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Literatures of Latin America
Willis Barnstone
0130613606
July 2002
Paperback
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Book Description
Literatures of Latin America brings together literary, religious, and philosophical traditions from two continents and the Caribbean. Each of these regions has given us important writings, some of them dating back as far as the first millennium B.C. Until recently, historically speaking, we have been essentially ignorant of the major writers of Latin America, and in particular have known virtually nothing of precolumbian texts. Recent decades of assiduous translation, however, have made the larger world of Latin American literature accessible in English, connecting us to an enormous past and present of creative endeavor. Particularly in our multicultural society, with peoples of every background, it is vital to reveal the great traditions of Latin America, and to do so in fresh, excellent literary translation,...


The Last of the Mohicans (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593083351
November 2004
Hardcover
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Island of the Blue Dolphins
Scott O'Dell
0440439884
March 1, 1987
Paperback
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Book Review
Scott O'Dell won the Newbery Medal for Island of the Blue Dolphins in 1961, and in 1976 the Children's Literature Association named this riveting story one of the 10 best American children's books of the past 200 years. O'Dell was inspired by the real-life story of a 12-year-old American Indian girl, Karana. The author based his book on the life of this remarkable young woman who, during the evacuation of Ghalas-at (an island off the coast of California), jumped ship to stay with her young brother who had been abandoned on the island. He died shortly thereafter, and Karana fended for herself on the island for 18 years. O'Dell tells the miraculous story of how Karana forages on land and in the ocean, clothes herself (in a green-cormorant skirt and an otter cape on special occasions), and secures shelter....


I, Rigoberta Menchu: An Indian Woman in Guatemala
Rigoberta Menchu
0860917886
August 1987
Textbook Paperback
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From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Jesse Larsen
"This is my testimony. I didn't learn it from a book and I didn't learn it alone... My personal experience is the reality of a whole people." Born in the mountains of Guatemala into the Quiche, one of twenty-three mestizo groups, Rigoberta Menchu tells her story. The Quiche people's spirituality, much of which must not be told to outsiders, affirms community responsibility for village children and intensely personal relationships with the land and the natural world. The celebration of her ancient culture is all that strengthens in the face of a brutally repressed and poverty-stricken existence. Two of her brothers die as infants from malnutrition. When the Quiche begin their fight to keep the government and big-business people from stealing any more of their land, her family is...


Separate Reality
Carlos Castaneda
0671732498
August 1, 1991
Paperback
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Book Description
"A man of knowledge is free...he has no honor, no dignity, no family, no home, no country, but only life to be lived."--don JuanIn 1961 a young anthropologist subjected himself to an extraordinary apprenticeship to bring back a fascinating glimpse of a Yaqui Indian's world of "non-ordinary reality" and the difficult and dangerous road a man must travel to become "a man of knowledge." Yet on the bring of that world, challenging to all that we believe, he drew back.Then in 1968, Carlos Castaneda returned to Mexico, to don Juan and his hallucinogenic drugs, and to a world of experience no man from our Western civilization had ever entered before.


Removals
Lucy Maddox
0195069315
Jan 1991
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book resituates some familiar nineteenth-century texts within the context of public debates about the place of American Indians in the civil and cultural institutions of the new American nation. Rereading texts by Melville, Hawthorne, Child, Sedgwick, Thoreau, Fuller, and Parkman, Maddox
demonstrates the pervasiveness of the anxieties produced by discussion of "the Indian question" and shows how extensively they influenced the production and reception of writing in the first half of the century.


The Last of the Mohicans (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
James Fenimore Cooper
1593080654
November 2003
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description
The second and most popular chronicle in his Leather-stocking Tales, James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans is one of the great historical romances to come out of America. Set in 1757 amidst the French and Indian War, the novel tells the story of frontier scout Hawkeye and his efforts to conduct two daughters of a fort commander to safety.

Stephen Railton is Professor of English at the University of Virginia. Railton has published Fenimore Cooper: A Study of His Life and Imagination.


House Made of Dawn (Perennial Classics)
N. Scott Momaday
0060931949
July 1, 1999
Paperback
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-- New York Times Book Review
"Superb."

American Literature
"A new romanticism, with a reverence for the land, a transcendent optimism, and a sense of mythic wholeness...Push[es] the secular mode of modern fiction into the sacred mode, a faith and recognition in the power of the world."

See all Editorial Reviews


Dissenters and Mavericks
Margery Sabin
019515018X
June 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Dissenters and Mavericks reinvigorates the interdisciplinary study of literature, history, and politics through an approach to reading that allows the voices heard in writing a chance to talk back, to exert pressure on the presuppositions and preferences of a wide range of readers. Offering
fresh and provocative interpretations of both well-known and unfamiliar texts--from colonial writers such as Horace Walpole and Edmund Burke to twentieth-century Indian writers such as Nirad Chaudhuri, V.S. Naipaul, and Pankaj Mishra--the book proposes a controversial challenge to prevailing
academic methodology in the field of postcolonial studies. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


Legend of the Bluebonnet: An Old Tale of Texas
Tomie de Paola
0698113594
March 1996
Paperback
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Card catalog description
A retelling of the Comanche Indian legend of how a little girl's sacrifice brought the flower called bluebonnet to Texas. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


The Moonstone (Oxford World's Classics)
Wilkie Collins, John Sutherland
0192833383
February 17, 2000
Paperback
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From AudioFile
This seminal English mystery is presented in an unusual, but appropriate, manner, reflecting the episodic nature of the story. Three actors present the story in parts, taking on separate first-person accounts of events. All the voices are convincing, cultured British intonations describing the events surrounding the apparent theft of the Moonstone diamond from a country mansion. Each voice shades the various characters featured within the particular parts, just as the narrative offers characterizations of the other persons without attempting an outright mimicry. The abridgment is nicely done, too, avoiding any choppiness. D.W. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

Review
"The first and greatest of English detective...


Charming Cadavers
Liz Wilson
0226900533
Dec 1996
Hardcover
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Book Description
In this highly original study of sexuality, desire, the body, and women,
Liz Wilson investigates first-millennium Buddhist notions of
spirituality. She argues that despite the marginal role women played in
monastic life, they occupied a very conspicuous place in Buddhist
hagiographic literature. In narratives used for the edification of
Buddhist monks, women's bodies in decay (diseased, dying, and after
death) served as a central object for meditation, inspiring spiritual
growth through sexual abstention and repulsion in the immediate world.

Taking up a set of universal concerns connected with the representation
of women, Wilson displays the pervasiveness of androcentrism in Buddhist
literature and practice. She also makes persuasive use of recent
historical work on the...


Homeless Bird
Gloria Whelan
0064408191
September 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
"What if I don't like him?"
"Of course you will like him."
"But what if I don't?"
Maa impatiently slapped at a fly. "Then you must learn to like him."

But Koly never gets a chance to find out if she does care for her intended groom. Married and promptly widowed at 13, Koly finds herself in the grim position of being cast out by a society that has no place for girls like her. With a seemingly hopeless future in India, this courageous and spirited young woman sets out to forge her own destiny. Through perseverance, resourcefulness, and sheer luck, she manages not only to find a niche for herself, but even to find happiness again.

Gloria Whelan's tale of a remarkable girl in an extraordinary situation will linger with the reader long after the last page is read. The shaping of Koly's life,...



Notes on Blood Meridian
John Sepich
0963892703


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Charming Cadavers
Liz Wilson
0226900541
Dec 1996
Paperback
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Book Description
In this highly original study of sexuality, desire, the body, and women,
Liz Wilson investigates first-millennium Buddhist notions of
spirituality. She argues that despite the marginal role women played in
monastic life, they occupied a very conspicuous place in Buddhist
hagiographic literature. In narratives used for the edification of
Buddhist monks, women's bodies in decay (diseased, dying, and after
death) served as a central object for meditation, inspiring spiritual
growth through sexual abstention and repulsion in the immediate world.

Taking up a set of universal concerns connected with the representation
of women, Wilson displays the pervasiveness of androcentrism in Buddhist
literature and practice. She also makes persuasive use of recent
historical work on the...


A Suitable Boy : A Novel (Perennial Classics)
Vikram Seth
0060786523
October 1, 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Seth previously made a splash with his 1986 novel in verse, The Golden Gate . Here he abandons the compression of poetry to produce an enormous novel that will enthrall most readers; those who are fazed by a marathon read, however, may gasp for mercy. Set in the post-colonial India of the 1950s, this sprawling saga involves four families--the Mehras, the Kapoors, the Chatterjis and the Khans--whose domestic crises illuminate the historical and social events of the era. Like an old-fashioned soap opera (or a Bombay talkie), the multi-charactered plot pits mothers against daughters, fathers against sons, Hindus against Muslims and small farmers against greedy landowners facing government-ordered dispossession. The story revolves around independent-minded Lata Mehra: Will she defy the stern order of her widowed...


Ceremony
Leslie Marmon Silko
0140086838
March 1988
Paperback
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From AudioFile
A young Native American fights to defeat the demons that have followed him since his return from WWII. They intensify the estrangement he feels over his mixed parentage and his people's alienation. Adam Henderson tackles this novel with the slight singsong rhythm often adopted by traditional storytellers. He vividly personifies this young man, whose pain is almost overwhelming, but who strives to resist succumbing to the oblivion of alcohol, the refuge of many of his contemporaries. Henderson expresses the strength and hope of this young man, as well as his pain, and brings this compelling character to life. J.E.M. © AudioFile 2001, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine

From 500 Great Books by Women; review by Prudence Hockley
Tayo is a...


History of Indian Literature in English
Arvind Krishna Mehrotra
023112810X
Apr 2003
Hardcover
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Review
"Mehrotra has put together an amazing volume... A rigorous book, with a brilliant introduction, this compendium joins K. R. Srinivasa Iyengar's legendary Indian Writing in English. Essential." -- Choice
"[A] useful and detailed guide to a varied body of writing." -- Times Literary Supplement

Book Description
From Ram Mohan Ray to Arundhati Roy, two hundred years of Indian literature in English are covered in this volume, essential for anyone interested in this increasingly important literary tradition. Spanning a period from 1800 to the present, this collection of historical essays covers the canonical Indian poets, novelists, and dramatists writing in English -- names like Rudyard Kipling, Rabrindanath Tagore, R.K. Narayan, and Salman Rushdie -- as well as lesser-known literary...


Midnight's Children
Salman Rushdie
0140132708
January 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Anyone who has spent time in the developing world will know that one of Bombay's claims to fame is the enormous film industry that churns out hundreds of musical fantasies each year. The other, of course, is native son Salman Rushdie--less prolific, perhaps than Bollywood, but in his own way just as fantastical. Though Rushdie's novels lack the requisite six musical numbers that punctuate every Bombay talkie, they often share basic plot points with their cinematic counterparts. Take, for example, his 1980 Booker Prize-winning Midnight's Children: two children born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947--the moment at which India became an independent nation--are switched in the hospital. The infant scion of a wealthy Muslim family is sent to be raised in a Hindu tenement, while the legitimate heir to such squalor ends...


The Aztecs (See Through History)
Tim Wood
0670844926
September 1, 1992
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-7-- These books combine fine illustrations, both photographs and drawings, with a clearly written text to cover basic information about the social life and customs of two ancient civilizations. Maps at the beginning of each book provide students with a frame of reference while a list of important dates offers a context in which to place the culture. Rome describes only a brief moment in the history of the Roman Empire, the Augustan era at the height of the early Empire. Aztecs offers more of an overview of that relatively short-lived empire. Both books, however, provide a good, basic grounding in the cultures they describe. The texts are straightforward and descriptive, and relatively free of any judgmental tone. For example, Roman gladiators and the spectators' enjoyment of the competition is...


That's What She Said
Rayna Green
0253203384
Dec 1984
Paperback
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The Mouse Couple: A Hopi Folktale
Ekkehart Malotki, Michael Lacapa
0873584732


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Card catalog description
A mouse couple, in search of the mightiest husband for their daughter, approach the sun, the clouds, the wind, and a butte, before the unexpected victor finally appears.


Haroun and the Sea of Stories
Salman Rushdie
0140157379
November 1991
Paperback
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Book Review
Immediately forget any preconceptions you may have about Salman Rushdie and the controversy that has swirled around his million-dollar head. You should instead know that he is one of the best contemporary writers of fables and parables, from any culture. Haroun and the Sea of Stories is a delightful tale about a storyteller who loses his skill and a struggle against mysterious forces attempting to block the seas of inspiration from which all stories are derived. Here's a representative passage about the sources and power of inspiration: So Iff the water genie told Haroun about the Ocean of the Stream of Stories, and even though he was full of a sense of hopelessness and failure the magic of the Ocean began to have an effect on Haroun. He looked into the water and saw that it was made up of a thousand thousand...


American Indian Literature and the Southwest
Eric Gary Anderson
0292704887
Jan 1999
Paperback
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From Library Journal
Anderson, an English professor at the University of Oklahoma specializing in Native American literature, explores aspects of the literature of the Southwestern United States. Special attention is paid to encounters between the many cultures of the area: various Native American tribes, Euro-American groups, and, in Roswell, NM, even extraterrestrials. Anderson analyzes a wide range of "cultural texts," from George Herriman's Krazy Kat comic strip and Geronimo's autobiography to the novels of Leslie Marmon Silko, Willa Cather, and A.A. Carr. Anderson explores a range of conceptions of the Southwest in this thoughtful and complex work while incorporating myriad scholarly references into the text. Recommended for academic libraries.AGwen Gregory, New Mexico State Univ. Lib., Las CrucesCopyright 1999 Reed Business...


Handbook of Middle American Indians
Victoria Reifler Bricker
0292775938
Jan 1985
Hardcover
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Sacajawea (All Aboard Reading)
Joyce Milton, Shelly Hehenberger (Illustrator)
0448425394
October 15, 2001
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 1-3-A bare-bones introduction to the Shoshone guide. Milton focuses on her time spent helping Lewis and Clark, her marriage to Charbonneau, and the birth of her son, Pomp. Short sentences and pronunciation make the book accessible to emerging readers. Facts tend to be appropriately simple for the grade and reading levels. The large type is positioned on a white background and does not interfere with the full-color drawings. The illustrations lack pizzazz yet fit in well with the text. Several simple maps clue readers in to where the story is taking place. David Adler's A Picture Book of Sacagawea (Holiday, 2000) goes into more detail but the text is more difficult. Both titles would be useful, especially for Native American units.Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright...


Education of Little Tree
Forrest Carter
0826328091
March 2004
Paperback
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From AudioFile
Woodman's youthful sound doesn't work for THE EDUCATION OF LITTLE TREE, the first-person memoir of a little boy who lives in the Tennessee mountains. Woodman reads the story clearly and correctly, but he is too precise, too emphatic, too urban to sound comfortable saying that someone "total fooled a lot of possum-headed idjits." S.P. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to the Audio Cassette edition.

The Atlantic
“Some of it is sad, some of it is hilarious, some of it is unbelievable, and all of it is charming.” --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


The First Americans, Third Edition: Prehistory-1600 (A History of US, Book 1)
Joy Hakim
0195153200
September 15, 2002
Paperback
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David McCullough, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of John Adams
"A big breath of fresh air and the best possible news for the youngsters who get to read them." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Dr. Sonya Friedman, CNN
"An incredible look at who we were when this country began." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews


My Own Country: A Doctor's Story of a Town and Its People in the Age of AIDS
Abraham Verghese
0679752927
May 1995
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Indian physician Verghese recalls his experience practicing in the remote, conservative town of Johnson City, Tenn., when HIV first emerged there in 1985. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Book Description
Nestled in the Smoky Mountains of eastern Tennessee, the town of Johnson City saw its first AIDS patient in August 1985. Working in Johnson City was Abraham Verghese, a young Indian doctor specializing in infectious diseases who became, by necessity, the local AIDS expert. Out of his experience comes a startling, ultimately uplifting portrait of the American heartland.

See all Editorial Reviews


Coyote Was Going There
Jarold Ramsey
029595731X
June 2003
Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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