Book Finder
    
 
> Literature & Fiction > Classics > Latin American Classics
 

Memories of a Cuban Kitchen : More Than 200 Classic Recipes
Mary Urrutia Randelman, Joan Schwartz
0028609980
April 25, 1996
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
"Most Cubans will tell you that we have two food groups: party food--made up of snacks--and real food, built around fish, stews and soups," write menu consultant Randleman and editor Schwartz. "We seem to consume more of the former." In 1957, when Randleman herself was 10 years old, her prosperous family emigrated to Miami from Cuba. Her memories of pre-Castro life and eating are filtered through a golden haze of childhood recollection: cousin Pepe entertains his family at meriendasic (afternoon tea), in which "steaming trays began appearing from the kitchen, borne by a parade of indulgent maids and cooks," and glamorous Aunt Titi drives the young Randelman to the Havana Yacht Club for incomparable freshly fried potato chips and croquetassic "filled with smoky creamed ham and splashed with lime juice." The Cuban...


Twenty Love Poems
Pablo Neruda
0140186484
Feb 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This collection of poems, first published by Neruda at the age of 19 in 1924, caused something of a scandal because of its frank and intense sexuality: "I have gone marking the atlas of your body / with crosses of fire. / My mouth went across: a spider, trying to hide. / In you, behind you, timid, driven by thirst." It later became one of Neruda's best-loved works, selling two million copies by the 1960s. Why? With image after arresting image, Neruda charts the oceanic movements of passion, repeatedly summoning imagery of the sea and weather: "On all sides I see your waist of fog, / and your silence hunts down my afflicted hours; / my kisses anchor, and my moist desire nests / in you with your arms of transparent stone." As irresistible as the sea, love is engulfing ("You swallowed everything, like distance. / ....


House of the Spirits
Isabel Allende
0553273914
August 1986
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
--Christian Science Monitor
"Emocionante y ponderosa....La casa de los espiritusestá repleta de mujeres maravillosas e inolvidables, que confieren una dimensión especial al libro." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Review
"Extraordinary... Powerful... Sharply observant, witty and eloquent." -- Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times

"Mesmerizing... A novel of force and charm." -- The Washington Post

"That rarest of successes -- a book about one family and one country that is a book about the world and becomes the world in a book." -- Cosmopolitan

"Nothing short of astonishing... In The House Of The Spirits Isabelle Allende has indeed shown us the relationships between...


The Cambridge History of Spanish Literature
David T. Gies (Editor)
0521806186
January 13, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
"This impressive history of the literature of Spain sets a new standard of excellence. Essential." CHOICE July 2005

"Gies has chosen an eminent group of scholars from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Spain to collaborate with him on the project, and the result is an incisive, throough, and varied presentation of texts, authors, currents, and movements...They negotiate the old and the new with relative ease. Their scholarly criteria are rigorous, and their subjective critical acumen becomes part of the frame. Along with the factual information that is associated with manuals of literature, this history bears the imprint of distinct and compelling analytical processes. The book is an admirable reference tool and a treat to read." -Renaissance Quarterly, Edward H. Friedman, Vanderbilt University

"David T....



Cuba Classics
Christopher P. Baker
1566565464
Aug 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In this paean to the vintage car, Baker, who has also provided the photos, juxtaposes American autos against the backdrop of Cuba to great effect. "Today, Cuba possesses about 450,000 cars, of which one-sixth are pre-revolutionary American autos dating back to the ’20s and ’30s," he writes. Most of the cars pictured here, however, come from the 1950s: a pristine-looking green 1950 Chevrolet Styline Bel-Air is parked alongside a gray, weathered house; in the foreground an old man in a straw hat walks by eating from two ice cream cones. Not all of the photos are of the best quality (there are random, grainy pictures of people on the streets and free-frame photos of cars in motion), but overall, the photos effectively capture the beauty of the vintage cars themselves as well as the country that keeps them...


How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents
Julia Alvarez
0452268060
June 1992
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Fifteen tales vividly chronicle a Dominican family's exile in the Bronx, focusing on the four Garcia daughters' rebellion against their immigrant elders. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
YA-- This sensitive story of four sisters who must adjust to life in America after having to flee from the Dominican Republic is told through a series of episodes beginning in adulthood, when their lives have been shaped by U. S. mores, and moving backwards to their wealthy childhood on the island. Adapting to American life is difficult and causes embarrassment when friends meet their parents, anger as they are bullied and called "spics," and identity confusion following summer trips to the family compound in the Dominican Republic. These...


Facundo
Domingo F. Sarmiento
0140436774
Oct 1998
Paperback
·
 


Bless Me, Ultima
Rudolfo A. Anaya
0446600253
May 1995
Mass Market Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Besides winning the Premio Quinto Sol national Chicano literary award, this novel of a young boy in New Mexico in the 1940s has sold more than 300,000 copies in paperback since its 1973 debut. Here, however, the book gets the hardcover treatment, with a few illustrations added for color. LJ's reviewer asserted that "the novel has warmth and feeling" (LJ 2/1/73) and a place in all fiction collections, especially those serving Chicano populations.Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair : (Dual Language Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition) (Penguin Classics Deluxe Editio)
Pablo Neruda, et al
0142437700
December 2, 2003
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This collection of poems, first published by Neruda at the age of 19 in 1924, caused something of a scandal because of its frank and intense sexuality: "I have gone marking the atlas of your body / with crosses of fire. / My mouth went across: a spider, trying to hide. / In you, behind you, timid, driven by thirst." It later became one of Neruda's best-loved works, selling two million copies by the 1960s. Why? With image after arresting image, Neruda charts the oceanic movements of passion, repeatedly summoning imagery of the sea and weather: "On all sides I see your waist of fog, / and your silence hunts down my afflicted hours; / my kisses anchor, and my moist desire nests / in you with your arms of transparent stone." As irresistible as the sea, love is engulfing ("You swallowed everything, like distance. / ....


Selected Writings
Jose Marti
0142437042
Apr 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
José Martí (1853-1895) is the most renowned political and literary figure in the history of Cuba. A poet, essayist, orator, statesman, abolitionist, and the martyred revolutionary leader of Cuba's fight for independence from Spain, Martí lived in exile in New York for most of his adult life, earning his living as a foreign correspondent. Throughout the 1880s and early 1890s, Martí's were the eyes through which much of Latin America saw the United States. His impassioned, kaleidoscopic evocations of that period in U.S. history, the assassination of James Garfield, the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, the execution of the Chicago anarchists, the lynching of the Italians in New Orleans, and much more, bring it rushing back to life. Organized chronologically, this collection begins with his...


Down These Mean Streets
Piri Thomas
0679781420
November 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The 30th anniversary edition of this classic memoir about growing up in Spanish Harlem includes an afterword reminding us that its streets are even meaner now, thanks to crack cocaine and the dismantling of government poverty programs. As a dark-skinned Puerto Rican, born in 1928, Piri Thomas faced with painful immediacy the absurd contradictions of America's racial attitudes (among people of all colors) in a time of wrenching social change. Three decades have not dimmed the luster of his jazzy prose, rich in Hispanic rhythms and beat-generation slang.

Review
"Piri Thomas describes the passionate, painful search to validate his manhood...He has done it all in Harlem's mean streets and gone on from machismo to manhood, acquiring during the journey an understanding of...


The Conquest of New Spain (Penguin Classics)
Bernal Diaz del Castillo, John M. Cohen (Introduction)
0140441239
August 30, 1963
Paperback
·
 


The Posthumous Memoirs of Br'as Cubas (Library of Latin America)
Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, et al
0195101707
December 10, 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Fans of Latin American literature will be thrilled by Oxford University Press's new translations of works by 19th-century Brazilian author Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. His novels are both heartbreaking and comic; his limning of a colonial Brazil in flux is both perceptive and remarkably modern. The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas is written as an autobiography, a chronicle of the erotic misadventures of its narrator, Brás Cubas--who happens to be dead. In pursuit of love and progeny, Cubas rejects the women who want him and aspires to the ones who reject him. In the end, he dies unloved and without heirs, yet he somehow manages to turn this bitter pill into a victory of sorts. What makes Memoirs stand up 100 years after the book was written is Machado's biting humor, brilliant prose, and profound ...


Como agua para chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate)
Laura Esquivel
0385721234
March 2001
Paperback
·
 
Review
"A delightful first novel... the fragrant story makes you dream of love and want your supper too." --Glamour.

"A mystical Mexican love story... [that] will charm the palate and the heart." -- USA Today.

"A tall-tale, fairy-tale, soap-opera and home-remedy handbook all rolled into one." -- San Francisco Chronicle.


From the Paperback edition.

Review
"A delightful first novel... the fragrant story makes you dream of love and want your supper too." --Glamour.

"A mystical Mexican love story... [that] will charm the palate and the heart." -- USA Today.

"A tall-tale, fairy-tale, soap-opera and home-remedy handbook all rolled into one." -- San Francisco Chronicle. --This text...


Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses
Isabel Allende
0060930179
May 1, 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
There is something about reading suggestive material that awakens the senses--too often ignored in the fray of modern life--and fires the imagination. Perhaps it brings us back to those breathless, palpitating moments from childhood when puberty was a rosy smudge on the horizon and sex was an abstract term. Aphrodite is a long, savory, enthralling ode to sensuality.

In this bawdy memoir-cum-cookbook, Allende has put together an apothecary of aphrodisiacs, from snake's blood and rhinoceros horn to the more commonplace and more palatable oysters, "those seductive tears of the sea, which lend themselves to slipping from mouth to mouth like a prolonged kiss ... can be purchased in bottles, but there they look like malignant tumors; in contrast, moist and turgid in their shells they suggest delicate vulvae--a prime...



La casa de los esp¿ritus (The House of the Spirits)
Isabel Allende
0060951303
May 1995
Paperback
·
 
--Christian Science Monitor
"Emocionante y ponderosa....La casa de los espiritusestá repleta de mujeres maravillosas e inolvidables, que confieren una dimensión especial al libro."

--Newsweek
"Un romance tan extenso como regocijador."

See all Editorial Reviews


Labyrinths: Selected Stories and Other Writings (New Directions Paperbook, 186)
Jorge Luis Borges, et al
0811200124
June 1964
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
If Jorge Luis Borges had been a computer scientist, he probably would have invented hypertext and the World Wide Web.

Instead, being a librarian and one of the world's most widely read people, he became the leading practitioner of a densely layered imaginistic writing style that has been imitated throughout this century, but has no peer (although Umberto Eco sometimes comes close, especially in Name of the Rose). Borges's stories are redolent with an intelligence, wealth of invention, and a tight, almost mathematically formal style that challenge with mysteries and paradoxes revealed only slowly after several readings. Highly recommended to anyone who wants their imagination and intellect to be aswarm with philosophical plots, compelling conundrums, and a wealth of real and imagined literary references derived...



I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala
Rigoberta Menchu
0860917886
August 1987
Textbook Paperback
·
 
From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
"This is my testimony. I didn't learn it from a book and I didn't learn it alone... My personal experience is the reality of a whole people." Born in the mountains of Guatemala into the Quiche, one of twenty-three mestizo groups, Rigoberta Menchu tells her story. The Quiche people's spirituality, much of which must not be told to outsiders, affirms community responsibility for village children and intensely personal relationships with the land and the natural world. The celebration of her ancient culture is all that strengthens in the face of a brutally repressed and poverty-stricken existence. Two of her brothers die as infants from malnutrition. When the Quiche begin their fight to keep the government and big-business people from stealing any more of their land, her family is...


Quincas Borba
Joaquim Maria Machado De Assis
0195106822
Apr 1999
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Machado de Assis's 1891 novel is one of four new volumes in Oxford's "Library of Latin America." The plot follows protagonist Rubiao, who moves from the country to Rio de Janeiro along with his dog, Quincas Borba. In the city he finds himself thrust into the thick of Brazilian politics and social complexities. In addition to the text, this Oxford edition offers a scholarly introduction and an afterword.Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews
A graceful new translation of a major (1891) novel by the master ironist (18391908) who remains Brazil's greatest writer of fiction. ``Quincas Borba'' denotes not only the eponymous (possibly mad) ``philosopher'' whose credo of...


Chronicle of a Death Foretold
Gabriel Garc¿a M¿rquez
140003471X
October 2003
Paperback
·
 
Review
“Exquisitely harrowing . . . very strange and brilliantly conceived . . .a sort of metaphysical murder mystery.”—The New York Times Book Review

“This investigation of an ancient murder takes on the quality of a hallucinatory exploration, a deep, groping search into the gathering darkness of human intentions for a truth that continually slithers away.” –The New York Review of Books

“Brilliant . . . A small masterpiece . . . we can almost see, smell and hear Garcia Marquez’s Caribbean backwater and its inhabitants.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“As pungent and memorable as a sharp spice, an examination of the nature of complicity and fate . . . an exquisite performance.” –The Christian Science...


Martin Rivas
Alberto Blest Gana
0195107144
Jan 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
A Chilean statesman, mathematician, and writer, Blest Gana (1830-1920) founded the Latin American documentary social novel and dashed off impressive prose works that mined the strata of Santiago society from the heady days of its independence to its lackluster fin-de-siecle. In 1850, his ambitious but reflective and level-headed young protagonist, Martin Rivas--son of an adventurous prospector in Chile's northern district who lost his fortune searching for an illusory mother lode--heads south for the capital precisely when the Chilean economy is booming. Upon his deathbed, Martin's father entrusts him to the Santiago household of his now wealthy former business partner. Here, Martin falls in love with his guardian's haughty daughter, Leonor. Their agonizing but ultimately successful romance reflects the author's...


Cien A¿os de Soledad
Gabriel Garc¿a M¿rquez
843760494X
December 1994
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
A dense jungle of magic and literary gusto, this book pulls you in and engulfs you with its richness and beauty. Saying it is a story of a family is like saying the New Testament is a book about a carpenter. Following the family here reveals the history of several generations, and the passions, thoughts, and myths of a labyrinth of people, related and not. Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a gifted writer, and nowhere does he write with the fervor that he does in One Hundred Years of Solitude, a pleasurable ride unmatched in modern literature. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

The New York Times Book Review, Robert Kiely
Though concocted of quirks, ancient mysteries, family secrets and peculiar contradictions, it makes sense and gives pleasure in dozens of...


Hispano-Americana: Introduccion a LA Literatura De LA Conquista Al Siglo XX
Gladys M. Varona-Lacey
0844276790
June 1997
Paperback
·
 
From Library Journal
Designed for students, this one-volume introductory anthology of Latin American literature includes a thoughtful selection of the most representative authors and their works in a well-organized and easy-to-read format. A variety of themes and styles appear, with chapters from novels, essays, poetry, plays, letters, and diaries. Biographical information about each author is supplemented by reading guidelines and a synopsis. The book is divided into three sections: "Conquistas y colonia" explores the works of such early figures as Columbus, Bernal Diaz del Castillo, and el Inca Garcilaso. "Independencia politica, literaria y cultural" includes Simon Bolivar, Jose Marti, Ruben Dario, and others. The final section, "Precursores y contemporaneos," introduces 20th-century authors such as Jorge Luis Borges, Pablo Neruda,...


Torn from the Nest
Clorinda Matto de Turner
0195110064
Apr 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The Peruvian President praised her; the Church excommunicated her; angry mobs rampaged through her house and press. Clearly, writer, publisher, and reformer Clorinda Matto de Turner possessed a knack for igniting both enthusiasm and outrage in her 19th-century audience. The latest installment in Oxford University Press's acclaimed Library of Latin America series, her novel Torn from the Nest may excite a little less protest now than it did in 1889, but it remains a radical document in many ways: in its nascent feminism, its impassioned defense of indigenous rights, and most especially in its critique of Church corruption and advocacy of married Catholic clergy.

Translated into English for the first time since 1904, this seminal Latin American novel uses a time-tested plot--a star-crossed romance between a member of the...



The Pursuit of the Millennium : Revolutionary Millenarians and Mystical Anarchists of the Middle Ages (Galaxy Books)
Norman Cohn
0195004566
May 15, 1970
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
At the end of the first millennium A.D., itinerant preachers crisscrossed Europe warning that the end of the world was nigh. Hundreds of thousands of people took heed, joining religious cults and anti-governmental militias in preparation for the coming war between good and evil. (If this sounds familiar, it is proof only that history is cyclical.) During this heady time, Europe exploded in religious war, peasant revolts and sectarian strife, marked by the first large-scale massacres of Jews and gypsies, the first inklings of inquisitions and holy crusades. Norman Cohn, a masterful writer and interpreter, carefully explores this extraordinary period in European history in a book that bears rereading as our own millennium approaches its end.

Book Description
The end of the millennium...


The Magic Lantern
Jose Tomas De Cuellar
0195115031
Jan 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Booklist
Oxford's Library of Latin America series is devoted to bringing the best of Central and South American literature to a North American audience; often these works are being translated into English for the first time. De Cuellar's The Magic Lantern provides a sardonic look at the manners of late-nineteenth-century Mexico in two novellas. The first, "Having a Ball," chronicles the planning of a party, hosted by a family among Mexico City's burgeoning nouveaux riches. The family, not knowing any of the "best" families but nonetheless wanting them to be invited, leaves the planning of the ball to a servant. The best families turn out to be the worst mannered, the house gets trashed, and reputations are ruined in this look at Mexican families adhering to European pretenses. "Christmas Eve" is an ambitious, short novella...


One Hundred Years of Solitude
Gabriel Garc¿a M¿rquez
0060531045
June 2003
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
"Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice."

It is typical of Gabriel García Márquez that it will be many pages before his narrative circles back to the ice, and many chapters before the hero of One Hundred Years of Solitude, Buendía, stands before the firing squad. In between, he recounts such wonders as an entire town struck with insomnia, a woman who ascends to heaven while hanging laundry, and a suicide that defies the laws of physics: A trickle of blood came out under the door, crossed the living room, went out into the street, continued on in a straight line across the uneven terraces, went down steps and climbed over curbs, passed along the Street of the Turks,...


  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.