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Darkness Visible
William Styron
0679736395
Jan 1990
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In 1985 William Styron fell victim to a crippling and almost suicidal depression, the same illness that took the lives of Randall Jarrell, Primo Levi and Virginia Woolf. That Styron survived his descent into madness is something of a miracle. That he manages to convey its tortuous progression and his eventual recovery with such candor and precision makes Darkness Visible a rare feat of literature, a book that will arouse a shock of recognition even in those readers who have been spared the suffering it describes.

From Publishers Weekly
A meditation on Styron's ( Sophie's Choice ) serious depression at the age of 60, this essay evokes with detachment and dignity the months-long turmoil whose symptoms included the novelist's "dank joylessness," insomnia, physical aversion to alcohol...


Sophie's Choice
William Styron
0679736379
Mar 1992
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
This recording is a complete and utter success if for no other reason than it makes you almost (almost) forget about Meryl Streep's tragic performance in the film version. It follows, then, that the person responsible for this success is narrator William Hope. He does a masterful job acting, not merely reading, Styron's extraordinary novel. Hope's portrayal of the trio of characters is true and explicit--Southern Stingo, Brooklynite Nathan, and Polish Sophie. Hope's voice embraces these people and destroys their facades to expose all the emotion, pathos, and humanity they can exude. He also transitions from one character to the next flawlessly, using almost perfect diction and pacing. It is entirely possible to hear every word in the book. That's how clear he is. R.I.G. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award ©...


In Search of Willie Morris: The Mercurial Life of a Legendary Writer and Editor
Larry L. King
1586483846
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
To read this loving, loquacious, warts-and-all tribute to the famed Harper's editor and author (My Dog Skip) who died in 1999 is to be a fly on the wall at a high-spirited wake attended by literati like Norman Mailer and David Halberstam. The prolific King (The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas), a friend of almost 40 years who wrote for Morris at Harper's, reconciles the brooding loner with the extroverted golden boy who at 32 revitalized America's oldest magazine. Morris's vast ambition and self-destructive alcoholism, according to King, can be traced to his overbearing, socially insecure smalltown Mississippi mother, who was a secret drinker. Most noteworthy is the description of Morris's colossal fall from grace and rash resignation from Harper's in 1971, where he was blamed for diminished profits. Other...


Inheritance of Night-C
William Styron
0822313103
Mar 1993
Hardcover
·
 


Confessions of Nat Turner
William Styron
0679736638
January 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Styron's 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel depicting the leader of a slave revolt is the latest offering in Random's "Modern Library." This is the least expensive hardcover edition of Turner currently available.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
In the late summer of 1831, in a remote section of southeastern Virginia, there took place the only effective, sustained revolt in the annals of American Negro slavery...

The revolt was led by a remarkable Negro preacher named Nat Turner, an educated slave who felt himself divinely ordained to annihilate all the white people in the region.

The Confessions of Nat Turner is narrated by Nat himself as he lingers in jail...


Dog Eat Dog
Edward Bunker
0312168187
Aug 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Ex-convict Bunker proved he could write a strong, dark thriller with his first book, No Beast So Fierce. For his latest effort, he returns to the same kind of story -- smart but doomed ex-cons doing the only kind of thing they know how to do. Troy Cameron came from a wealthy Beverly Hills family before reform school and San Quentin knocked off some of the polish. Now he has linked up with a pair of psychopathic colleagues to prey on other criminals. In Bunker's hands, the material takes on a great deal of energy and even sympathy for the devils. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly
Based on the suspense he generates in his fourth novel, it's easy to see why Bunker, an ex-con, has acquired such diverse admirers as Quentin...


The Critical Response to William Styron
Daniel W. Ross
0313280002
Dec 1995
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
William Styron has enjoyed a resurgence of popularity with the publication of Darkness Visible in 1990. Sometimes called Faulkner's literary heir, Styron has emerged as one of the most important figures in contemporary American literature and is best known for his continuation of the Southern gothic tradition. Through original essays, previously published reviews, and reprints of significant journal articles, this volume traces chronologically the critical reception of Styron's writings.

About the Author
DANIEL W. ROSS is Associate Professor of English at Columbus College in Columbus, Georgia, where he specializes in Southern literature.


Too Brief a Treat: The Letters of Truman Capote
Truman Capote
0375702415
September 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Considering Truman Capote's fabled social life, one would think that his private letters would be dripping with juicy gossip. Indeed, with correspondents and friends that included Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Lee Radziwill, Cecil Beaton, Christopher Isherwood, David O. Selznick, Tennessee Williams, Audrey Hepburn and Richard Avedon, these bright, energetic missives do include an occasional tasty tidbit. But as candid as Capote can be, one ultimately gets the sense that the author always knew his letters would be read by a wider audience some day, and rarely does Capote express less than bubbling enthusiasm and childlike devotion to his correspondents. It's up to Clarke, Capote's biographer, to fill in the occasionally sordid blanks, which he does in chapter intros and extensive footnotes. Much more profound than...


Holocaust Fiction
Sue Vice
0415185521
June 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Choice
"...solid and well written...Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above."

Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion
"This interesting book examines the controversies surrounding some of the more popular novels written about the Holocaust." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory
Kenneth S. Greenberg
0641713517

Paperback
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Holocaust Fiction
Sue Vice
041518553X
June 2000
Paperback
·
 
Choice
"...solid and well written...Highly recommended for upper-division undergraduates and above."

Indiana Jewish Post & Opinion
"This interesting book examines the controversies surrounding some of the more popular novels written about the Holocaust."

See all Editorial Reviews


Confessions of Nat Turner
William Styron
0613094832
Nov 1992
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Styron's 1967 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel depicting the leader of a slave revolt is the latest offering in Random's "Modern Library." This is the least expensive hardcover edition of Turner currently available.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Book Description
In the late summer of 1831, in a remote section of southeastern Virginia, there took place the only effective, sustained revolt in the annals of American Negro slavery...

The revolt was led by a remarkable Negro preacher named Nat Turner, an educated slave who felt himself divinely ordained to annihilate all the white people in the region.

The Confessions of Nat Turner is narrated by Nat himself as he lingers in jail...


Expedition Whydah: The Story of the World's First Excavation of a Pirate Treasure Ship and the Man Who Found Her
Barry Clifford
0060929715
May 2000
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
Buried treasure, bearded pirates, slaves fighting for freedom, this story has all the elements of an engaging fictional fantasy. But it's a true account. Clifford, a modern-day treasure hunter, uncovered a pirate ship filled with treasure, sunk over 250 years ago. Clifford is a better ship excavator than reader. He plods through the script in a monotone, even in emotional and exciting places. His Northeastern accent is obvious, complete with dropping his "R's." This fascinating tale should be listened to for the lesson it teaches about perseverance, not for its production. A.G.H. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

From Booklist
Sunk off the Cape Cod shoreline in the eighteenth century, the Whydah represents the...


Sophie's Choice
William Styron
0679602895
Feb 1998
Hardcover
·
 
From AudioFile
This recording is a complete and utter success if for no other reason than it makes you almost (almost) forget about Meryl Streep's tragic performance in the film version. It follows, then, that the person responsible for this success is narrator William Hope. He does a masterful job acting, not merely reading, Styron's extraordinary novel. Hope's portrayal of the trio of characters is true and explicit--Southern Stingo, Brooklynite Nathan, and Polish Sophie. Hope's voice embraces these people and destroys their facades to expose all the emotion, pathos, and humanity they can exude. He also transitions from one character to the next flawlessly, using almost perfect diction and pacing. It is entirely possible to hear every word in the book. That's how clear he is. R.I.G. Winner of AudioFile Earphones Award ©...


Gynicide: Women in the Novels of William Styron
David Hadaller
0838636330
March 1996
Hardcover
·
 


Mode of Melancholy: A Study of William Styron's Novels
Elisabeth Herion-Sarafidis
9155435173
September 1995
Paperback
·
 


This Quiet Dust
William Styron
0679735968
Jan 1993
Paperback
·
 
Review
"Styron is pre-eminent...in his instinct for tragedy and in his respect for the sheer force of human feeling." -- Alfred Kazin

In an age when much American writing is either glacially noncommittal or heremetically personal, William Styron persists in addressing great moral issues with incendiary passion. Seriousness and ardor characterize all the essays in This Quiet Dust, the first book of nonfiction by the Pulitzer Prize -- winning author of Lie Down in Darkness and Sophie's Choice.

In this new edition, which has been updated with the inclusion of six previously uncollected essays, Styron covers a wide range of concerns; yet whether he is recounting his search for the historic Nat Turner, peering into the abyss of Auschwitz, navigating the battlefields of Vietnam and Chicago in 1968, or offering fresh...

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