrative episodes with some of the horses she has owned, focusing on two and their fortunes at the track. While the book offers anecdotes and an array of Smiley's theories about horse personality and cognizance, it lacks the narrative or dramatic flair that one expects would come naturally from such an accomplished novelist. The writing can often be formulaic: "In June, Eddie died, and Alexis...


Good Faith
Jane Smiley
0385721056
May 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Opening a Jane Smiley novel is like slipping into a warm bath. Here are people we know, places where we grew up. But the comforting, unassuming tone of her work allows Smiley incredible latitude as a writer, and her books are full of surprises. Good Faith, a novel about greed and self-delusion set in the economic boom of the early 1980s, is no exception. Joe Stratford is an amiable, divorced real estate agent in an unspoiled small town called Rollins Hills. He takes it in stride when a married female friend pursues a love affair with him; he is more suspicious when a high-rolling newcomer named Marcus Burns begins to influence the business affairs of the men closest to Joe. Nevertheless, the promise of easy riches draws Joe into one of Burns's real estate development schemes, and then, ominously, into gold trading. The...


Mommy Wars: Stay-at-Home and Career Moms Face off on Their Choices, Their Lives, Their Families
Leslie Morgan Steiner
1400064155
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Most of the women here, famous and otherwise, express a familiar guilt along with pride at how they make peace with their choices juggling motherhood and career. Some, like Harvard MBA Ann Misiaszek Sarnoff, have pursued a high-octane job while raising two kids; others have scaled back work or work at home in order to be with their kids all day. These mommies (most are upper-middle-class white mothers who've made careers out of writing in some form) almost without exception have solid, provider husbands, and nannies or full-time babysitters. Moms in similar situations stand to gain the most from the collection and will relish such gems as novelist Jane Smiley's "Feminism Meets the Free Market," where she notes, "Home was the refuge when the workplace drove us out," and PW editor-in-chief Sara Nelson's revelation,...


The Greenlanders
Jane Smiley
1400095468
Jan 1988
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In this vast, intricately patterned novel, Smiley accurately captures the voice of the medieval sagas. Understated, scattered with dreams and warnings, darkened by the brooding sense of unavoidable disasters to come, it is the tale of a Scandinavian settlement that lasted perhaps 500 years. With a meticulous attention to detail, the novel brings daily activities to lifefrom cheese making to hunting walruswhile examining the passions of a people under stress. The action centers on the family of Gunnar Asgeirsson. Gunnar's sister Margret is married off to Olaf, but he fails to consummate the marriage, and Margret begins a clandestine affair with a Norwegian sailor, Skuli Gudmundsson, who has stayed on in Greenland as a household retainer. Violence and tragedy ensue, and as Margret's unhappiness increases, her...


The Mill on the Floss
George Eliot
0451528263
Feb 2002
Paperback
·
 
Review
"As one comes back to [Eliot's] books after years of absence they pour out, even against our expectations, the same store of energy and heat, so that we want more than anything to idle in the warmth."
--Virginia Woolf


From the Trade Paperback edition. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
This novel's unsentimental evocation of childhood in the English countryside stands as an enduring triumph; but equally memorable are its portrayal of a narrow, tradition-bound society, its striking, superbly drawn heroine, Maggie Tulliver, and its dramatic unfolding of tragic human destiny.

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Town & Country's Social Graces: Words of Wisdom on Civility in a Changing Society
Jim Brosseau (Editor)
1588160807
May 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Civility is "under assault," says Town & Country editor-in-chief Pamela Fiori, and in a collection of the magazine's columns, Town & Country Social Graces: Words of Wisdom on Civility in a Changing Society, she and 46 other writers share their views on manners. Cokie Roberts and Steven V. Roberts tell how consideration for each other, such as using a tiny book light so as not to keep the other one awake, has kept their marriage strong. Anne Bernays speaks about grandparent-grandchild relations, and Wendy Wasserstein explains her point of view on proper theatergoing behavior. This compact book, edited by Jim Brosseau, lacks only author biographies. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
“Will enrich your spirit while providing a few gentle...


Charles Dickens
Jane Smiley
0670030775
May 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Two men who towered over the 19th century are the subjects of new Penguin Lives biographies coming in May. Novelist Jane Smiley's Charles Dickens aims to give a new perspective on the Victorian author, who, she says, was perhaps "the first true celebrity in the modern sense." Instead of giving a chronological account of his life, Smiley (The Age of Grief) presents the man as his contemporaries would have known him, addressing more intimate issues, like his painful childhood, only as they come up in his novels, and showing how he crafted his public persona as carefully as he did his literary creations. Smiley offers her own readings of many of his works. 5-city author tour. ( on sale May 13)Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
Smiley,...


Horses: Photographs
Michael Eastman (Photographer)
0375414681
October 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
More than a hundred extraordinary portraits—lush, rich, textured, sculptural—that reveal the spirit and nobility of the horse. Portraits of horses gazing at the camera, standing in the golden light, stamping away flies, galloping, bucking, rolling in the dust.

They are the work of Michael Eastman, a self-taught photographer influenced by Edward Weston, Walker Evans, and Henry Moore, who spent thirty years capturing the essential nature of subjects that range from Cuban life to landscapes to architecture in many places. Now he turns his refined eye to the magnificent horse.
Eastman has caught the animal’s complexity and power, fear and courage, goodness, masculinity, femininity, uniqueness.

“All animals are wonderful,” says Eastman, “but horses are truly...

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