Book Finder
    
 
> Literature & Fiction > Authors A-Z > Wideman John Edgar
 

John Edgar Wideman
Keith Eldon Byerman
0805708707
February 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Series Editors: Gary Scharnhorst, University of New Mexico and Eric Haralson, State University of New York, Stony Brook

This is the only series to provide in-depth critical introductions to major modern and contemporary short story writers worldwide. Each volume offers: A comprehensive overview of the artist's short fiction-including detailed analyses of every significant story Interviews, essays, memoirs and other biographical materials -- often previously unpublished A representative selection of critical responses Acomprehensive primary bibliography, a selected bibliography of important criticism, a chronology of the artist's life and works and an index



Brothers and Keepers: A Memoir
John Edgar Wideman
0618509631
January 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
With novels like Damballah and Hiding Place, John Edgar Wideman began his career in an explicitly modernist vein--indeed, his chronicles of life in the Pittsburgh ghetto of Homewood had more than a trace of a Joycean accent. The autobiographical Brothers and Keepers, however, allowed the writer to find his own voice. Perhaps this dual portrait of the author and his brother Robby--serving, then and now, a life sentence for a murder committed during a bungled robbery--finally forced Wideman to fuse the modernist trappings of his earlier work with the storytelling traditions of African American culture. "My memories needed his," the author recalls. "Maybe the fact that we recall different things is crucial. Maybe they are foreground and background, propping each other up." In any case, the Rashomon-like...


Every Tongue Got to Confess
Zora Neale Hurston
0060188936
Dec 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Although Hurston is better known for her novels, particularly Their Eyes Were Watching God, she might have been prouder of her anthropological field work. In 1927, with the support of Franz Boas, the dean of American anthropologists, Hurston traveled the Deep South collecting stories from black laborers, farmers, craftsmen and idlers. These tales featured a cast of characters made famous in Joel Chandler Harris's bowdlerized Uncle Remus versions, including John (related, no doubt, to High John the Conqueror), Brer Fox and various slaves. But for Hurston these stories were more than entertainments; they represented a utopia created to offset the sometimes unbearable pressures of disenfranchisement: "Brer Fox, Brer Deer, Brer 'Gator, Brer Dawg, Brer Rabbit, Ole Massa and his wife were walking the earth like natural...


Breaking Ice
Terry McMillan
0140116974
Oct 1990
Paperback
·
 


Live from Death Row
Mumia Abu-Jamal
0380727668
June 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Sentenced to death in 1982 for the murder of a police officer, after a trial that has since attracted considerable criticism, African American journalist Abu-Jamal presents a collection of his prison writings. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
After a bizarre shooting of a policeman and an equally bizarre trial, Abu-Jamal was convicted of murder and sentenced to Pennsylvania's death row. Twelve years later, he is still there, although new evidence has been found to support his innocence. This volume is a collection of his writings, which, for the most part, document the atrocities of prison life. The reader may sympathize with Abu-Jamal's plight and even question his guilt in the shooting but will probably find this book fragmented and...


Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States
Zora Neale Hurston
0060934549
September 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Although Hurston is better known for her novels, particularly Their Eyes Were Watching God, she might have been prouder of her anthropological field work. In 1927, with the support of Franz Boas, the dean of American anthropologists, Hurston traveled the Deep South collecting stories from black laborers, farmers, craftsmen and idlers. These tales featured a cast of characters made famous in Joel Chandler Harris's bowdlerized Uncle Remus versions, including John (related, no doubt, to High John the Conqueror), Brer Fox and various slaves. But for Hurston these stories were more than entertainments; they represented a utopia created to offset the sometimes unbearable pressures of disenfranchisement: "Brer Fox, Brer Deer, Brer 'Gator, Brer Dawg, Brer Rabbit, Ole Massa and his wife were walking the earth like natural...


Fever
John Edgar Wideman
0140143475
Oct 1990
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"Of the 12 stories in Wideman's wide-ranging new collection, six have never been previously published, and most are standouts. Wideman excels in a variety of prose styles, adopting the points of view of both black and white characters, telling some stories entirely in dialogue, others in unrelieved exposition," stated PW . Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
In this collection Wideman shows he knows how to give a story place in both physical and psychic terms. In "Rock River" he lays out a mangy dog of a town tucked somewhere in the foothills of the Southwest. Here suicide seems as much a part of the terrain as the "thickets of boulders," dry riverbeds, and dusty roads that define the hopelessness of the landscape. In "Concert," place is...


My Soul Has Grown Deep
John Edgar Wideman
0345455665
Oct 2002
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
en/Faulkner Award-winning novelist John Edgar Wideman presents the best of early African-American writing in My Soul Has Grown Deep: Classics of Early African-American Literature, featuring such works as The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk in full text, with informative biographical introductions. Appreciative and thorough, Wideman provides an introduction to each author's life and work, and acknowledges the literary presence of black women writers in early American literature: Karen Lee, Sojourner Truth, Phyllis Wheatley and Ida B. Wells. The 12 works consist mostly of autobiographical essays, along with the poetry of Paul Lawrence Dunbar and Phyllis Wheatley. 100,000 first printing; $25,000 marketing campaign; 5-city author tour. Copyright 2001 Cahners...


Native Sons in "No Man's Land": Rewriting Afro-American Manhood in Novels of James Baldwin, Alice Walker, John Edgar Wideman, and Ernest Gaines
Philip Auger
081533060X
February 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
With the study of selected novels by Baldwin, Walker, Wideman, and Gaines, Native Sons in No Man's Land examines the discursive politics involved in the rewriting of such powerless, inarticulate versions of black manhood as that codified by Richard Wright in Native Sons' Bigger Thomas. The novels treated in this study present their writers sharing a desire to transcend the language barriers that control mainstream definitions of (Black) manhood. A close critical reading of these texts reveals a great deal about the American and, specifically, Afro-American aspiration to manly identity, about the relationship between one's sense of "manhood" and one's control of discourse, and about the power of language to shape identity.


Hoop Roots: Basketball, Race, and Love
John Edgar Wideman
0395857317
September 2001
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Basketball is only the starting point for novelist John Edgar Wideman's meditations in this genre-defying book, which announces its difference in the opening paragraph. Some other author might have written the sentence, "Playing the game provided sanctuary, refuge from a hostile world." Only Wideman would follow it with, "Only trouble was, to reach the court we had left our women behind," and only Wideman would close a book about playground basketball with a letter to his grandmother. In between, he contrasts the sport with the craft of writing; mingles memories of learning to play with recollections of growing up in Pittsburgh; invokes the lover he found after his 30-year marriage broke up ("Turning this into a basketball game, aren't you, Mr. Hoopster?" she says at one point during their affair); talks about minstrel shows...


Two Cities
John Edgar Wideman
0395857309
Sept 1998
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Most fiction built along musical rather than traditional narrative lines quickly sinks under the weight of its own pretensions. Not so Two Cities, John Edgar Wideman's multivoiced improvisation in the key of life. Ranging from funk to blues to jazz, Motown to gospel to pure high classical, these wise and gritty riffs tell the story of Kassima, who's had hard luck with her men--two drug-dealing sons shot dead and a husband downed by AIDS within ten months: "Just boys and men the whole time I been in this house. Men who act like boys, boys trying to be men. One run-ragged woman trying to teach them the difference between man and boy. As if I knew. As if they ever had a chance."

As the novel opens, Kassima is stepping out for the first time since her bereavement, looking for considerably less than the good and sexy man...



Art of the Story: An International Anthology of Contemporary Short Stories
Various
0140296387
November 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
A reader doesn't want to love every story in an anthology. A collection of short fiction by various authors should be just that: various. We want all the stories to be admirable, but not necessarily lovable. This is how anthologies do their job, which is to teach us to love new forms of fiction. And this is how Daniel Halpern, editor of The Art of the Story, does his job. Halpern previously brought us the successful and far-reaching collection The Art of the Tale. Now he has taken upon himself the task of creating an international sampling of the contemporary short story. Seventy-eight writers from 35 countries--including Banana Yoshimoto, Junot Díaz, Peter Hoeg, Julian Barnes, T.C. Boyle, Salman Rushdie, Peter Carey, Edwidge Danticat, and Tatyana Tolstaya--demonstrate that the story still brims with unrest and...


Critical Essays on John Edgar Wideman
Bonnie Tusmith (Editor)
157233469X
April 2006
Hardcover
·
 


Stories of Resilience in Childhood: The Narratives of Maya Angelou, Maxine Hong Kingston, Richard Rodriguez, John Edgar Wideman, and Tobias Wolff
Daniel D. Challener
0815328001
June 1997
Hardcover
·
 


Sent for You Yesterday
John Edgar Wideman
0395877296
Apr 1998
Paperback
·
 
Review
The New York Times : "establishes a mythological and symbolic link between character and landscape, language and plot, that in the hands of a less visionary writer might be little more than stale sociology."

Review
"establishes a mythological and symbolic link between character and landscape, language and plot, that in the hands of a less visionary writer might be little more than stale sociology."

See all Editorial Reviews


Damballah
John Edgar Wideman
0395897971
July 1998
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
This short story collection and novel, respectively, both published in 1981, are the second and third volumes in the author's Homewood trilogy. Damballah contains a dozen stories spanning many years in a Pittsburgh community founded by a runaway slave. Hiding Place shares the same setting.Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review
The New York Times : "A novelist of high seriousness and dept . . . enormous care and intelligence."

See all Editorial Reviews


Hoop Roots: Basketball, Race, and Love
John Edgar Wideman
0618257756
January 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Basketball is only the starting point for novelist John Edgar Wideman's meditations in this genre-defying book, which announces its difference in the opening paragraph. Some other author might have written the sentence, "Playing the game provided sanctuary, refuge from a hostile world." Only Wideman would follow it with, "Only trouble was, to reach the court we had left our women behind," and only Wideman would close a book about playground basketball with a letter to his grandmother. In between, he contrasts the sport with the craft of writing; mingles memories of learning to play with recollections of growing up in Pittsburgh; invokes the lover he found after his 30-year marriage broke up ("Turning this into a basketball game, aren't you, Mr. Hoopster?" she says at one point during their affair); talks about minstrel shows...

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.