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Virginia Woolf: An Inner Life
Julia Briggs
0151011435
November 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. [Signature]Reviewed by Daphne MerkinThe famous question, surely, needs amending by now: who isn't afraid of Virginia Woolf—of writing about her, at least? Ever since this most singularly gifted of women, whose genius is as protean as it is profound, committed suicide at the age of 58 in 1941 at the height of her creative powers, her life and work has engendered an unremitting flow of books. These have included massively researched tomes and slender impressionistic volumes on every aspect of Woolf, from her pedigreed background and difficult Victorian childhood to her unconventional marriage to Leonard, the "penniless Jew," her Sapphic inclinations and the modernist Bloomsbury circle in which she moved. Certain subsets of questions—what was the particular nature of her mental illness?...


Robinson Crusoe
Daniel Defoe
0375757325
June 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Daniel Defoe relates the tale of an English sailor marooned on a desert island for nearly three decades. An ordinary man struggling to survive in extraordinary circumstances, Robinson Crusoe wrestles with fate and the nature of God. This edition features maps.

Inside Flap Copy
Daniel Defoe relates the tale of an English sailor marooned on a desert island for nearly three decades. An ordinary man struggling to survive in extraordinary circumstances, Robinson Crusoe wrestles with fate and the nature of God. This edition features maps.

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Virginia Woolf: Becoming a Writer
Katherine Dalsimer
0641695454

Hardcover
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Virginia Woolf
Hermione Lee
0375701362
October 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
"Woolf's story is reformulated by each generation," writes Hermione Lee, a professor of English literature. But her richly human portrait, so respectful of the complexities of her subject's life, seems unlikely to be surpassed. Lee extricates Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) from clichés about madness and modernism to reveal a vigorous artist whose work is politically probing as well as psychologically delicate. She makes brilliant use of the formidable Woolf archives to let the writer speak directly to us, then comments shrewdly on her words' hidden significances. Biographies don't get much better than this. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal
Before dismissing this new biography as just another in a long line of familar...


Virginia Woolf Tote Bag
Manufactured by Barnes & Noble Gifts
0641047150
January 2000
Other Format
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Room of One's Own
Virginia Woolf
0156787334
December 1989
Paperback
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Book Review
Surprisingly, this long essay about society and art and sexism is one of Woolf's most accessible works. Woolf, a major modernist writer and critic, takes us on an erudite yet conversational--and completely entertaining--walk around the history of women in writing, smoothly comparing the architecture of sentences by the likes of William Shakespeare and Jane Austen, all the while lampooning the chauvinistic state of university education in the England of her day. When she concluded that to achieve their full greatness as writers women will need a solid income and a privacy, Woolf pretty much invented modern feminist criticism.

From AudioFile
Another in Penguin's Virginia Woolf series featuring Atkins. This 1929 essay is perhaps the author's most important work--part feminist manifesto,...


The Waves
Virginia Woolf
0156949601
Jan 1950
Paperback
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From AudioFile
This narrative traces the lives and friendships of six childhood friends from their childhood to their old age. It tells of the friends' true feelings, which are often different from the ones they portray to each other. The narration is done in a light, airy poetic voice by Frances Jeater, who comforts the listener with her reading but fails to provide enough differentiation to the characters, making it difficult to know who is the focus of each point of the story. J.F.M. © AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Book Description
One of Woolf’s most experimental novels, The Waves presents six characters in monologue - from morning until night, from childhood into old...


The Hours
Michael Cunningham
0312305060
October 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
The Hours is both an homage to Virginia Woolf and very much its own creature. Even as Michael Cunningham brings his literary idol back to life, he intertwines her story with those of two more contemporary women. One gray suburban London morning in 1923, Woolf awakens from a dream that will soon lead to Mrs. Dalloway. In the present, on a beautiful June day in Greenwich Village, 52-year-old Clarissa Vaughan is planning a party for her oldest love, a poet dying of AIDS. And in Los Angeles in 1949, Laura Brown, pregnant and unsettled, does her best to prepare for her husband's birthday, but can't seem to stop reading Woolf. These women's lives are linked both by the 1925 novel and by the few precious moments of possibility each keeps returning to. Clarissa is to eventually realize: There's just this for consolation: an hour...


A Writer's Diary
Virginia Woolf
0156027917
Mar 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
An invaluable guide to the art and mind of Virginia Woolf, drawn by her husband from the personal record she kept over a period of twenty-seven years. Included are entries that refer to her own writing, others that are clearly writing exercises; accounts of people and scenes relevant to the raw material of her work; and comments on books she was reading. Edited and with a Preface by Leonard Woolf; Indices.


About the Author
Virginia Woolf (1882-1941), one of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, transformed the art of the novel with groundbreaking works such as Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse. The author of numerous collections of letters, journals, and short stories, she was an admired literary critic and a master of the essay form. A Writer's Diary was...


To the Lighthouse
Virginia Woolf
0156907399
December 1989
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. It's wondrous to listen to a fine reading of a long-loved novel. Leishman makes masterly use of volume, timbre and resonance to distinguish between characters and draw us into the emotional swings and vibrations of the internal musings of each. She creates not a new but a more nuanced reading, following the interwoven streams of consciousness in a British English that lends authenticity to each voice. Leishman swims smoothly through Woolf's sentences that ebb and flow with numerous parenthetical thoughts and fresh images. These passages are interspersed with quick, sharp, simple sentences that gain strength in contrast. Leishman also draws our attention to Woolf's poetic prose: her rhythms and images, her use of hard consonants in monosyllabic words in counterpoint to long, soft, dreamy words...


Mrs. Dalloway
Virginia Woolf
0151009988
Oct 2002
Hardcover
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Book Review
As Clarissa Dalloway walks through London on a fine June morning, a sky-writing plane captures her attention. Crowds stare upwards to decipher the message while the plane turns and loops, leaving off one letter, picking up another. Like the airplane's swooping path, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway follows Clarissa and those whose lives brush hers--from Peter Walsh, whom she spurned years ago, to her daughter Elizabeth, the girl's angry teacher, Doris Kilman, and war-shocked Septimus Warren Smith, who is sinking into madness.

As Mrs. Dalloway prepares for the party she is giving that evening, a series of events intrudes on her composure. Her husband is invited, without her, to lunch with Lady Bruton (who, Clarissa notes anxiously, gives the most amusing luncheons). Meanwhile, Peter Walsh appears, recently from India, to...



Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf
Edward Albee
0451158717
August 1988
Mass Market Paperback
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New York Times
Towers over the common run of contemporary plays.

New York Post
Albee can...be placed high among the important dramatists of the contemporary world theatre.

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The Mrs. Dalloway Reader
Virginia Woolf
0156030152
Nov 2004
Paperback
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From Booklist
How felicitous a pairing, that of Virginia Woolf--who elevated literature to glorious new heights with her glimmeringly beautiful prose and acute renderings of human consciousness but whose life has become the stuff of myth and speculation--and Francine Prose, a shrewd and thrilling novelist and insightful scholar of the creative process and women's lives. Prose's incisive introduction is worth the price of admission to this well-conceived study of the evolution and impact of Woolf's revolutionary novel, Mrs. Dalloway. Prose neatly characterizes what exactly Woolf achieves in this masterpiece, invaluable commentary that paves the way for Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway's Party, the sequence of seven stories that seeded the novel, and relevant entries from Woolf's diaries. Prose wisely includes the short story "The...


Night and Day (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Virginia Woolf
1593082126
March 2005
Paperback
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From AudioFile
Insightful yet fun, Woolf's story depicts the dance of romance between couples and a young woman's struggle for identity through mind and heart. Sardonic wit and humor earmark the works of Virginia Woolf; Night and Day with its bright characters is no exception. Flo Gibson, however, seems to miss the mark in its presentation. Although the characters are competently portrayed, Gibson glosses over the ironic humor underlying the text, leaving the reading stilted and dry. Poor pacing also contributes to the mediocrity of this presentation. Gibson's painstakingly slow consistency doesn't reflect Woolf's complex lingerings and accelerations. Because of this, the book drags in places it shouldn't. Rife with potential, Night and Day is a good choice for audio, but this particular performance doesn't do it justice. J.S.G. ...


Mrs. Dalloway
Virginia Woolf
0156628708
September 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
As Clarissa Dalloway walks through London on a fine June morning, a sky-writing plane captures her attention. Crowds stare upwards to decipher the message while the plane turns and loops, leaving off one letter, picking up another. Like the airplane's swooping path, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway follows Clarissa and those whose lives brush hers--from Peter Walsh, whom she spurned years ago, to her daughter Elizabeth, the girl's angry teacher, Doris Kilman, and war-shocked Septimus Warren Smith, who is sinking into madness.

As Mrs. Dalloway prepares for the party she is giving that evening, a series of events intrudes on her composure. Her husband is invited, without her, to lunch with Lady Bruton (who, Clarissa notes anxiously, gives the most amusing luncheons). Meanwhile, Peter Walsh appears, recently from India, to...



Moll Flanders
Daniel Defoe
0375760105
June 2002
Paperback
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Review
“Defoe’s excellence it is, to make me forget my specific class, character, and circumstances, and to raise me while I read him, into the universal man.” —Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Review
?Defoe?s excellence it is, to make me forget my specific class, character, and circumstances, and to raise me while I read him, into the universal man.? ?Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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