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Europe Central
William T. Vollmann
0143036599
November 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In the small set of America's best contemporary novelists, Vollmann is the perpetual comet. Every two years or so he flashes across the sky with another incredibly learned, incredibly written, incredibly long novel. Two years ago, with Argall, he easily bested John Barth in the writing of 17th-century prose while taking up the tired story of the settlement of Jamestown and making it absolutely riveting. His latest departs from his usual themes--the borders between natives and Westerners, or prostitutes and johns--to take on Central Europe in the 20th century. "The winged figures on the bridges of Berlin are now mostly flown, for certain things went wrong in Europe...." What went wrong is captured in profiles of real persons (Kathe Kollwitz, Kurt Gerstein, Dmitri Shostakovich, General Paulus and General Vlasov) as...


The Cambridge Introduction to Russian Poetry
Michael Wachtel
0521004934
Aug 2004
Paperback
·
 
Review
"...an excellent companion...The volume is written in an especially accessible prose...Highly recommended." N. Tittler, SUNY at Binghamton, CHOICE

"An informative, revelatory, and engrossing read for anyone excited about Russian poetry, The Cambridge Introduction to Russian Poetry deserves to become an instant classic." The Russian Review, Alyssa Dinega Gillespie, University of Notre Dame

Book Description
Including examples from Russia's greatest poets, Michael Wachtel draws on three centuries of verse, from the beginnings of secular literature in the eighteenth century to the present day. The first part of his book is devoted to concepts such as versification, poetic language and tradition. In the second part he examines the ode, the elegy, love poetry, nature poetry and patriotic...



A Life in Letters (Penguin Classics)
Anton Chekhov, et al
0140449221
September 28, 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
From his teenage years in provincial Russia to his premature death in 1904, Anton Chekhov wrote thousands of letters to a wide range of correspondents. This fascinating new selection tells Chekhov’s story as a man and a writer through affectionate bulletins to his family, insightful discussions of literature with publishers and theater directors, and tender love letters to his actress wife. Vividly evoking landscapes, people, and his daily life, the letters offer revealing glimpses into Chekhov’s preoccupations—the onset of tuberculosis, his dual careers as doctor and writer, and his ambivalence about his growing reputation as Russia’s foremost playwright and author. This volume takes us inside the mind of one of the world’s greatest writers, and the character that emerges from...


Eugene Onegin : A Novel in Verse (Oxford World's Classics)
Alexander Pushkin, James E. Falen
0192838997
October 22, 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s Russia, Pushkin's verse novel follows the fates of three men and three women. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it also portrays a large cast of other
characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and this new translation conveys the literal sense and the poetic music of the original.


The Winter Queen
Boris Akunin
0812968778
March 2004
Paperback
·
 
From AudioFile
Erast Fandorin, a government clerk turned detective, makes for an unlikely but gifted sleuth in late nineteenth-century Russia. The latest Akunin mystery spans the European continent and involves a major conspiracy. Campbell Scott reads with a composed and collected voice befitting the protagonist's calm and intellect. As Scott subtly alters his voice, his even pace and enthusiasm bring each character to life. His low-key reading is the perfect pairing for the character of Fandorin, bringing to light the hero's naïveté and indignation over the crimes committed and the people involved. Even Akunin's sly humor is highlighted through Scott's rendition, bringing to the U.S. a welcome introduction to the Russian sleuth. H.L.S. © AudioFile 2004, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland,...


Contemporary Russian Poetry
Gerald S. Smith
025320769X
May 1993
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Smith's ( Songs to Seven Strings ) collection of contemporary Russian poetry should be useful to anyone with a serious interest in work produced during recent years both by poets living in the U.S.S.R. and by prominent Third Wave emigres. He has selected the work of 23 poets loosely linked through their use of technical formalism (which is the norm among Russian poets) and through the moral questioning that has long dominated Russian poetry. The volume begins appropriately with the cautionary words of Boris Slutsky (1919-1986): "Any beginning is the beginning of the end. / That's why we begin with an egg, / but end up with a smashed shell. . . ." The youngest poet in the anthology, Aleksei Parshchikov (b. 1954), lives today in Palo Alto, Calif., and his work pitches an interesting echo: "After all, our names are...


Europe Central
William T. Vollmann
0670033928
March 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In the small set of America's best contemporary novelists, Vollmann is the perpetual comet. Every two years or so he flashes across the sky with another incredibly learned, incredibly written, incredibly long novel. Two years ago, with Argall, he easily bested John Barth in the writing of 17th-century prose while taking up the tired story of the settlement of Jamestown and making it absolutely riveting. His latest departs from his usual themes--the borders between natives and Westerners, or prostitutes and johns--to take on Central Europe in the 20th century. "The winged figures on the bridges of Berlin are now mostly flown, for certain things went wrong in Europe...." What went wrong is captured in profiles of real persons (Kathe Kollwitz, Kurt Gerstein, Dmitri Shostakovich, General Paulus and General Vlasov) as...


The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova
Anna Akhmatova, Roberta Reeder (Editor)
0939010275
September 1, 2000
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This comprehensive English-only edition of the great Russian poet's works has been expanded to include 80 newly discovered poems. Illustrated. Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal
These two fat volumes, a 100th-anniversary tribute to the great Russian poet Akhmatova (1889-1966), are clearly a labor of love. Editor Reeder's book-length introduction is a meticulous, well-documented account of the poet's life and poetry through the ebullience of modernist Petersburg, the grim deprivation of two world wars and the 1917 revolutions, the poverty and repression (including the repeated imprisonment of her son) of the interwar years and the vicious official attacks after World War II, and the last years of international honors. This life has made...


The Heritage of Russian Verse
Dimitri Obolensky
0253327369
Apr 1976
Paperback
·
 
Language Notes
Text: English, Russian (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Everything Is Illuminated
Jonathan Safran Foer
0060529709
March 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
The simplest thing would be to describe Everything Is Illuminated, Jonathan Safran Foer's accomplished debut, as a novel about the Holocaust. It is, but that really fails to do justice to the sheer ambition of this book. The main story is a grimly familiar one. A young Jewish American--who just happens to be called Jonathan Safran Foer--travels to the Ukraine in the hope of finding the woman who saved his grandfather from the Nazis. He is aided in his search by Alex Perchov, a naïve Ukrainian translator, Alex's grandfather (also called Alex), and a flatulent mongrel dog named Sammy Davis Jr. Jr. On their journey through Eastern Europe's obliterated landscape they unearth facts about the Nazi atrocities and the extent of Ukrainian complicity that have implications for Perchov as well as Safran Foer. This narrative is...


Reinventing Romantic Poetry
Diana Greene
0299191044
Oct 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Reinventing Romantic Poetry offers a new look at the Russian literary scene in the nineteenth century. While celebrated poets such as Aleksandr Pushkin worked within a male-centered Romantic aesthetic-the poet as a bard or sexual conqueror; nature as a mother or mistress; the poet's muse as an idealized woman-Russian women attempting to write Romantic poetry found they had to reinvent poetic conventions of the day to express themselves as women and as poets. Comparing the poetry of fourteen men and fourteen women from this period, Diana Greene revives and redefines the women's writings and offers a thoughtful examination of the sexual politics of reception and literary reputation. The fourteen women considered wrote poetry in every genre, from visions to verse tales, from love lyrics to metaphysical poetry, as well as...


Hope Against Hope: A Memoir
Nadezhda Mandelstam, Max Hayward (Introduction)
0375753168
March 30, 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
Nadezhda means "hope" in Russian. And Nadezhda Mandelstam, wife of Osip Mandelstam, one of the greatest Russian poets of the 20th century, is aptly named, for it is hope alone that seems to have buoyed her strength during very trying times. In this, the first of two volumes of her memoirs, she offers a harrowing account of the last four years she spent with her late husband. She re-creates in terse, stripped-to-the-bone sentences the atmosphere of intense paranoia that enveloped Russia's literary intelligentsia. In 1933, Osip had written a lighthearted satire ridiculing Stalin. It proved to be a 16-line death sentence. Nadezhda recalls the night the secret police came for him: "There was a sharp, unbearably explicit knock on the door. 'They've come for Osip,' I said." He was arrested, interrogated, exiled, and eventually...


Rereading Russian Poetry
Stephanie Sandler
0300071493
Apr 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
In this provocative book Elyn R. Saks focuses closely on what hermeneutic psychoanalysis is, how psychoanalysts- approaches to it differ, and how patients respond to the various interpretive models of treatment. Saks defines and analyzes five models, arriving at important conclusions about what aspects of psychoanalytic treatment patients should accept and what they should reject.

Card catalog description
Russia's poets hold a special place in Russian culture, perhaps revealing more about their country than poets within any other nation. In this unique and wide-ranging collection of writings on poets and poetic trends in Russia, contributors from the United States, Britain, and Russia examine the place of poetry in Russian culture. Through a variety of critical approaches,...


The Russian Debutante's Handbook
Gary Shteyngart
064170285X

Hardcover
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Flint On A Bright Stone: A Revolution Of Precision And Restraint In American, Russian, And German Modernism (Verbal Art: Studies in Poetics)
Kirsten Blythe Painter
0804750750
December 28, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
"Flint on a Bright Stone" closes a significant gap in the history of Modernist poetry by identifying the existence of "Tempered Modernism," which blossomed in the first two decades of the twentieth century, and was exemplified by the early works of Akhmatova, Rilke, H. D., and Williams. While the international nature of Radical Modernism, such as Futurism, Expressionism, and Dadaism, has been well documented, the connections among Tempered Modernists have been ignored. This is the first book to delineate thoroughly the international nature of this phenomenon—an evolutionary alternative to the revolutionary Futurist techniques of shock and rupture. Tempered Modernists sought newness through precision, palpability, equilibrium, and restraint, crafting small poems that found beauty in the subdued, ordinary, and...


Snow
Orhan Pamuk
0375706860
July 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A Turkish poet who spent 12 years as a political exile in Germany witnesses firsthand the clash between radical Islam and Western ideals in this enigmatically beautiful novel. Ka's reasons for visiting the small Turkish town of Kars are twofold: curiosity about the rash of suicides by young girls in the town and a hope to reconnect with "the beautiful Ipek," whom he knew as a youth. But Kars is a tangle of poverty-stricken families, Kurdish separatists, political Islamists (including Ipek's spirited sister Kadife) and Ka finds himself making compromises with all in a desperate play for his own happiness. Ka encounters government officials, idealistic students, leftist theater groups and the charismatic and perhaps terroristic Blue while trying to convince Ipek to return to Germany with him; each conversation pits...


The Akhmatova Journals: 1938-41
Lydia Chukovskaya, et al
0374223424


·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Russian poet Anna Akhmatova (1889-1966), described by Chukovskaya as "famous and neglected, strong and helpless . . . a statue of grief, loneliness, pride, courage," springs vividly to life in this fragmentary diary. Chukovskaya, a fellow Russian writer who revered and befriended Akhmatova, recorded from memory their almost daily conversations in Leningrad. Along with animated discussions of Boris Pasternak, Osip Mandelstam, Aleksandr Blok, Freud, Joyce and many contemporaneous Russian writers, their talks contain veiled intimations of Akhmatova's fear and loathing of Stalin's terrorist police state. This installment of the diary concludes with the two friends evacuating besieged, war-torn Leningrad by train to Tashkent. Norman's stunning translations of 54 of Akhmatova's poems, while faithful to their...


Crossroad of Arts, Crossroad of Cultures
Masha Rubins
0312229518
Dec 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Review
"...the book makes for interesting reading because of the wealth of examples it presents from both well-known and obscure texts."


Eugene Onegin
Alexander Pushkin
0140448039
April 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Translated by Charles Johnston with an Introduction and Notes by Michael Basker.


Eugene Onegin
Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin (Author), Vladimir Nabokov (Translator)
0691019053
January 1, 1991
Paperback
·
 
Review
Perhaps [Nabokov's] ultimate masterpiece.

Book Description

"In an era of inept and ignorant imitations, whose piped-in background music has hypnotized innocent readers into fearing literality's salutary jolt, some reviewers were upset by the humble fidelity of my version. . . ." Such was Vladimir Nabokov's response to the storm of controversy aroused by the first edition of his literal translation of Eugene Onegin. This bold rendering of the Russian masterpiece, together with Nabokov's detailed and witty commentary, is itself a work of enduring literary interest, and reflects a lifelong admiration for Pushkin on the part of one of this century's most brilliant stylists.



A Part of Speech
Joseph Brodsky
0374516332
Apr 1985
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
A Part of Speech contains poems from the years 1965-1978, translated by various hands.


Poems of Akhmatova : Izbrannye Stikhi
Anna Akhmatova, et al
0395860032
May 30, 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Witness to the international and domestic chaos of the first half of the twentieth century, Anna Akhmatova (1888-1966) chronicled Russia's troubled times in poems of sharp beauty and intensity. Her genius is now universally acknowledged, and recent biographies attest to a remarkable resurgence of interest in her poetry in this country. Here is the essence of Akhmatova - a landmark selection and translation, including excerpts from "Poem with a Hero."

Language Notes
Text: English, Russian (translation)
Original Language: Russian


Snow
Orhan Pamuk
0375406972
August 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
A Turkish poet who spent 12 years as a political exile in Germany witnesses firsthand the clash between radical Islam and Western ideals in this enigmatically beautiful novel. Ka's reasons for visiting the small Turkish town of Kars are twofold: curiosity about the rash of suicides by young girls in the town and a hope to reconnect with "the beautiful Ipek," whom he knew as a youth. But Kars is a tangle of poverty-stricken families, Kurdish separatists, political Islamists (including Ipek's spirited sister Kadife) and Ka finds himself making compromises with all in a desperate play for his own happiness. Ka encounters government officials, idealistic students, leftist theater groups and the charismatic and perhaps terroristic Blue while trying to convince Ipek to return to Germany with him; each conversation pits...


An Age Ago
Alan Myers
0374520844
Sept 1988
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This newly translated anthology of 11 19th-century Russian poets will both delight and educate readers interested in Russian literature and history. The poems are accessible today primarily because they focus on such universal metaphysical and private issues as love, time, aging, jealousy, war, nature and death. Lyrical, strictly structured with traditional rhyme schemes and meters, the verse is an unusual combination of Romantic language and subject matter and rational theory stemming from the Age of Enlightenment. The anthology balances political, philosophical and personal poems nicely, and the selections complement each other, displaying the individual styles of the authors as well as their common concerns. The poets represented range from the well-known Aleksandr Pushkin and Mikhail Lermontov to the less...


The Cambridge Introduction to Russian Poetry
Michael Wachtel
0521808812
Aug 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Review
"...an excellent companion...The volume is written in an especially accessible prose...Highly recommended." N. Tittler, SUNY at Binghamton, CHOICE

"An informative, revelatory, and engrossing read for anyone excited about Russian poetry, The Cambridge Introduction to Russian Poetry deserves to become an instant classic." The Russian Review, Alyssa Dinega Gillespie, University of Notre Dame

Book Description
Including examples from Russia's greatest poets, Michael Wachtel draws on three centuries of verse, from the beginnings of secular literature in the eighteenth century to the present day. The first part of his book is devoted to concepts such as versification, poetic language and tradition. In the second part he examines the ode, the elegy, love poetry, nature poetry and patriotic...



Moscow Memoirs : MEMORIES OF ANNA AKHMATOVA, OSIP MANDELSTAM, AND LITERARY RUSSIA UNDER STALIN
Emma Gerstein
1585675954
September 2, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Born to a man who became a high-ranking Soviet physician, Gerstein (1903–2002) rebelled against her father’s political affiliations early on. After a string of unsatisfying jobs, she followed a desire to write, establishing herself as a literary scholar and ensconcing herself among the literati of Soviet Russia. Her life changed dramatically in 1928, when she met Mandelstam and his wife, Nadezhda; Gerstein now had access to a quite famous living poet and his circle of friends, eventually including Akhmatova. The group suffered through the political woes of the time but also reveled in its literary excitement. Weaving biographical threads with autobiographical filaments, as well as selections from the poetry and letters of these two Soviet literary giants, Gerstein offers insightful glimpses into their...


Anna of All the Russias: A Life of Anna Akhmatova
Elaine Feinstein
1400040892
March 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
By the time the famed Russian poet Anna Akhmatova died in 1966, at the age of 77, she had witnessed the colossal changes that overtook Russia, from the last days of the czarist regime through revolution to Stalin's Terror and subsequent Soviet rule. Though born into a comfortable situation, she often lived in abject poverty and relied on the mercy of friends when governmental whim forced her poetry out of circulation. Feinstein, a poet, translator and biographer of Pushkin and Ted Hughes, has produced a thorough, workmanlike biography that runs more to giving times and dates than truly bringing this extraordinary woman to life. Feinstein gives enough (at times too many) details to hint at the complexity and contradictions that made up Akhmatova's character, but never delves deeply enough for a fully fleshed...


The Russian Debutante's Handbook
Gary Shteyngart
1573229881
May 2003
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Vladimir Girshkin, a likeable Russian immigrant, searches for love, a decent job, and a credible self-identity in Gary Shteyngart's debut novel, The Russian Debutante's Handbook. With a doctor-father of questionable ethics and a manic, banker mother, Vladimir avoids his suburban parents and their desire that he pursue the almighty dollar as proof of success. Vladimir gets by as an immigration clerk, eking out a living in a cruddy New York City apartment while accumulating an array of quirky acquaintances, from a wealthy but disheveled old man (who claims his electric fan speaks to him) desperate for citizenship to Challa, a portly S/M queen. As a love interest, Challa is replaced by Francesca, a graduate student whose friends welcome Vladimir for the status he brings their bohemian clique, and whose parents encourage them to...


My Half-Century : Selected Prose
Anna Akhmatova, Ronald Meyer (Translator)
0810114852
July 20, 1997
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Voice of her generation and prophet of Russia's misery, poet Anna Akhmatova (1889-1966) was touched by personal tragedies. Her first husband, poet Nikolai Gumilyov, was executed on the false charge of treason in 1921; their son Lev spent years in prison and exile. Herself vilified in the press, censored, isolated, plagued by tuberculosis, Akhmatova eked out a living as a translator until her belated recognition came in the 1960s. This kaleidoscopic selection of her prose includes autobiographical fragments, letters, essays on Pushkin, a rousing 1941 wartime broadcast to the women of Leningrad, diatribes against the Stalinist cultural establishment and encounters with Modigliani, Osip Mandelstam, Marina Tsvetaeva, Boris Pasternak and Alexander Blok. Akhmatova's quicksilver prose registers a resilient personality....


Minotaur
Tom Paulin
0674576373
Apr 1992
Hardcover
·
 
About the Author
Tom Paulin was born in Leeds in 1949 but grew up in Belfast, and was educated at the universities of Hull and Oxford. He has published seven collections of poetry as well as a Selected Poems 1972-1990, two major anthologies, two versions of Greek drama and several critical works, including The Day-Star of Liberty: William Hazlitt's Radical Style. Well-known for his appearances on the BBC's Late Review, he is also the G. M. Young Lecturer in English Literature at Hertford College, Oxford. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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