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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Mark Twain
1593080689
January 2004
Mass Market Paperback
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Rosa

0805071067


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Book Review

Book Review's Significant Seven
Nikki Giovanni graciously agreed to answer the questions we like to ask every author: the Book Review Significant Seven.
Q: What book has had the most significant impact on your life?
A: No single book. The poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar, Langston Hughes, and Gwendolyn Brooks was an impact, however.

Q: You are stranded on a desert island with only one book, one CD, and one DVD--what are they?
A: Sula by Toni Morrison, Great American Spirituals, and The Godfather.

Q: What is the worst lie you've ever told?
A: "You're the best."

Q: Describe the perfect writing environment.
A: A cup of coffee, my rocking chair, the sun just rising through my left window....


A Historical Guide to Ralph Ellison
Steven C. Tracy
0195152514
May 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Ralph Ellison has been a controversial figure, both lionized and vilified, since he seemed to burst onto the national literary scene in 1952 with the publication of Invisible Man. In this volume Steven C. Tracy has gathered a broad range of critics who look not only at Ellison's seminal novel
but also at the fiction and nonfiction work that both preceded and followed it, focusing on important historical and cultural influences that help contextualize Ellison's thematic concerns and artistic aesthetic. These essays, all previously unpublished, explore how Ellison's various
apprenticeships--in politics as a Black radical; in music as an admirer and practitioner of European, American, and African-American music; and in literature as heir to his realist, naturalist, and modernist forebears--affected his mature...


Uncle Tom's Cabin (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Harriet Beecher Stowe
1593080387
July 2003
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
Nearly every young author dreams of writing a book that will literally change the world. A few have succeeded, and Harriet Beecher Stowe is such a marvel. Although the American anti-slavery movement had existed at least as long as the nation itself, Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) galvanized public opinion as nothing had before. The book sold 10,000 copies in its first week and 300,000 in its first year. Its vivid dramatization of slavery’s cruelties so aroused readers that it is said Abraham Lincoln told Stowe her work had been a catalyst for the Civil War. Today the novel is often labeled condescending, but its characters—Tom, Topsy, Little Eva, Eliza, and the evil Simon Legree—still have the power to move our hearts. Though “Uncle Tom” has become a synonym for...


Great African Americans in Literature
Pat Rediger
0865058024
Dec 1996
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 3-6?Three well-written biographical profiles of seven notables in each of three fields, plus six shorter (three pages) biographies. The longer entries (six pages each) cover early years, skills developed, obstacles overcome, a personality profile, record of accomplishments, and special interests. Several quotes from each person are also prominently displayed in each featured biography. A number of well-known people are included in each title: Maya Angelou, Alex Haley, Alice Walker, Ralph Abernathy, Thurgood Marshall, John H. Johnson, Naomi Sims, Oprah Winfrey, Mildred Taylor, and Ernest Gaines to name a few. How or why the length of the entry was determined is not addressed, and many of these people seem to have equal importance in their fields. While the writing is informative, it is the candid photos...


New Essays on Song of Solomon (The American Novel)

0521456045


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Book Description
The essays collected here, written by leading critics of Toni Morrison's work, exemplify the fresh theoretical and cultural perspectives that have been brought to bear on African-American texts in general and on Song of Solomon in particular. They reveal the complexities of a deceptively straightforward novel and spark renewed interest in this pivotal text by one of the most gifted authors this nation has produced.


Richard Wright
Arnold Rampersad
0130361208
Nov 1994
Paperback
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The publisher, Prentice-Hall Humanities/Social Science
A generation ago Prentice Hall's Twentieth Century Views series set the standard for truly useful collections of literary criticism on widely studied authors. These collections of essays, selected and introduced by distinguished scholars, made the most informative and provocative critical work on each writer easily available to students, scholars, and the general public. Now the New Century Views series, co-edited by Richard Brodhead and Maynard Mack, offers volumes of the same excellence for the contemporary moment. Each volume captures and makes accessible the most stimulating critical writing of our time on crucial literary figures of the past and present. Also included in each is an introduction to the author's life and work, a chronology of important dates, and a selected...


Invisible Man
Ralph Ellison
0679732764
March 14, 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
We rely, in this world, on the visual aspects of humanity as a means of learning who we are. This, Ralph Ellison argues convincingly, is a dangerous habit. A classic from the moment it first appeared in 1952, Invisible Man chronicles the travels of its narrator, a young, nameless black man, as he moves through the hellish levels of American intolerance and cultural blindness. Searching for a context in which to know himself, he exists in a very peculiar state. "I am an invisible man," he says in his prologue. "When they approach me they see only my surroundings, themselves, or figments of their imagination--indeed, everything and anything except me." But this is hard-won self-knowledge, earned over the course of many years.

As the book gets started, the narrator is expelled from his Southern Negro college ...



The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Mark Twain
1593083513
August 2005
Hardcover
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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Frederick Douglass
1593080417
November 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
No book except perhaps Uncle Tom’s Cabin had as powerful an impact on the abolitionist movement as Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. But while Stowe wrote about imaginary characters, Douglass’s book is a record of his own remarkable life. Born a slave in 1818 on a plantation in Maryland, Douglass taught himself to read and write. In 1845, seven years after escaping to the North, he published Narrative, the first of three autobiographies. This book calmly but dramatically recounts the horrors and the accomplishments of his early years—the daily, casual brutality of the white masters; his painful efforts to educate himself; his decision to find freedom or die; and his harrowing but successful escape. An astonishing orator and a skillful writer, Douglass became a newspaper...


The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Women's Literature
Valerie Lee
0130485462
Aug 2005
Paperback
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From the Back Cover
Encompassing Pulitzer Prize winners Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gwendolyn Brooks, and Rita Dove, national icons Maya Angelou and Nikki Giovanni, and prominent cult figures Zora Neale Hurston and Octavia Butler, African American women's literature is one of the fastest growing areas of American literature today. The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Women's Literature is the first comprehensive collection of African American women's literature available today. It covers all historical periods, from the 18th century up through the early years of the 21st century; and all genres: from poems, essays, journal entries, and short stories to novels and black feminist criticism. Organized by three principles—chronology, genre, and theme—Lee's anthology includes questions for thought and discussion at...


The Color Purple
Alice Walker
0156028352
May 28, 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
Celie is a poor black woman whose letters tell the story of 20 years of her life, beginning at age 14 when she is being abused and raped by her father and attempting to protect her sister from the same fate, and continuing over the course of her marriage to "Mister," a brutal man who terrorizes her. Celie eventually learns that her abusive husband has been keeping her sister's letters from her and the rage she feels, combined with an example of love and independence provided by her close friend Shug, pushes her finally toward an awakening of her creative and loving self.


Uncle Tom's Cabin (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Harriet Beecher Stowe
1593081812
November 2004
Hardcover
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The Prentice Hall Anthology of African American Literature with Audio CD with CD (Audio)
Rochelle Smith
0130813672
Aug 1999
Paperback
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Book Description
B> Tracing African American literary and artistic contributions from the 1700s to the 1990s, this anthology presents a diverse collection that includes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, speeches, songs, paintings and photography. Readers learn about historical context, literary content, and rhetorical strategies while exploring sections on The Colonial Period (1746-1800), The Reconstruction Period (1865-1900), The Harlem Renaissance Period (1900-1940), The Protest Movement (1940-1959), The Black Aesthetics Movement (1960-1969), The Neo-Realism Movement (1970-Present), and Literary Criticism. For those interested in African American literature, art, and history.

Card catalog description
"Tracing African American literary and artistic contributions from the 1700's to the...


A Land Apart
J. M. Coetzee
0140100040
June 1987
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Afrikaans --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Harriet A. Jacobs
1593082835
April 2005
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Published in 1861, this was one of the first personal narratives by a slave and one of the few written by a woman. Jacobs (1813-97) was a slave in North Carolina and suffered terribly, along with her family, at the hands of a ruthless owner. She made several failed attempts to escape before successfully making her way North, though it took years of hiding and slow progress. Eventually, she was reunited with her children. For all biography and history collections.Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Erica Bauermeister
"Slavery is terrible for men, but it is far more terrible for women," Harriet Jacobs wrote in 1861. At that time she was an escaped slave living in...


Bud, Not Buddy (Newbery Medal Winner, 2000)
Christopher Paul Curtis
0440413281
January 8, 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
"It's funny how ideas are, in a lot of ways they're just like seeds. Both of them start real, real small and then... woop, zoop, sloop... before you can say Jack Robinson, they've gone and grown a lot bigger than you ever thought they could." So figures scrappy 10-year-old philosopher Bud--"not Buddy"--Caldwell, an orphan on the run from abusive foster homes and Hoovervilles in 1930s Michigan. And the idea that's planted itself in his head is that Herman E. Calloway, standup-bass player for the Dusky Devastators of the Depression, is his father.

Guided only by a flier for one of Calloway's shows--a small, blue poster that had mysteriously upset his mother shortly before she died--Bud sets off to track down his supposed dad, a man he's never laid eyes on. And, being 10, Bud-not-Buddy gets into all sorts of trouble along...



The Wadsworth Casebook Series for Reading, Research and Writing
Langston Hughes
0155054813
Apr 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
Part of The Wadsworth Casebooks for Reading, Research, and Writing Series, this new title provides all the materials a student needs to complete a literary research assignment in one convenient location.

About the Author
Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell are nationally well-known authors. With bestsellers in nearly every English market, they have the deepest publishing record of any handbook authors and they have successfully published texts for all parts of the curriculum?from Developmental English to Literature. Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell are nationally well-known authors. With bestsellers in nearly every English market, they have the deepest publishing record of any handbook authors and they have successfully published texts for all parts of the...


The Souls of Black Folk (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
W. E. B. Du Bois
1593081715
January 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) is the greatest of African American intellectuals--a sociologist, historian, novelist, and activist whose astounding career spanned the nation's history from Reconstruction to the civil rights movement. Born in Massachusetts and educated at Fisk, Harvard, and the University of Berlin, Du Bois penned his epochal masterpiece, The Souls of Black Folk, in 1903. It remains his most studied and popular work; its insights into Negro life at the turn of the 20th century still ring true.

With a dash of the Victorian and Enlightenment influences that peppered his impassioned yet formal prose, the book's largely autobiographical chapters take the reader through the momentous and moody maze of Afro-American life after the Emancipation Proclamation: from poverty, the neoslavery of the...



The Sound and the Fury (Vintage International)
William Faulkner
0679732241
January 30, 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
The ostensible subject of The Sound and the Fury is the dissolution of the Compsons, one of those august old Mississippi families that fell on hard times and wild eccentricity after the Civil War. But in fact what William Faulkner is really after in his legendary novel is the kaleidoscope of consciousness--the overwrought mind caught in the act of thought. His rich, dark, scandal-ridden story of squandered fortune, incest (in thought if not in deed), madness, congenital brain damage, theft, illegitimacy, and stoic endurance is told in the interior voices of three Compson brothers: first Benjy, the "idiot" man-child who blurs together three decades of inchoate sensations as he stalks the fringes of the family's former pasture; next Quentin, torturing himself brilliantly, obsessively over Caddy's lost virginity and his...


The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Literature : Five Volumes]
Hans Ostrom (Editor), J. David Macey (Editor)
0313329729
September 30, 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up–This comprehensive set covers the people, events, and themes relevant to the African-American experience and the literature that it inspired. More than 1000 signed entries of varying length are organized alphabetically and include biographical information as well as critical discussions of the works. Other articles describe major themes, historical events, places, cultural figures, and literary genres that continue to impact the African-American experience. Coverage ranges from the Colonial period through the present. Resources for further information appear at the end of each article and include both print resources and Internet sites. Alphabetical and thematic lists of entries (including important dates) appear in each volume and there is a comprehensive index in the final volume. Although...


The African Imagination
F. Abiola Irele
0195086198
Sept 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
This collection of essays from eminent scholar F. Abiola Irele provides a comprehensive formulation of what he calls an "African imagination" manifested in the oral traditions and modern literature of Africa and the Black Diaspora. The African Imagination includes Irele's probing critical
readings of the works of Chinua Achebe, Edward Kamau Brathwaite, Amadou Hampate Ba, and Ahmadou Kourouma, among others, as well as examinations of the growing presence of African writing in the global literary marketplace and the relationship between African intellectuals and the West. Taken as a
whole, this volume makes a superb introduction to African literature and to the work of one of its leading interpreters.


Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Frederick Douglass
1593083572
August 2005
Hardcover
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Honoring the Ancestors
Donald Henry Matthews
0195091043
July 1998
Hardcover
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Book Description
Donald Matthews affirms once and for all the African foundation of African-American religious practice. His analysis of the methods employed by historians, social scientists, and literary critics in the study of African-American religion and the Negro spiritual leads him to develop a
methodology that encompasses contemporary scholarship without compromising the integrity of African-American religion and culture.

Because the Negro spiritual is the earliest extant body of African-American folk religious narration, Matthews believes that it holds the key to understanding African-American religion. He explores the works of such seminal black scholars as W. E. B. DuBois, Melville Herskovits, and Zora Neale
Hurston, tracing the early development of the African-centered approach to the interpretation of...


The Souls of Black Folk (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
W. E. B. Du Bois
159308014X
May 2003
Paperback
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Book Review
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) is the greatest of African American intellectuals--a sociologist, historian, novelist, and activist whose astounding career spanned the nation's history from Reconstruction to the civil rights movement. Born in Massachusetts and educated at Fisk, Harvard, and the University of Berlin, Du Bois penned his epochal masterpiece, The Souls of Black Folk, in 1903. It remains his most studied and popular work; its insights into Negro life at the turn of the 20th century still ring true.

With a dash of the Victorian and Enlightenment influences that peppered his impassioned yet formal prose, the book's largely autobiographical chapters take the reader through the momentous and moody maze of Afro-American life after the Emancipation Proclamation: from poverty, the neoslavery of the...



The Girl Who Married a Lion : and Other Tales from Africa
Alexander Mccall Smith
0375423125
December 7, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Straying from the safety net of a bestselling series (The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency, etc.), Smith tells 40 traditional African folk tales with his by now signature humor, simplicity and reverence for African culture. With an introductory letter from No. 1 Lady Detective Mma Ramotswe as a preface, he sets the literary stage for a nostalgic stroll down his own personal memory lane. Born and raised in what is now Zimbabwe, Smith began collecting these stories as a child and combines them with several he gleaned from a friend who interviewed natives of Botswana. Many of the stories parallel classic Western tales, from Aesop to Mother Goose. The ubiquitous wolf-in-sheep's-clothing fable becomes a parable about a girl who unwittingly marries a lion. Other stories deal with familiar themes ranging from ingratitude...


Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God
Cheryl A. Wall
0195121732
Nov 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
The rediscovery of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, first published in 1937 but subsequently out-of-print for decades, marks one of the most dramatic chapters in African-American literature and Women's Studies. Its popularity owes much to the lyricism of the prose, the
pitch-perfect rendition of black vernacular English, and the memorable characters--most notably, Janie Crawford. Collecting the most widely cited and influential essays published on Hurston's classic novel over the last quarter century, this Casebook presents contesting viewpoints by Hazel Carby,
Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Barbara Johnson, Carla Kaplan, Daphne Lamothe, Mary Helen Washington, and Sherley Anne Williams. The volume also includes a statement Hurston submitted to a reference book on twentieth-century authors in 1942. As...


Ben Carson
Deborah S. Lewis, Mr. Gregg Lewis
0310702984
January 1, 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Take an up-close and personal look into the lives of some well-known Christians who are successful leaders in their careers. The Today’s Heroes series features everyday people who overcame great adversity to become modern-day heroes. Kids ages eight to twelve will be inspired by the compelling stories of courageous individuals who are making a real difference.
In Today’s Heroes: Ben Carson, learn the inspiring story of an inner-city kid who went from “class dummy” to a world-renowned pediatric neurosurgeon. Many had given up on Ben, including himself, but his mother never did. She encouraged him to do better and reach higher for his dreams. Just when things seemed like they were going well, in a fit of rage, Ben does the unthinkable and nearly kills one his best friends. Read how Ben...


Uncle Tom's Cabin (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
Harriet Beecher Stowe
1593081219
February 2005
Paperback
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Violence in the Lives of Black Women: Battered, Black, and Blue (Women & Therapy)
Carolyn M., Ph.D. West (Editor)
0789019949
March 2003
Hardcover
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Medische Anthropologie
"Wide-ranging. . . . A commendable collection of current research on violence against African-American women."

Beverly Greene, PhD, ABPP, Professor of Psychology, Diplomate in Clinical Psychology, St. John's University
Fills a critically important void. . . . A scholarly and comprehensive look at a serious problem that often goes undiscussed.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Known World
Edward P. Jones
0060557540
September 1, 2003
Hardcover
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Book Review
Set in Manchester County, Virginia, 20 years before the Civil War began, Edward P. Jones's debut novel, The Known World, is a masterpiece of overlapping plot lines, time shifts, and heartbreaking details of life under slavery. Caldonia Townsend is an educated black slaveowner, the widow of a well-loved young farmer named Henry, whose parents had bought their own freedom, and then freed their son, only to watch him buy himself a slave as soon as he had saved enough money. Although a fair and gentle master by the standards of the day, Henry Townsend had learned from former master about the proper distance to keep from one's property. After his death, his slaves wonder if Caldonia will free them. When she fails to do so, but instead breaches the code that keeps them separate from her, a little piece of Manchester County begins...

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