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The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight: Wolfe, Mailer, Didion and the New Journalism Revolution
Marc Weingarten
1400049148
November 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Today, it's routine for writers to go undercover to get a story; precedent for such experiential reportage really took off in the 1960s. It took outside-the-box reporters like Hunter S. Thompson to ride with the Hell's Angels, or Tom Wolfe to drop acid with Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters, or John Sack and Michael Herr to go to Vietnam with the grunts to tell it like it really was. This "New Journalism," described as "journalism that reads like fiction and rings with the truth of reported fact," started a revolution in the publishing world, reviving old magazines (Esquire) and inventing new ones (Rolling Stone; New York). Freelance journalist Weingarten tells this story in loosely chronological fashion, pausing to highlight key writers (Thompson, Wolfe, Mailer, Didion, Breslin) and editors (particularly Clay Felker)...


The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
Tom Wolfe
0553380648
October 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
They say if you remember the '60s, you weren't there. But, fortunately, Tom Wolfe was there, notebook in hand, politely declining LSD while Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters fomented revolution, turning America on to a dangerously playful way of thinking as their Day-Glo conveyance, Further, made the most influential bus ride since Rosa Parks's. By taking On the Road's hero Neal Cassady as his driver on the cross-country revival tour and drawing on his own training as a magician, Kesey made Further into a bully pulpit, and linked the beat epoch with hippiedom. Paul McCartney's Many Years from Now cites Kesey as a key influence on his trippy Magical Mystery Tour film. Kesey temporarily renounced his literary magic for the cause of "tootling the multitudes"--making a spectacle of himself--and Prankster Robert Stone had to...


Tom Wolfe Carves Wood Spirits and Walking Sticks
Tom Wolfe
0887404413
September 1992
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Legend has it that the forest of the world are inhabited by elusive creatures known as "Wood Spirits." Tom Wolfe finds them everywhere and brings them to life in this delightful new instructional book. Using found wood such as driftwood, roots, and old beams from dilapidated barns, he leads the reader through the carving of wondrous, fanciful faces, that are both enchanting and beautiful. On a smaller scale, Tom also finds the Wood Spirits in walking sticks, creating treasures that are handsome and functional at the same time. Tom has been carving these Spirits for years, and they are constantly in demand. Now he leads the carver, step-by-step, through their creation, each step illustrated in beautiful color photographs. An extensive gallery is included, jam-packed with examples and ideas for the reader's own work. ...


I Am Charlotte Simmons
Tom Wolfe
0312424442
August 2005
Paperback
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Product Description: Dupont University--the Olympian halls of learning housing the cream of America's youth, the roseate Gothic spires and manicured lawns suffused with tradition... Or so it appears to beautiful, brilliant Charlotte Simmons, a sheltered freshman from North Carolina. But Charlotte soon learns, to her mounting dismay, that for the uppercrust coeds of Dupont, sex, Cool, and kegs trump academic achievement every time.

As Charlotte encounters Dupont's privileged elite--her roommate, Beverly, a Groton-educated Brahmin in lusty pursuit of lacrosse players; Jojo Johanssen, the only white starting player on Dupont's godlike basketball team, whose position is threatened by a hotshot black freshman from the projects; the Young Turk of Saint Ray fraternity,...



The Right Stuff
Tom Wolfe
1579124585
May 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Tom Wolfe began The Right Stuff at a time when it was unfashionable to contemplate American heroism. Nixon had left the White House in disgrace, the nation was reeling from the catastrophe of Vietnam, and in 1979--the year the book appeared--Americans were being held hostage by Iranian militants. Yet it was exactly the anachronistic courage of his subjects that captivated Wolfe. In his foreword, he notes that as late as 1970, almost one in four career Navy pilots died in accidents. "The Right Stuff," he explains, "became a story of why men were willing--willing?--delighted!--to take on such odds in this, an era literary people had long since characterized as the age of the anti-hero."

Wolfe's roots in New Journalism were intertwined with the nonfiction novel that Truman Capote had pioneered with In Cold Blood. As ...



The Dark Tower I: The Gunslinger
Stephen King
0451210840
July 2003
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Thirty-three years, a horrific and life-altering accident, and thousands of desperately rabid fans in the making, Stephen King's quest to complete his magnum opus rivals the quest of Roland and his band of gunslingers who inhabit the Dark Tower series. Loyal DT fans and new readers alike will appreciate this revised edition of The Gunslinger, which breathes new life into Roland of Gilead, and offers readers a "clearer start and slightly easier entry into Roland's world."

King writes both a new introduction and foreword to this revised edition, and the ever-patient, ever-loyal "constant reader" is rewarded with secrets to the series's inception. That a "magic" ream of green paper and a Robert Browning poem, came together to reveal to King his "ka" is no real surprise (this is King after all), but who would have thought...



The Bonfire of the Vanities
Tom Wolfe
0553381342
Oct 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
After Tom Wolfe defined the '60s in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and the cultural U-turn at the turn of the '80s in The Right Stuff, nobody thought he could ever top himself again. In 1987, when The Bonfire of the Vanities arrived, the literati called Wolfe an "aging enfant terrible."

He wasn't aging; he was growing up. Bonfire's pyrotechnic satire of 1980s New York wasn't just Wolfe's best book, it was the best bestselling fiction debut of the decade, a miraculously realistic study of an unbelievably status-mad society, from the fiery combatants of the South Bronx to the bubbling scum at the top of Wall Street. Sherman McCoy, a farcically arrogant investment banker (dubbed a "Master of the Universe," Wolfe's brilliant metaphorical co-opting of a then-important toy for...



In Advance of the Landing
Douglas Curran
0789207087
Mar 2001
(Hardcover) - Revised Ed.
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This selection of more than 60 photos (26 in color) depicts how saucer lore has permeated North American culture, from UFO-style houses in Chattanooga and Pensacola and a so-called abductee's "fiberglass replicas of the aliens who abducted her," to UFO-detection stations and a mural alongside Houston's Flying Saucer Pie Co. As Wolfe notes (in an introduction typographically designed in a saucer shape), Canadian photographer Curran has "discovered an exotic world," in which his subjects "struggle to rise above the plain facts of their lives here on Earth." Curran documents the artifacts and rituals of UFO cult grups, including efforts to summon UFOs with a "cosmic brain battery" and a "Welcome Space Brothers!" sign at a lonely "landing site." Overall, this is an amusing, deadpan look at UFO cultism that avoids...


Right Stuff
Tom Wolfe
0553381350
October 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Tom Wolfe began The Right Stuff at a time when it was unfashionable to contemplate American heroism. Nixon had left the White House in disgrace, the nation was reeling from the catastrophe of Vietnam, and in 1979--the year the book appeared--Americans were being held hostage by Iranian militants. Yet it was exactly the anachronistic courage of his subjects that captivated Wolfe. In his foreword, he notes that as late as 1970, almost one in four career Navy pilots died in accidents. "The Right Stuff," he explains, "became a story of why men were willing--willing?--delighted!--to take on such odds in this, an era literary people had long since characterized as the age of the anti-hero."

Wolfe's roots in New Journalism were intertwined with the nonfiction novel that Truman Capote had pioneered with In Cold Blood. As ...



Hooking Up
Tom Wolfe
0312420234
Oct 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Tom Wolfe's name is now so well known that the cover of his new collection bears just that: Tom Wolfe's name. No title, no picture, just the name, with an elegant design twining through it. Flip the thing on its side and you'll find that its title, Hooking Up, gives little idea of its function. But investigation soon reveals an oleo of reportage, fiction, and acrimonious name-calling. The latter, of course, makes for the best reading. In "My Three Stooges," Wolfe reviles the three big men of American letters--Updike, Mailer, and Irving--who cast aspersions on his second novel. Apparently, "the allergens for jealousy were present. Both Updike and Mailer had books out at the same time as A Man in Full, and theirs had sunk without a bubble. With Irving there was the Dickens factor." Wolfe gets in a lot of figures about...


The Bonfire of the Vanities
Tom Wolfe
0553275976
December 1990
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
Book Review
After Tom Wolfe defined the '60s in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and Radical Chic and Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and the cultural U-turn at the turn of the '80s in The Right Stuff, nobody thought he could ever top himself again. In 1987, when The Bonfire of the Vanities arrived, the literati called Wolfe an "aging enfant terrible."

He wasn't aging; he was growing up. Bonfire's pyrotechnic satire of 1980s New York wasn't just Wolfe's best book, it was the best bestselling fiction debut of the decade, a miraculously realistic study of an unbelievably status-mad society, from the fiery combatants of the South Bronx to the bubbling scum at the top of Wall Street. Sherman McCoy, a farcically arrogant investment banker (dubbed a "Master of the Universe," Wolfe's brilliant metaphorical co-opting of a then-important toy for...



Look Homeward, Angel
Thomas Wolfe
0684804433
October 1995
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Look Homeward, Angel is an elaborate and moving coming-of-age story about Eugene Gant, a restless and energetic character whose passion to experience life takes him from his small, rural hometown in North Carolina to Harvard University and the city of Boston. The novel's pattern is artfully simple -- a small town, a large family, high school and college -- yet the characters are monumental in their graphic individuality and personality. Through his rich, ornate prose, Wolfe evokes the extraordinarily vivid family of the Gants, and with equal detail, the remarkable peculiarities of small-town life and the pain and upheaval of a boy who must leave both. A classic work of American literature, Look Homeward, Angel is a passionate, stirring, and ...


The Critical Response to Tom Wolfe
Doug Shomette
0313277842
Aug 1992
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Author of The Right Stuff and other journalistic writings in a literary vein and the novel Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Wolfe has been lauded and vilified by the critics for breaking down the barriers between fact and fiction, journalism and literature, and for his stylistic idiosyncrasies. Doug Shomette here collects from four to eight representative reviews and critical commentary on each of Wolfe's eleven major works. A judicious introduction summarizes these fifty-four pieces as well as other notable critical reactions not reprinted. Also included is a chronology of important events in Wolfe's career, a bibliography of additional readings, and an index.

About the Author
DOUG SHOMETTE, a special agent with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in Dallas, Texas, is enrolled...


Mouthpiece: A Life in -- and Sometimes Just Outside -- the Law
Edward Hayes
0385511116
February 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Despite an effusive introduction by Tom Wolfe, who based the defense lawyer in The Bonfire of the Vanities on Hayes, many will be disappointed by this memoir. Hayes, a prominent attorney best known for his role in the Mafia cops case, has led a colorful life and deserves credit for overcoming a childhood that regularly featured beatings by his drunken father. The energetic, street-smart voice of the kid from working-class Queens who made good can be charming, but the blunt stereotypical statements and personal assessments are bound to offend: for example, "Latin women are the greatest gift God gave the world"; "she has the emotional range of a returned garment or a canceled sale at Bergdorf's." These flaws and the frequent dropping of prominent names overwhelm the genuinely dramatic experiences Hayes had - as a...


Tom Wolfe
Brian Abel Ragen
0313313830
Apr 2002
Hardcover
·
 
From School Library Journal
Grade 10 Up-Along with Truman Capote and Norman Mailer, Wolfe has pioneered the nonfiction novel, which blurs the lines between fiction and nonfiction. The first chapter is devoted to his life, and paints him as a unique and colorful figure who is known for his white suits and controversial explorations of various aspects of American social structure. The second chapter details Wolfe's place in contemporary literature, as a leading writer of New Journalism. Ragen does an excellent job of explaining the characteristics of realistic-fiction writing and of placing it in context. This section contains the most challenging material in an otherwise extremely accessible text. Subsequent chapters critically examine Wolfe's The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby, The Pump House Gang, The Electric Kool-Aid...


Hooking Up
Tom Wolfe
0374103828
Oct 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Tom Wolfe's name is now so well known that the cover of his new collection bears just that: Tom Wolfe's name. No title, no picture, just the name, with an elegant design twining through it. Flip the thing on its side and you'll find that its title, Hooking Up, gives little idea of its function. But investigation soon reveals an oleo of reportage, fiction, and acrimonious name-calling. The latter, of course, makes for the best reading. In "My Three Stooges," Wolfe reviles the three big men of American letters--Updike, Mailer, and Irving--who cast aspersions on his second novel. Apparently, "the allergens for jealousy were present. Both Updike and Mailer had books out at the same time as A Man in Full, and theirs had sunk without a bubble. With Irving there was the Dickens factor." Wolfe gets in a lot of figures about...


Grandfather: A Native American's Lifelong Search for Truth and Harmony with Nature
Tom Brown
042518174X
November 2001
Paperback
·
 
From School Library Journal
YA-Another in the list of Brown's wilderness/mysticism/ethos/survival books. This one takes readers through some of the most profound experiences of the old Apache of the title, who imparted to his grandson the wisdom expressed in the author's earlier titles. Going much deeper than nostalgia for a lost way of life, this work exhorts readers to eschew materialism and waste, and return to a simpler but more satisfying relationship with the fragile Earth. Grandfather is filled with visions and mystical phenomena as it relates the old man's search for the universal and sublime truths that will enable humankind to find harmony with nature.Judy McAloon, Potomac Branch, Prince Edward Public Library System, VACopyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition....

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