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Immigrants, Unions, and the New U. S. Labor Market
Immanuel Ness
1592130410
June 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
In recent years, New Yorkers have been surprised to see workers they had taken for granted—Mexicans in greengroceries, West African supermarket deliverymen and South Asian limousine drivers—striking, picketing, and seeking support for better working conditions. Suddenly, businesses in New York and the nation had changed and were now dependent upon low-paid immigrants to fill the entry-level jobs that few native-born Americans would take. Immigrants, Unions, and the New U.S. Labor Market tells the story of these workers' struggle for living wages, humane working conditions, and the respect due to all people. It describes how they found the courage to organize labor actions at a time when most laborers have become quiescent and while most labor unions were ignoring them. Showing how unions can learn from the...


Rising from the Rails
Larry Tye
0805078509
June 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
What have the poet Claude McKay, the filmmaker Oscar Micheaux, the explorer Matthew Henson, the musician "Big Bill" Broonzy and college president Benjamin Mays in common? They all worked for the Pullman Company, which until 1969 owned the sleeper cars for and ran the sleeper service on the U.S. railroads, and was at one time "the largest employer of Negroes in America and probably the world." Blacks, preferably those with "jet-black skin," supplied "the social separation... vital for porters to safely interact with white passengers in such close quarters." Although Tye makes the general case for the centrality of "The Pullman Porter" in the making of the black middle class (and in much of American cultural life), the particular porter becomes supportive detail for a highly readable business history at one end and...


Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln
Doris Kearns Goodwin
0684824906
October 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
The life and times of Abraham Lincoln have been analyzed and dissected in countless books. Do we need another Lincoln biography? In Team of Rivals, esteemed historian Doris Kearns Goodwin proves that we do. Though she can't help but cover some familiar territory, her perspective is focused enough to offer fresh insights into Lincoln's leadership style and his deep understanding of human behavior and motivation. Goodwin makes the case for Lincoln's political genius by examining his relationships with three men he selected for his cabinet, all of whom were opponents for the Republican nomination in 1860: William H. Seward, Salmon P. Chase, and Edward Bates. These men, all accomplished, nationally known, and presidential, originally disdained Lincoln for his backwoods upbringing and lack of experience, and were shocked and humiliated at...


Growing Up Hard in Harlan County
G. C. Jones
0813190800
Feb 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Burly men with stern expressions, coal dust on their callused ready hands, and Christian values in their hearts settled the mountains of Appalachia over a century ago. G.C. "Red" Jones, a determined boy from Harlan County, Kentucky, found himself in the company of these "true mountain men" in the early 1900s. After being thrown out of his home without money or food, Jones set out to prove his independence and strength against the backdrop of the Coal Wars, Great Depression, and World War II. Although his encounters were often difficult and his adventures unsettling, Jones’ classic memoir, Growing Up Hard in Harlan County, depicts an unexpectedly rewarding way of life. Jones found joy in family life and comfort in the kindness of strangers as he fought to get work, struggled to care for his loved ones, and vowed...


Holding the Line: Women in the Great Arizona Mine Strike of 1983

0801483891


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From Publishers Weekly
Several mining towns have grown up around the rich Morenci copper pit in southern Arizona, each ruled to a certain extent by the Phelps Dodge Copper Corporation. In 1983, the company tried to freeze wages and deny the miners cost-of-living protection. The resulting strike lasted a long and miserable 18 months; management ultimately won its bid to have the union decertified but its business was damaged in the process, and the strikers took some comfort in a series of legal victories that, suggesting a discriminatory pattern of law enforcement, kept the labor activists out of jail. Journalist and novelist Kingsolver (The Bean Trees) has written a stirring partisan account of the role the area’s women played in holding the strike and in keeping families and communities together, despite the strike’s...


Mobsters, Unions, and Feds: The Mafia and the American Labor Movement
James B. Jacobs
0814742734
January 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
NYU law professor Jacobs further burnishes his reputation for advancing the study of organized crime in America with his latest work of scholarship, billed by the publisher as "the only book to investigate how the mob has distorted American labor history." This worthy successor to Gotham Unbound and Busting the Mob is an exhaustive, albeit sometimes repetitive, survey of the grip La Cosa Nostra has exerted on the country's most powerful unions. While many will be familiar with the broad outlines of the corruption that riddled the Teamsters, which is recounted by the author, his summary of some lesser-known examples of pervasive labor corruption help illustrate his thesis that the entire American union movement has suffered from the intimidation and fear the mob used to gain and maintain control of unions....


Skilled Hands, Strong Spirits
Grace Palladino
0801443202
Jan 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Skilled Hands, Strong Spirits follows the history of the Building and Construction Trades Department from the emergence of building trades councils in the age of the skyscraper; through treacherous fights over jurisdiction as new building materials and methods of work evolved; and through numerous Department campaigns to improve safety standards, work with contractors to promote unionized construction, and forge a sense of industrial unity among its fifteen (and at times nineteen) autonomous and highly diverse affiliates. Arranged chronologically, Skilled Hands, Strong Spirits is based on archival research in Department, AFL-CIO, and U.S. government records as well as numerous union journals, the local and national press, and interviews with former Department officers. Grace Palladino makes the history of the...


Wal-Mart: The Face of Twenty-First-Century Capitalism

1595580212


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From Publishers Weekly
Culled from an April 2004 conference on Wal-Mart at the University of California, Santa Barbara, these essays can be redundant, but they offer stimulating perspectives on the world's largest corporation. The rise of Wal-Mart, declares editor Lichtenstein (Walter Reuther), has been abetted by a "southernized, deunionized, post–New Deal America," a business culture in which labor costs can be squeezed, even as a company promotes loyalty via "faux classlessness." Several chapters place these phenomena in context: describing how Wal-Mart represents both an extension of and a quantum leap from previous retail giants and how it places unprecedented price pressure on its suppliers. Wal-Mart saves consumers money, the contributors argue, but only by externalizing many social and economic costs, including benefits...


Labor Relations
John A Fossum
0072987138
April 13, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Labor Relations: Development, Structure, Processes discusses the history and development of labor relations, the structure of union organizations, union organizing and union avoidance, bargaining issues, and the process of negotiations and contract administration. As a result of decreasing union membership over the last twenty years, more material in the book addresses employee relations in nonunion organizations including examples of both cooperative and adversarial relationships.

About the Author
John Fossum received his PhD from Michigan State University. He is an established author in the labor relations/personnel area. He is currently a full professor and the director of the Industrial Relations Center at the University of Minnesota.


The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, 1945-1968
Kevin Boyle
080148538X
July 1998
Paperback
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Book Description
A Choice Magazine "Outstanding Academic Book for 1996" "Kevin Boyle has done a masterful job of identifying the unique contribution of the UAW, not only to American Liberalism, but also to the nation and to all people. As contemporary labor and society at large search for new directions, this book should be required reading."--Victor G. Reuther "One of the many virtues of Kevin Boyle's brilliant and important history, The UAW and the Heyday of American Liberalism, is that it provides a clear picture of the road not taken."--The American Prospect "Intelligent, well written, and exhaustively researched, . . . Boyle's work . . . is part of an important and increasingly favorable reevaluation of the character of late New Deal social democracy."--Journal of American History "[Boyle's] book presents, with a remarkably...


Death in the Haymarket: A Story of Chicago, the First Labor Movement, and the Bombing That Divided Gilded Age America
James Green
0375422374
March 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
As Green thoroughly documents, the bloody Haymarket riot of May 4, 1886, changed the history of American labor and created a panic among Americans about (often foreign-born) "radicals and reformers" and union activists. The Haymarket demonstration, to protest police brutality during labor unrest in Chicago, remained peaceful until police moved in, whereupon a bomb was thrown by an individual never positively identified, killing seven policemen and wounding 60 others. Shortly after, labor leaders August Spies and Albert Parsons, along with six more alleged anarchists, stood convicted of murder on sparse evidence. Four of them went to the gallows in 1887; another committed suicide. The surviving three received pardons in 1893. The Knights of Labor, at that time America's largest and most energetic union, received...


Which Side Are You On
Thomas Geoghegan
1565848861
June 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Based on his experiences as a Chicago labor lawyer, Geoghegan contends persuasively that post-industrial Reaganomics have caused a widening rift between the working and professional middle classes. In related episodes, he demonstrates how the combined effects of steel mill closings, leveraged buyouts and Third World competitive labor have contributed to the decline of American organized labor. Even more tragic for the workers is their betrayal by international unions which, he asserts, are run by high-powered lawyers engaged in incessant arbitration; in cahoots with the Labor Department and, in some cases, with the mob--e.g., the Teamsters--labor lawyers are accused here of conspiracy to deprive the rank and file of the rights to organize, vote and air grievances freely. Moreover, Geoghegan declares, government...


A More Perfect Union
J. A. Jance
0380754134
November 1988
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Description

A shocking photo screamed from the front pages of the tabloids -- the last moments of a life captured for all the world to see. The look of sheer terror eternally frozen on the face of the doomed woman indicated that her fatal fall from an upper story of an unfinished Seattle skyscraper was no desperate suicide -- and that look will forever haunt Homicide Detective J.P. Beaumont. But his hunt for answers and justice is leading to more death, and to dark and terrible secrets scrupulously guarded by men of steel behind the locked doors of a powerful union that extracts its dues payments in blood.

About the Author
J.A. Jance is the American Mystery Award-winning author of the popular J.P. Beaumont mystery series as well as eight mysteries featuring Joanna Brady. Born in South...



One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
0451527097
August 1998
Mass Market Paperback
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Book Review
Solzhenitsyn's first book, this economical, relentless novel is one of the most forceful artistic indictments of political oppression in the Stalin-era Soviet Union. The simply told story of a typical, grueling day of the titular character's life in a labor camp in Siberia, is a modern classic of Russian literature and quickly cemented Solzhenitsyn's international reputation upon publication in 1962. It is painfully apparent that Solzhenitsyn himself spent time in the gulags--he was imprisoned for nearly a decade as punishment for making derogatory statements about Stalin in a letter to a friend. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review
"One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich yields, more than anything else, a beautiful sense of its author as a...


The Worm in the Apple
Peter Brimelow
0060096624
Feb 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
"The problem with America's government school system is socialism. The solution is capitalism-the introduction of a free market." This provocative theme, stated explicitly by CBS Marketwatch columnist Brimelow, aptly sums up the premise of this lengthy opinion piece on what's wrong with American schooling and how to fix it. The real villains in the government educational scam, according to Brimelow, are the unions, with their bloated bureaucracies, political maneuvering and teacher protection rackets. Brimelow's prescriptions go further than suggesting we simply get rid of unions. His remedies run along predictable ideological lines: turn education over to market forces, hand over responsibility for teacher education to private firms instead of universities and abolish the U.S. Department of Education....


Kids at Work: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor
Russell Freedman
0395797268
March 1998
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Hine photographed underprivileged child laborers from 1908-1918; their depleted faces look out from almost every page. "Freedman does an outstanding job of integrating historical photographs with meticulously researched and highly readable prose," said PW in a starred review. Ages 10-up. Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal
Grade 5 Up-Using the photographer's work throughout, Freedman provides a documentary account of child labor in America during the early 1900s and the role Lewis Hine played in the crusade against it. He offers a look at the man behind the camera, his involvement with the National Child Labor Committee, and the dangers he faced trying to document unjust labor conditions. Solemn-faced children, some as young as three...


Solidarity For Sale
Robert Fitch
189162072X
February 28, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
With this passionate but meandering call for reform, union member and journalist Fitch attempts to expose the systemic corruption—the "private use of public office"—that he deems central to the history of American labor and its current ineffectuality. After two scattered and polemical introductory chapters that put the corruption of American labor unions in a global context, the book traces a century's worth of labor history, from the 1881 founding of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters to the mob-backed looting of the Mason Tenders pension fund in the 1990s. Fitch likens labor unions to fiefdoms and union leaders to warlords while comparing their level of corruption to that of the pre-Reformation Catholic Church. He implicates historical figures from early 20th-century AFL president Samuel Gompers...


The Fight in the Fields
Susan Ferriss
0156005980
Apr 1998
Paperback
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From Library Journal
When the Chavez family lost its farm in Arizona in 1938 during the Depression, they moved to California and became migrant workers. Cesar was outraged by the exploitation, racism, and brutality that migrant farmworkers were forced to endure. His strong religious convictions, a dedication to nonviolent change, and a skill at organizing led to the establishment of the United Farmworkers (UFW) union. "La Causa," as it was called by supporters, became an important movement for self-determination in the lives of California's Mexican American and Filipino farmworkers. The successful nationwide grape and lettuce boycotts and public support exposed the injustices of California agribusiness and resulted in the first collective bargaining agreements and union hiring halls for migrant workers. Authored by two journalists who...


I Heard You Paint Houses: Frank "the Irishman" Sheeran and Closing the Case on Jimmy Hoffa
Charles Brandt
1586420895
May 2005
Paperback
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Kansas City Star
"The book already has impressed law enforcement officials enough to jump start the case. . . . It's a terrific read." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review
“Is Sheeran believable? Very . . . and ‘I Heard You Paint Houses’ is a very enjoyable book.”
Trial Magazine

“A page-turning account of one man’s descent into the mob.”
Delaware News Journal

“Sheeran’s confession that he killed Hoffa in the manner described in the book is supported by the forensic evidence, is entirely credible, and solves the Hoffa mystery.”
– Michael Baden, M.D., former Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York

“I’m fully convinced...


Gender and Power in the Workplace : Analysing the Impact of Economic Change
Harriet Bradley
0312218877
December 15, 1998
Hardcover
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Book Description
Using original material from interviews with female and male employees in five case-study organizations, this book explores how processes of gendering are played out in the sphere of employment. The author develops a new approach to power in terms of the range of resources which are used by women to challenge male domination and by men to resist women's encroachment. This approach is used to unpack the complexities of power relations of gender and class as they are played out in the everyday lives of working people.


Workers in Industrial America
David Brody
0195045041
Mar 1993
Paperback
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Book Description
This famous book, representing some of the finest thinking and writing about the history of American labor in the twentieth century, is now revised to incorporate two important recent essays, one surveying the historical study of the CIO from its founding to its fiftieth anniversary in 1985,
another placing in historical and comparative perspective the declining fortunes of the labor movement from 1980 to the present. As always, Brody confronts central questions, both substantive and historiographical, focusing primarily on the efforts of laboring people to assert some control over
their working lives, and on the equal determination of American business to conserve the prerogatives of management. Long a classic in the field of American labor history, valued by general readers and specialists alike for its...


The Death of a Thousand Cuts: Corporate Campaigns and the Attack on the Corporation
Jarol B. Manheim
0805838317
November 2000
Hardcover
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Book Description
A corporate campaign is an organized assault on the reputation of a company that has offended some interest group. Although corporate campaigns often involve political, economic, and legal tactics, they are centered around the media, where protagonists attempt to redefine the image--and undermine the reputation--of the target company. It is a strategy most frequently employed by unions but is also employed by special interests, such as environmental or human rights groups. Sometimes it is even employed by one corporation against another. It is a rapidly growing phenomenon that is still unknown to the general public, to most academics and journalists, and is rarely understood by the corporations that find themselves on the firing line.

The Death of a Thousand Cuts argues and demonstrates that corporate...


Race and Labor Matters in the New U.S. Economy
Manning Marable (Editor)
0742546918
June 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
In this powerful new work, Marable, Ness, and Wilson maintain that contrary to the popular hubris about equality churned out by the capitalist class, race is entrenched and more divisive than any time since the Civil Rights Movement. Race and Labor in the United States asserts that all advances in American race relations have only evolved through conflict and collective struggle. The foundation of the class divide in the United States remains, while racial and ethnic segregation, privilege, and domination, and the institution of neoliberalism have become a detriment to all workers.remains, while racial and ethnic segregation, privilege and domination, and the institution of neoliberal policies are a detriment to all workers.


In Labor's Cause
David Brody
0195067916
Nov 1993
Paperback
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Book Description
These extended essays by one of the preeminent scholars in U.S. labor history discuss central questions in the field, from the colonial period to the present: What do the first demands for a fixed workday tell us about how early American workers experienced the beginnings of the industrial
revolution? Why did American labor politics never manage to break the grip of the two-party system? What was the impact of ideology, career leadership, and ethnicity on the American labor movement? How did American trade unionism cope with the market-drive forces of American capitalism? Why did so
great a national crisis as World War II have so modest an impact on labor-capital-state relations in America? And finally, how did the struggle for industrial unionism produce the highly formalized "adversarial" system of workplace...


Labor Law: In a Nutshell (In a Nutshell)
Douglas L. Leslie
031423151X
March 2000
Paperback
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Book Description
The text provides a review of the early regulation - or lack thereof - of employer-employee relations, a more detailed frame of the modern National Labor Review Board, and a look at the primary legal issues, such as picketing, employer responses, and the duty to bargain. The text provides the scope and highlights you need to excel in understanding this field. This will enable you to answer exam questions more quickly and accurately, and enhance your skills as an attorney.


Working Women and Socialist Politics in France, 1880-1914
Patricia Penn Hilden
0198219350
Apr 1986
Hardcover
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Book Description
This enlightening study of the relations between the Marxist wing of the French socialist movement and a substantial female industrial proletariat reveals the failure of the Socialists to assimilate an important potential constituency. Hilden examines the early development of French socialism
and recreates the atmosphere of everyday life for textile workers in Lille, Roubaix, and Tourcoing around the turn of the century. She shows that these women demonstrated more political militance in the face of their worsening industrial situation and their exclusion from organized labor resistance
than has previously been suggested.


Gathering the Sun: An Alphabet In Spanish And English
Alma Flor Ada
0688170676
October 2001
Paperback
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From School Library Journal
PreSchool-Grade 5?An alphabet book with exceptional illustrations and excellent poetry that gives voice to the experience of Hispanic agricultural workers. Each letter is matched with a Spanish word (for example, "Arboles" for "A") and accompanied by a poem in both Spanish and English that describes how the plant, fruit, vegetable, person, or feeling functions in the lives of these workers. Zubizarreta's English translations are informed and graceful, but predictably cannot match the Spanish originals in rhythm, assonance, or meter. Silva's vibrant, double-page, gouache illustrations are reminiscent of the artwork of Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco. The colors are brilliant, and the scope has a certain larger-than-life sense to it. This is a book that begs to be read aloud to all students, whether they...


Gulag : A History
Anne Applebaum
1400034094
April 9, 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Nearly 30 million prisoners passed through the Soviet Union's labor camps in their more than 60 years of operation. This remarkable volume, the first fully documented history of the gulag, describes how, largely under Stalin's watch, a regulated, centralized system of prison labor-unprecedented in scope-gradually arose out of the chaos of the Russian Revolution. Fueled by waves of capricious arrests, this prison labor came to underpin the Soviet economy. Applebaum, a former Warsaw correspondent for the Economist and a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post, draws on newly accessible Soviet archives as well as scores of camp memoirs and interviews with survivors to trace the gulag's origins and expansion. By the gulag's peak years in the early 1950s, there were camps in every part...


Governments, Labour, and the Law in Mid-Victorian Britain : The Trade Union Legislation of the 1870s (Oxford Historical Monographs)
Mark Curthoys
0199268894
August 19, 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book explains why governments decided to make trade unions legal, and protect strikers from the criminal law. Drawing on previously unused source material, Curthoys brings to light some of the workings of the nineteenth-century state.

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