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Night
Elie Wiesel
0374500010
January 2006
Paperback
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Amazon.com
In Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel's memoir Night, a scholarly, pious teenager is wracked with guilt at having survived the horror of the Holocaust and the genocidal campaign that consumed his family. His memories of the nightmare world of the death camps present him with an intolerable question: how can the God he once so fervently believed in have allowed these monstrous events to occur? There are no easy answers in this harrowing book, which probes life's essential riddles with the lucid anguish only great literature achieves. It marks the crucial first step in Wiesel's lifelong project to bear witness for those who died.

The New York Times
"A slim volume of terrifying power"

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The Story Begins: Essays on Literature
Amos Oz
064165863X

Hardcover
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Book Description
In this collection of ten essays, Amos Oz shares his rich and rewarding experience as both writer and teacher. As he analyzes the opening sections of novels and short stories by such writers as Agnon, Gogol, Kafka, Chekhov, García Márquez, and Raymond Carver, Oz instructs, challenges, and guides. He writes about the notion of "beginnings," what the beginning of a novel or short story might "mean" to the author and how important it is. And best of all-he entertains. He highlights opening paragraphs in which authors make promises they may or may not deliver later in the work, or deliver in unexpected ways, or they may deliver more than they have promised. It is a game that miraculously and playfully engages both writer and reader. The Story Begins is a resourceful, accessible, and friendly companion for all...


Funny, It Doesn't Sound Jewish
Jack Gottlieb
0844411302
July 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In his introduction to this meticulously researched study of Jewish-influenced theatrical and popular music from 1914 to 1964, scholar and composer Gottlieb observes, "For the first time since ancient history, when synagogue cantillation influenced church plain chant, Jews contributed significantly to the music of the mainstream." To support his case, he analyzes melodies written for synagogues and the Yiddish theater and finds them in tunes that may not "sound Jewish." He discusses innumerable composers and artists, familiar and obscure, observant and nonobservant, converts and even non-Jews. One chapter is devoted to Cole Porter, "who wrote a little-known ballad, 'Hot-House Rose' (1926), which tells the bitter tale of a Jewish sweatshop (or hothouse) girl." The melodic passages cited on almost every page will...


The Anthology in Jewish Literature
David Stern
0195137515
July 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
The anthology is a ubiquitous presence in Jewish literature--arguably its oldest literary genre, going back to the Bible itself, and including nearly all the canonical texts of Judaism: the Mishnah, the Talmud, classical midrash, and the prayerbook. In the Middle Ages, the anthology became
the primary medium in Jewish culture for recording stories, poems, and interpretations of classical texts. In modernity, the genre is transformed into a decisive instrument for cultural retrieval and re-creation, especially in works of the Zionist project and in modern Yiddish and Hebrew
literature. No less importantly, the anthology has played an indispensable role in the creation of significant fields of research in Jewish studies, including Hebrew poetry, folklore, and popular culture. This volume is the first book to...


Jewish Literacy: The Most Important Things to Know About the Jewish Religion, Its People and Its History (Revised and Updated)
Joseph Telushkin
0688085067
March 1991
Hardcover
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Book Review
In 1988, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin undertook a mission to heal "Jewish ignorance," an affliction whose symptoms include the ability to name the three components of the Trinity, coupled with an inability to explain mitzvah. Telushkin's contribution to the cure is his wide-ranging, entertaining Jewish Literacy. First published in 1991, Jewish Literacy contains almost 350 entries on subjects ranging from the Ten Commandments to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. Entries are numbered (for easy, encyclopedia-style reference) and organized topically (to smooth the experience of reading each page straight through). And the revised edition contains several new entries (including articles about the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and the vice-presidential nomination of Joseph Lieberman) as well as numerous corrections,...


Four Perfect Pebbles: A Holocaust Story
Lila Perl, Marion Blumenthal Lazan
0380731886
November 30, 1999
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Amid a growing number of memoirs about the Holocaust, this book warrants attention both for the uncommon experiences it records and for the fullness of that record. Marion Blumenthal was not quite five years old in 1939 when her family fled Germany for Holland, ending up in the relative safety of Westerbork, then a refugee camp run by the Dutch government. They had visas for the U.S. and tickets for an ocean crossing, but during a fatal three-month postponement of their sailing, the Germans invaded Holland. By 1944 the Blumenthals arranged to be part of a group bound for Palestine in exchange for the release of German POWs; the family was instead sent to Bergen Belsen, where they remained, together, in the so-called Family Camp. Marion, her brother and parents survived the war, but her father died of typhus...


The 'Jewish Question' in German Literature 1749 - 1939
Ritchie Robertson
0198186312
Aug 1999
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book is an erudite literary study of the uneasy position of the Jews in Germany and Austria from the first pleas for Jewish emancipation during the Enlightenment to the eve of the Holocaust. Drawing on a wide range of literary texts, Ritchie Robertson offers a close examination of
attempts to construct a Jewish identity suitable for an increasingly secular world. No other study by a single author deals with German-Jewish relations so comprehensively and over such a long period of literary history.


The JGirl's Guide: The Young Jewish Woman's Handbook for Coming of Age
Penina Adelman
1580232159
November 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Kol k'vodah bat melekh p'nimah: The true majesty of a royal daughter is inside her. Psalm 45 provides a strong foundation for a wonderful book that, though written for the tween/teen set, has something to offer Jewish women of any age or denomination. The authors emphasize that "in modern terms, this means that to feel great about yourself—to feel majestic even—you need to listen to your inner self." Using a combination of Jewish resources, secular psychology and a wealth of input from Jewish girls and women, this guide covers the waterfront—from teenage issues of self-image, gossip, friendship and sex to more singularly Jewish issues such as the Sabbath, religious studies and the tradition of tikkun olam (repairing the world). Each chapter includes a lesson on a particular mitzvah; a variety of...


The Journey That Saved Curious George : The True Wartime Escape of Margret and H.A. Rey
Louise Borden
0618339248
September 26, 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-8–This beautifully designed volume is a must-have for children's literature buffs. The book is divided into two parts: the first gives background on the couple's childhoods and early life together; the second half is devoted to their dramatic escape from World War II-torn Europe. Husband and wife were both Jewish, born in Hamburg. After serving in the German army during World War I, Hans sailed to Brazil, where he wore a big hat and sailed down the Amazon. Margaret, an old family friend, joined him in 1935, and they soon married. Their honeymoon in Paris lasted four years. It was here that they began writing children's books about a curious little monkey named Fifi. By May of 1940 it was clear they must flee. So begins the second part. Tirelessly cycling by day, they boarded train after train...


The Jewish Child's First Book of Why
Alfred J. Kolatch, Harry Araten (Illustrator)
0824603540
January 1, 1992
Hardcover
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Judaica Book News
"Charming, colorful, and entertaining."

Book Description
In direct and simple language, Rabbi Kolatch explains the significance of some of the most fascinating traditions and customs of Judaism and introduces the child to the major and minor holidays in the Jewish calendar. The text is enhanced by the lively full-color illustrations of one of Israels leading contemporary artists. For ages four and up.

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Hurban
Alan Mintz
0231056346
July 1984
Hardcover
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Hitler Youth: Growing up in Hitler's Shadow
Susan Bartoletti
0439353793
February 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Starred Review. Grade 5-8–Hitler's plans for the future of Germany relied significantly on its young people, and this excellent history shows how he attempted to carry out his mission with the establishment of the Hitler Youth, or Hitlerjugend, in 1926. With a focus on the years between 1933 and the end of the war in 1945, Bartoletti explains the roles that millions of boys and girls unwittingly played in the horrors of the Third Reich. The book is structured around 12 young individuals and their experiences, which clearly demonstrate how they were victims of leaders who took advantage of their innocence and enthusiasm for evil means. Their stories evolve from patriotic devotion to Hitler and zeal to join, to doubt, confusion, and disillusion. (An epilogue adds a powerful what-became-of-them...


Reforming Fictions
Carol J. Batker
0231118503
Nov 2000
Hardcover
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Review
"An important reeveluation of Native, African, and Jewish American women's writing during the decades of the Progressive Era." -- Carol Farley Kessler, American Literature

Review
An important reeveluation of Native, African, and Jewish American women's writing during the decades of the Progressive Era.

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I Will Plant You a Lilac Tree : A Memoir of a Schindler's List Survivor
Laura Hillman
0689869800
April 26, 2005
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 9 Up–In a clear, objective narrative, Hillman (called by her German name, Hannelore, in the book) describes her life from April 1942, as a student at a private school in Berlin, until the German surrender in April 1945 that freed her from a detention camp. After her father's death, she left school and was deported with her mother and brothers to Poland. During her three years of captivity she was moved to several labor and concentration camps. Her inclusion on Oskar Schindler's list led, finally, to her deportation to the Brünnlitz camp in Czechoslovakia, where Jewish prisoners were treated humanely. At the fourth detention camp–Budzyn–Hannelore met the man who would become her husband. Her growing love and concern for him; her strong instinct for survival; and her endurance in...


The Jewish Study Bible: Tanakh Translation
Adele Berlin (Editor)
0195297512
January 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Serious students of Judaism will want to have a copy of this outstanding and surprisingly affordable study Bible, which stands in the tradition of Oxford's great study Bibles. Using the Jewish Publication Society translation, the books of the Jewish canon are presented in their traditional order: Torah (the five books of Moses); Nevi'im (the major and minor prophets); and Kethuvim (the other writings). Leading Jewish scholars introduce each book and offer extensive sidebar commentary, discussing the views of ancient and modern rabbinic scholars. In addition, the volume provides two dozen scholarly essays on different aspects of interpretation: the Bible's use in various periods in Jewish history, in the liturgy, in the Dead Sea Scrolls. There are essays on biblical languages, canonization, textual criticism,...


Ulysses
James Joyce
0679722769
June 1990
Paperback
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Book Review
Ulysses has been labeled dirty, blasphemous, and unreadable. In a famous 1933 court decision, Judge John M. Woolsey declared it an emetic book--although he found it sufficiently unobscene to allow its importation into the United States--and Virginia Woolf was moved to decry James Joyce's "cloacal obsession." None of these adjectives, however, do the slightest justice to the novel. To this day it remains the modernist masterpiece, in which the author takes both Celtic lyricism and vulgarity to splendid extremes. It is funny, sorrowful, and even (in a close-focus sort of way) suspenseful. And despite the exegetical industry that has sprung up in the last 75 years, Ulysses is also a compulsively readable book. Even the verbal vaudeville of the final chapters can be navigated with relative ease, as long as you're...


Reforming Fictions
Carol J. Batker
0231118511
Nov 2000
Paperback
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Review
"An important reeveluation of Native, African, and Jewish American women's writing during the decades of the Progressive Era." -- Carol Farley Kessler, American Literature

Review
An important reeveluation of Native, African, and Jewish American women's writing during the decades of the Progressive Era.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Upstairs Room (Trophy Newbery)
Johanna Reiss
006440370X
October 30, 1990
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
In this Newbery Honor book, Reiss writes a stirring, fictionalized account of her own experiences as a Jewish girl during World War II. Ages 12-up. Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 5-8-The deLeeuw family, Dutch Jews, did not emigrate to the U.S. in time to escape the German Holocaust. However, friends kept them hidden during those turbulent years and they did survive the War. As presented in Johanna Reiss' novel, based on her own experiences in Holland during World War II, (HarperCollins, 1972), Annie, the young first person narrator, and her older sister must live in an upstairs bedroom belonging to a rough but sympathetic farmer and his family. Christina Moore capably uses a youthful voice to portray Annie. While she does...


Breaking Crystal
Efraim Sicher
0252022807
Dec 1997
Hardcover
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Card catalog description
The first multidisciplinary study of its kind, Breaking Crystal examines how members of the generation after the Holocaust in Israel and the United States confront through their own imaginations a traumatic event they have not directly experienced. Among the questions this groundbreaking work raises are: Whose memory is it? What will the collective memory of the Holocaust be in the twenty-first century, after the last survivors have given testimony? How in the aftermath of the Holocaust do we read and write literature and history? How is the memory inscribed in film and art? Is the appropriation of the Holocaust to political agendas a desecration of the six million Jews? What will the children of survivors pass on to the next generation? --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


The Rebbe, the Messiah, and the Scandal of Orthodox Indifference
David Berger
1874774889
September 2001
Hardcover
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Survival In Auschwitz
Primo Levi
0684826801
September 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
Survival in Auschwitz is a mostly straightforward narrative, beginning with Primo Levi's deportation from Turin, Italy, to the concentration camp Auschwitz in Poland in 1943. Levi, then a 25-year-old chemist, spent 10 months in the camp. Even Levi's most graphic descriptions of the horrors he witnessed and endured there are marked by a restraint and wit that not only gives readers access to his experience, but confronts them with it in stark ethical and emotional terms: "[A]t dawn the barbed wire was full of children's washing hung out in the wind to dry. Nor did they forget the diapers, the toys, the cushions and the hundred other small things which mothers remember and which children always need. Would you not do the same? If you and your child were going to be killed tomorrow, would you not give him something to eat...


Six Million Paper Clips: The Making of a Children's Holocaust Memorial
Peter W. Schroeder
158013176X
November 2004
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
Grade 4-8 -With clear and concise language, color photographs, and an attractive layout, this book tells the inspiring and touching story of the teachers, students, and community of Whitwell Middle School in Tennessee, and their quest to understand and teach about the Holocaust. The authors, White House correspondents for a group of German newspapers, helped the school publicize the project to collect six million paper clips to show just how many people were murdered and obtained a German railcar to house them. The book includes a lot of quotes and behind-the-scenes information. Footnotes help to define unfamiliar terms. While the book mentions The Diary of Anne Frank, Livia Bitton-Jackson's I Have Lived a Thousand Years: Growing Up in the Holocaust (S & S, 1997), and Hana Volavkova's I Never Saw Another...


The Drowned and the Saved (Vintage International)
Primo Levi
067972186X
April 23, 1989
Paperback
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Book Review
This book, published months after Italian writer Primo Levi's suicide in 1987, is a small but powerful look at Auschwitz, the hell where Levi was imprisoned during World War II. The book was his third on the subject, following Survival in Auschwitz (1947) and The Reawakening (1963). Removed from the experience by time and age, Levi chose to serve more as an observer of the camp than the passionate young man of his previous work. He writes of "useless violence" inflicted by the guards on prisoners and then concludes the book with a discussion of the Germans who have written to him about their complicity in the event. In all, he tries to make sense of something that--as he knew--made no sense at all. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Jewish Gangsters of Modern Literature
Rachel Rubin Wolf
0252025393
Apr 2000
Hardcover
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We Are Witnesses : Five Diaries Of Teenagers Who Died In The Holocaust
Jacob Boas
059084475X


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From Publishers Weekly
Born in 1943 in the Westerbork concentration camp in Holland, Boas here brilliantly unfolds the history of the Holocaust through poignant excerpts from five teenagers' wartime diaries, enhanced with skillful commentary. Predictably, Anne Frank turns up, in the final section, but, as Boas points out, "alongside the other four diaries, Anne's looks different than when you read it by itself as the sole voice of the Holocaust." By the time readers encounter Anne Frank, they will have met Jewish teenagers trapped in equally tragic but even more violent circumstances in various parts of Europe, from a small Polish village to the Vilna ghetto to Brussels and Hungary. The young writers relay their hopes and fears even as they chronicle the disintegration of their daily lives. One is religious, another politically active,...


Number the Stars
Lois Lowry
0440227534
February 1998
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
The evacuation of Jews from Nazi-held Denmark is one of the great untold stories of World War II. On September 29, 1943, word got out in Denmark that Jews were to be detained and then sent to the death camps. Within hours the Danish resistance, population and police arranged a small flotilla to herd 7,000 Jews to Sweden. Lois Lowry fictionalizes a true-story account to bring this courageous tale to life. She brings the experience to life through the eyes of 10-year-old Annemarie Johannesen, whose family harbors her best friend, Ellen Rosen, on the eve of the round-up and helps smuggles Ellen's family out of the country. Number the Stars won the 1990 Newbery Medal. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
Set in Nazi-occupied Denmark in...


Israel in Exile
Ranen Omer-Sherman
0252030435
Mar 2006
Hardcover
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