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Navajo ABC
Luci Tapahonso
0613159225
July 1999
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
English and Navajo (or Din?) words address aspects of Navajo life; colored-pencil illustrations serve as quiet complements. All ages. Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Booklist
Ages 4^-8. After introducing the Navajo people's name for themselves, T'aa Dine, the authors present a Dine alphabet book using objects and words familiar to the Navajo culture. Four letters appear with Dine words, but the remaining 22 are associated with English ones--belt, grandma, yucca, etc. Each pairing is illustrated by a colored-pencil picture of the object, plant, or person named. A glossary, which includes pronunciation guidance, provides translations and a cultural context for each item, adding to the book's...


Blue Horses Rush In: Poems and Stories
Luci Tapahonso
0816517282
July 1997
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Tapahonso (A Breeze Swept Through, West End, 1987) presents a poignant collection of stories and poems celebrating the joys and sorrows of everyday life. Some bring belly laughs, such as "I Remembered This One in Tucson," which tells of a young wife and mother's search for independence through the purchase of a used convertible. Others produce tears: In "White Bead Girl," a mother reviewing the life of the daughter who's run away is comforted by her father's words: "Once you remember something it never leaves you. It's how we know that we have lived." The title poem honors the birth of a grandchild who "arrived amid a herd of horses," bringing together the pasts of her ancestors. Although deeply entrenched in the author's Navajo heritage, these stories and poems speak to women of all cultures. Recommended for...


Saanii Dahataal, the Women Are Singing: Poems and Stories
Luci Tapahonso
0816513619
February 1993
Paperback
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Breeze Swept Through
Luci Tapahonso
0931122457
July 1987
Paperback
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Songs of Shiprock Fair
Luci Tapahonso
1885772114
Aug 1999
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 2-4-The oldest fair in the Navajo Nation is held annually in Shiprock, NM. This story follows young Nezbah through the event, from the excitement of waking on the first morning to the last moment of the festivities when her father carries her, tired and happy, into the house. All of the elements that make the fair special are described: preparations, traditional food, the parade and carnival, the powwow, and the Y?ibicheii dance on the last night. The illustrations are done in a lively folk-art style in vibrant colors (shades of teal, purple, and fuchsia), evocative of the Southwest. The text, a combination of narrative and poetry, presents an adequate picture of the event, but it's too long for a read-aloud. While good second-grade readers could handle it on their own, it's unlikely to hold their...


This Is How They Were Placed for Us: A Poem
Luci Tapahonso
1884235018
June 1994
Paperback
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Breath of Parted Lips: Voices from the Robert Frost Place, Vol. 1
Foreword by Donald Hall
0967885620
January 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Every year, a poet is invited to take up residence at an endowed residence in Franconia, New Hampshire. The Breath of Parted Lips: Voices from the Robert Frost Place, Volume One collects work from over 20 years of resident poets, including Robert Hass, Mary Ruefle, Denis Johnson, Luci Tapahonso and many others. Donald Hall, of Eagle Pond Farm, provides a short foreword on the house; its executive director (could Frost have imagined it?) Donald Sheehan introduces the poets. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Volume I of a two-volume collection of literary gifts, including poems, essays, and reminiscences honoring Robert Frost, poetry, art, and community from 24 prominent American poets, who were selected to live in Robert Frost's Franconia,...


Children of the Dragonfly: Native American Voices on Child Custody and Education
Robert Bensen (Editor)
0816520127
May 2001
Hardcover
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Carter Revard
"Encourages us to believe that human courage and ingenuity may keep alive our finest human values." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description
Native American children have long been subject to removal from their homes for placement in residential schools and in foster or adoptive homes. This is the first anthology to document the struggle for cultural survival on both sides of the U.S.-Canadian border. Through autobiography and interviews, fiction and traditional tales, official transcripts and poetry, these voices--Seneca, Cherokee, Mohawk, Navajo, and many others--weave powerful accounts of struggle and loss into a moving testimony to perseverance and survival. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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