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Selected Poems (Tsvetaeva, Marina)
Marina Tsvetaeva
0140187596
Jan 1994
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Although generally less well known here than Pasternak, Akhmatova and Mandelstam, Tsvetaeva is counted by some critics as the greatest of these four major poets of postrevolutionary Russia. However, as veteran translator McDuff indicates in his introduction, the sounds of Russian poetrywhich to this day remains formally traditional in its use of rhyme and metercan never be captured in English. Further, Tsvetaeva presents a particularly difficult problem to the translator because her transcendent reputation rests precisely on the aural values of her verse. That said, McDuff must be congratulated for his brave attempt to reproduce those formal qualities. If we cannot have Tsvetaeva herself, these stand on their own as creditable English-language poems. The selection represents the entire scope of her remarkable...


The Death of a Poet: The Last Days of Marina Tsvetaeva
Irma Kudrova
1585675229
February 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Drawing on interviews, diaries and recently available KGB records, Kudrova, who has written on the life and work of Marina Tsvetaeva (1892-1941), details the Russian poet's last years before her suicide at the age of 49. Despite the somewhat uneven translation, Kudrova's narrative is consistently gripping and exudes an aura of relentless tragedy. In 1922, the poet left Moscow to join her husband, Efron, who had been forced to emigrate to Paris for political reasons. With her son, Mur, and daughter, Alya (another daughter died earlier of malnutrition), she lived there and continued to write poetry. In 1937, Efron, who worked for the Soviet secret police, was ordered to return to Russia, where Alya now lived. In 1938, Tsvetaeva and their son followed and, for a time, all were housed by the state at a dacha in...


A Russian Psyche: The Poetic Mind of Marina Tsvetaeva
Alyssa W. Dinega
0299173305
November 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva's powerful poetic voice and her tragic life have often prompted literary commentators to treat her as either a martyr or a monster. Born in Russia in 1892, she emigrated to Europe in 1922, returned to the Soviet Union at the height of the Stalinist Terror, and committed suicide in 1941. Alyssa Dinega focuses on the poetry, rediscovering Tsvetaeva as a serious thinker with a coherent artistic and philosophical vision.

About the Author
Alyssa Dinega is the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Assistant Professor of Russian Language and Literature at the University of Notre Dame.


Russian Psyche: The Poetic Mind of Marina Tsvetaeva
Alyssa W. Dinega
0299173348
November 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva's powerful poetic voice and her tragic life have often prompted literary commentators to treat her as either a martyr or a monster. Born in Russia in 1892, she emigrated to Europe in 1922, returned to the Soviet Union at the height of the Stalinist Terror, and committed suicide in 1941. Alyssa Dinega focuses on the poetry, rediscovering Tsvetaeva as a serious thinker with a coherent artistic and philosophical vision.

About the Author
Alyssa Dinega is the Rev. Edmund P. Joyce, C.S.C. Assistant Professor of Russian Language and Literature at the University of Notre Dame.


Earthly Signs
Jamey Gambrell
0300069227
Nov 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
It is a commentary on the provincialism of national cultures that a figure of towering greatness in one can be almost unknown in another. Such might be said of Russian poet Tsvetaeva, considered along with Akhmatova, Mandelstam, and Pasternak to be the greatest poet of Russia's agonizing 20th century, yet she is not as well known in the West as her talent merits. Tsvetaeva, who committed suicide in 1942 at the age of 48, shortly after her return to her homeland after many years as an exile in the West, wrote this collection of essays in the early period of revolutionary Russia (1917-20). They are published here for the first time in English and could be said to constitute a book of poetry written in prose. Whether describing her experiences gathering food in the Crimea for her family in Moscow or her quixotic...


Milestones (European Poetry Classics Series)
Marina Tsvetaeva
0810119412
July 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Milestone is a bilingual edition of a diary in verse from one of the great Russian poets.

Language Notes
Text: English, Russian (translation)
Original Language: Russian

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Beyond the Noise of Time: Readings of Marina Tsvetaeva's Memories of Childhood
Karin Grelz
9122020586
July 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
This is a Ph.D. dissertation. Although quite a few researchers have pointed to the significance of the childhood theme in Tsvetaeva's work, no systematic analysis of her work has been done from this perspective. Nor have her childhood reminiscences been treated as a thematically consistent whole, but have rather been read as instances of the poet's prose in general. The present study examines Marina Tsvetaeva's memories of childhood in the context of her work and in the context of the cultural and political reality to which these reminiscences refer and in which they were written - i.e., Russia around the turn of the century and the Russian émigré world of 1930-1937. The study also touches upon the symbolic and allegorical dimension of the texts - Tsvetaeva's "otherspeak" in her prose. It is shown that...


Death Of A Poet
Irma Kudrova
0715632620
Feb 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Drawing on interviews, diaries and recently available KGB records, Kudrova, who has written on the life and work of Marina Tsvetaeva (1892-1941), details the Russian poet's last years before her suicide at the age of 49. Despite the somewhat uneven translation, Kudrova's narrative is consistently gripping and exudes an aura of relentless tragedy. In 1922, the poet left Moscow to join her husband, Efron, who had been forced to emigrate to Paris for political reasons. With her son, Mur, and daughter, Alya (another daughter died earlier of malnutrition), she lived there and continued to write poetry. In 1937, Efron, who worked for the Soviet secret police, was ordered to return to Russia, where Alya now lived. In 1938, Tsvetaeva and their son followed and, for a time, all were housed by the state at a dacha in...


Selected Poems
Marina I. Tsvetaeva
1903039371
February 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Although generally less well known here than Pasternak, Akhmatova and Mandelstam, Tsvetaeva is counted by some critics as the greatest of these four major poets of postrevolutionary Russia. However, as veteran translator McDuff indicates in his introduction, the sounds of Russian poetrywhich to this day remains formally traditional in its use of rhyme and metercan never be captured in English. Further, Tsvetaeva presents a particularly difficult problem to the translator because her transcendent reputation rests precisely on the aural values of her verse. That said, McDuff must be congratulated for his brave attempt to reproduce those formal qualities. If we cannot have Tsvetaeva herself, these stand on their own as creditable English-language poems. The selection represents the entire scope of her remarkable...


The Ratcatcher
Marina Tsvetaeva
0810118165
Jan 2000
Paperback
·
 


Silk, the Shears and Marina: Or, about Biography
Irena Vrkljan
0810116049
February 1999
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Serbo-Croation --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Marina Tsvetaeva - C
Lily Feiler
0822314827
Oct 1994
Hardcover
·
 
From Library Journal
Somewhat overshadowed in the West by famous contemporaries Akhmatova, Mandelstam, and Pasternak, noteworthy Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva is finally getting the attention she deserves. Translator/ scholar Feiler's critical biography is the second in as many years, following quickly on the heels of Viktoria Schweitzer's successful Tsetaeva (LJ 4/15/93). Feiler and Schweitzer cover the same territory-the poet's singular childhood, struggles during the Revolution, exile, and eventual return to the Soviet Union, where she committed suicide in 1941-but differ in tone. While Schweitzer is rhapsodic and inspired, Feiler is sober, clear, and direct. She places somewhat greater emphasis on Tsvetaeva's troubled relationship with her mother and offers solid readings of the poems. Public libraries already owning Schweitzer's...


Marina Tsvetayeva: A Critical Biography
Maria Razumovsky
1852240458
October 1995
Hardcover
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Russian, German


Tsvetaeva's Orphic Journeys in the Worlds of the Word
Olga Peters Hasty
0810113155
July 1996
Hardcover
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Letters: Summer 1926
Boris Pasternak
0940322714
July 2001
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Poets Pasternak, Marian Tsvetayeva, and Rainer Maria Rilke were not having a banner year in 1926: Pasternak was stuck in Moscow trying to stay out of the way of the Bolsheviks; Tsvetayeva was in France after having been booted from Russia; and Rilke was dying in Switzerland. The trio began a correspondence spelling out their assorted woes as well as holding lengthy discussions about art, love, and other poetic topics. This 1983 title offers a selection of their letters along with numerous photographs. Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Edited by Yevgeny Pasternak, Yelena Pasternak, and Konstantin M. Azadovsky

The summer of 1926 was a time of trouble and uncertainty for each of the three poets whose correspondence is collected in...


Marina Tsvetaeva
Berkeley Slavic Specialties
1572010061
Aug 1994
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: Russian, English

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