Book Finder
    
 
> Nonfiction > Social Sciences > Anthropology
 

Getting the Love You Want: A Guide for Couples
Harville Hendrix
0805068953
September 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
When Harville Hendrix writes about relationships, he discusses them not just as an educator and a therapist, but as a man who has himself been through a failed marriage. Hendrix felt the sting of his divorce intensely because he believed it signaled not only his failure as a husband but also his failure as a couples counselor. Investigating why his marriage dissolved led him to start looking into the psychology of love. Marriage, he ultimately discovered, is the "practice of becoming passionate friends."

As a result of his research, Hendrix created a therapy he calls Imago Relationship Therapy. In it, he combines what he's learned in a number of disciplines, including the behavioral sciences, depth psychology, cognitive therapy, and Gestalt therapy, to name just a few. He expounds upon this approach in Getting...



Black Like Me
John Howard Griffin
0451192036
Nov 1996
(Paperback) - Anniv. Ed.
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Griffin's (The Devil Rides Outside) mid-century classic on race brilliantly withstands both the test of time and translation to audio format. Concerned by the lack of communication between the races and wondering what "adjustments and discriminations" he would face as a Negro in the Deep South, the late author, a journalist and self-described "specialist in race issues," left behind his privileged life as a Southern white man to step into the body of a stranger. In 1959, Griffin headed to New Orleans, darkened his skin and immersed himself in black society, then traveled to several states until he could no longer stand the racism, segregation and degrading living conditions. Griffin imparts the hopelessness and despair he felt while executing his social experiment, and professional narrator Childs renders this...


Embedding Ethics : Shifting Boundaries of the Anthropological Profession (Wenner-Gren International Symposium Series)

1845200470


·
 
Book Description
Embedding Ethics questions why ethics have been divorced from scientific expertise. Invoking different disciplinary practices from biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology, contributors show how ethics should be resituated at the heart of, rather than exterior to, scientific activity. Positioning the researcher as a negotiator of significant truths rather than an adjudicator of a priori precepts enables contributors to relocate ethics in new sets of social and scientific relationships triggered by recent globalization processes--from new forms of intellectual and cultural ownership to accountability in governance, and the very ways in which people are studied. Case studies from ethnographic research, museum display, archaeological fieldwork and professional monitoring illustrate both...


Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies
Jared Diamond
0393317552
January 1999
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Explaining what William McNeill called The Rise of the West has become the central problem in the study of global history. In Guns, Germs, and Steel Jared Diamond presents the biologist's answer: geography, demography, and ecological happenstance. Diamond evenhandedly reviews human history on every continent since the Ice Age at a rate that emphasizes only the broadest movements of peoples and ideas. Yet his survey is binocular: one eye has the rather distant vision of the evolutionary biologist, while the other eye--and his heart--belongs to the people of New Guinea, where he has done field work for more than 30 years. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal
Most of this work deals with non-Europeans, but Diamond's thesis sheds light on why Western civilization...


Introduction to Physical Anthropology (Media Edition with Basic Genetics for Anthropology CD-ROM and InfoTrac)

0534644228


·
 
Book Description
This mainstream, full-color physical anthropology text is the best-selling text in the market! While it continues to present a comprehensive, well-balanced introduction to the field of physical anthropology, this is a major revision and the book has shifted emphases in critical areas of biology, including molecular biology and genetics, to reflect the field as it stands today. Now, as a Media Edition, INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY automatically comes with the new BASIC GENETICS CD which responds to growing interest in genetic variation driven by advances in molecular biology enhance.

About the Author
Robert Jurmain received an A.B. in Anthropology from UCLA, and a Ph.D. in Biological Anthropology from Harvard. He taught at San Jose State University from 1975-2004 and...


Life's Little Annoyances
Ian Urbina
0805080309
Nov 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Somewhere between passive aggressive and passionate aggression lies the perfect humorous response to an irritating event. Writer Ian Urbina—who started this project by writing an article for the New York Times and attracting legions of the slightly annoyed—has compiled a lovely collection of non-injurious (but highly mean) solutions that soothe the cranky soul.

The introduction gets off to a brilliant start: Urbina coated a pint of his frequently "borrowed" ice cream with a thick layer of salt, driving his ice cream thief of a housemate to furiously outing herself as the culprit. Additional tales offer websites that reject unappealing date prospects for you, examples of anti-honking haiku distributed on telephone poles all over Brooklyn and a flat-out heartening recounting of the original parking meter...



The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals
Michael Pollan
1594200823
April 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Pamela KaufmanPollan (The Botany of Desire) examines what he calls "our national eating disorder" (the Atkins craze, the precipitous rise in obesity) in this remarkably clearheaded book. It's a fascinating journey up and down the food chain, one that might change the way you read the label on a frozen dinner, dig into a steak or decide whether to buy organic eggs. You'll certainly never look at a Chicken McNugget the same way again.Pollan approaches his mission not as an activist but as a naturalist: "The way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world." All food, he points out, originates with plants, animals and fungi. "[E]ven the deathless Twinkie is constructed out of... well, precisely what I don't know offhand, but ultimately some sort of formerly living...


Why We Buy
Paco Underhill
0684849143
June 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In an effort to determine why people buy, Paco Underhill and his detailed-oriented band of retail researchers have camped out in stores over the course of 20 years, dedicating their lives to the "science of shopping." Armed with an array of video equipment, store maps, and customer-profile sheets, Underhill and his consulting firm, Envirosell, have observed over 900 aspects of interaction between shopper and store. They've discovered that men who take jeans into fitting rooms are more likely to buy than females (65 percent vs. 25 percent). They've learned how the "butt-brush factor" (bumped from behind, shoppers become irritated and move elsewhere) makes women avoid narrow aisles. They've quantified the importance of shopping baskets; contact between employees and shoppers; the "transition zone" (the area just inside the...


Anthropology (SparkCharts)
SparkNotes Editors
1411400690
February 2005
Paperback
·
 


Social and Cultural Anthropology: A Very Short Introduction
John Monaghan
0192853465
May 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
"If you want to know what anthropology is, look at what anthropologists do," write the authors of Social and Cultural Anthropology: A Very Short Introduction. This engaging overview of the field combines an accessible account of some of the discipline's guiding principles and methodology with
abundant examples and illustrations of anthropologists at work.
Peter Just and John Monaghan begin by discussing anthropology's most important contributions to modern thought: its investigation of culture as a distinctively human characteristic, its doctrine of cultural relativism, and its methodology of fieldwork and ethnography. Drawing on examples from
their own fieldwork in Indonesia and Mesoamerica, they examine specific ways in which social and cultural anthropology have advanced our understanding of human...


Guns, Germs, and Steel
Jared Diamond
0393061310
July 2005
(Hardcover) - Revised Ed.
·
 
Book Review
Explaining what William McNeill called The Rise of the West has become the central problem in the study of global history. In Guns, Germs, and Steel Jared Diamond presents the biologist's answer: geography, demography, and ecological happenstance. Diamond evenhandedly reviews human history on every continent since the Ice Age at a rate that emphasizes only the broadest movements of peoples and ideas. Yet his survey is binocular: one eye has the rather distant vision of the evolutionary biologist, while the other eye--and his heart--belongs to the people of New Guinea, where he has done field work for more than 30 years. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal
Most of this work deals with non-Europeans, but Diamond's thesis sheds...


The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down
Anne Fadiman
0374525641
September 28, 1998
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Lia Lee was born in 1981 to a family of recent Hmong immigrants, and soon developed symptoms of epilepsy. By 1988 she was living at home but was brain dead after a tragic cycle of misunderstanding, overmedication, and culture clash: "What the doctors viewed as clinical efficiency the Hmong viewed as frosty arrogance." The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down is a tragedy of Shakespearean dimensions, written with the deepest of human feeling. Sherwin Nuland said of the account, "There are no villains in Fadiman's tale, just as there are no heroes. People are presented as she saw them, in their humility and their frailty--and their nobility." --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From School Library Journal
YA?A compelling anthropological...


Break No Bones: A Temperance Brennan Novel
Kathy Reichs
0743233492
July 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
The success of the Fox TV show Bones, based on bestseller Reichs's series featuring forensic anthropologist Temperance Brennan (Cross Bones, etc.), bodes well for this latest installment, in which Brennan once again stumbles on a modern-day mystery inadvertently. While supervising a dig of Native American burial grounds in Charleston, S.C., Brennan finds more recent remains. Soon, her ex-husband, who's a lawyer, appears in town, pursuing leads in a missing persons case connected with a local church. Bodies start piling up at an alarming rate, and Brennan begins to suspect that the deaths are linked to each other—and her ex-husband's inquiry. Reichs's down-to-earth heroine is an appealing creation, who deftly juggles personal problems with professional challenges. Despite the somewhat obvious solution, this...


Bowling Alone
Robert D. Putnam
0743203046
Jan 2001
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Few people outside certain scholarly circles had heard the name Robert D. Putnam before 1995. But then this self-described "obscure academic" hit a nerve with a journal article called "Bowling Alone." Suddenly he found himself invited to Camp David, his picture in People magazine, and his thesis at the center of a raging debate. In a nutshell, he argued that civil society was breaking down as Americans became more disconnected from their families, neighbors, communities, and the republic itself. The organizations that gave life to democracy were fraying. Bowling became his driving metaphor. Years ago, he wrote, thousands of people belonged to bowling leagues. Today, however, they're more likely to bowl alone: Television, two-career families, suburban sprawl, generational changes in values--these and other changes in...


Strangers to These Shores : Race and Ethnic Relations in the United States (8th Edition)
Vincent N. Parrillo
0205457630
July 29, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
We are invited to read in Strangers to These Shores the story of a resilient society that is struggling to achieve unity out of diversity and, at the same time, guarantee the right to be different. . . . Robert Park, who taught sociology at the University of Chicago and Fisk University several decades ago, described people who understand the way of life of many different kinds of groups as having a wider horizon, keener intelligence, and a more rational point of view. If this is the kind of insight we would like to have, we should stay the course with this book as if it were our magic carpet that will carry us immediately into the unknown culture of many minority groups in this nation. Charles V. Willie, Harvard University (from the Foreword)

From the Back Cover
...


Laughter Out of Place (California Series in Public Anthropology): Race, Class, Violence, and Sexuality in a Rio Shantytown
Donna M. Goldstein
0520235975
November 2003
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Donna M. Goldstein challenges much of what we think we know about the "culture of poverty." Drawing on more than a decade of experience in Brazil, Goldstein provides an intimate portrait of everyday life among the women of the favelas, or urban shantytowns. These women have created absurdist and black-humor storytelling practices in the face of trauma and tragedy. Goldstein helps us to understand that such joking and laughter is part of an emotional aesthetic that defines the sense of frustration and anomie endemic to the political and economic desperation of the shantytown.

From the Inside Flap
"Goldstein returns anthropology to what it does best while taking the reader on a no-holds-barred ride through the tragicomic world of a Rio favela. She captures the bittersweet...


Hungry Planet
Faith D'Aluisio
1580086810
Oct 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
It's an inspired idea--to better understand the human diet, explore what culturally diverse families eat for a week. That's what photographer Peter Menzel and author-journalist Faith D'Alusio, authors of the equally ambitious Material World, do in Hungry Planet: What the World Eats, a comparative photo-chronicle of their visits to 30 families in 24 countries for 600 meals in all. Their personal-is-political portraits feature pictures of each family with a week's worth of food purchases; weekly food-intake lists with costs noted; typical family recipes; and illuminating essays, such as "Diabesity," on the growing threat of obesity and diabetes. Among the families, we meet the Mellanders, a German household of five who enjoy cinnamon rolls, chocolate croissants, and beef roulades, and whose weekly food...


Before the Dawn: Recovering The Lost History of Our Ancestors
Nicholas Wade
1594200793
April 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Scientists are using DNA analysis to understand our prehistory: the evolution of humans; their relation to the Neanderthals, who populated Europe and the Near East; and Homo erectus, who roamed the steppes of Asia. Most importantly, geneticists can trace the movements of a little band of human ancestors, numbering perhaps no more than 150, who crossed the Red Sea from east Africa about 50,000 years ago. Within a few thousand years, their descendents, Homo sapiens, became masters of all they surveyed, the other humanoid species having become extinct. According to New York Times science reporter Wade, this DNA analysis shows that evolution isn't restricted to the distant past: Iceland has been settled for only 1,000 years, but the inhabitants have already developed distinctive genetic traits. Wade expands his...


The Paradox of Choice : Why More Is Less
Barry Schwartz
0060005696
January 1, 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Like Thoreau and the band Devo, psychology professor Schwartz provides ample evidence that we are faced with far too many choices on a daily basis, providing an illusion of a multitude of options when few honestly different ones actually exist. The conclusions Schwartz draws will be familiar to anyone who has flipped through 900 eerily similar channels of cable television only to find that nothing good is on. Whether choosing a health-care plan, choosing a college class or even buying a pair of jeans, Schwartz, drawing extensively on his own work in the social sciences, shows that a bewildering array of choices floods our exhausted brains, ultimately restricting instead of freeing us. We normally assume in America that more options ("easy fit" or "relaxed fit"?) will make us happier, but Schwartz shows the...


Dead Men Do Tell Tales
William R. Maples
0385479689
Jan 1994
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Noted forensic anthropologist Maples, whose specialty is the study of bones, and freelance journalist Browning here recount Maples's criminal and anthropological investigations over the past 20 years. The meandering text combines episodes from Maples's personal life and education with discourses on his philosophy, his teaching at the Univ. of Florida and his work. The book's strength is as a snapshot of the world of forensic scientists, vividly portraying the siege mentality of many of them when their objective data are used for purposes other than ascertaining the truth about how a victim died. Despite the two-dimensional depiction of the people who were the objects of Maples's investigations-including the "likely" remains of Romanov Tsar Nicholas II-his memoirs should hold readers' interest. Copyright 1994 Reed...


The Wide, Wide Circle of Divine Love
W. Eugene March
0664227082
Jan 2005
(Paperback) - Revised Ed.
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Making a biblical case for religious diversity is a tall order. But this small, information-packed book, by a retired professor of Old Testament studies at Louisville Presbyterian Seminary, delivers. March begins with his own experience, admitting that as he interacted with people of other faiths, some of his "official theology," which denied the validity of other people's faith, "simply did not compute." From there, he takes readers through stories from the Old and New Testaments demonstrating how God's love always creates a wider circle than humans expect. With a conviction that "we belong to God—all of us," March explains why a literal reading of the Bible, ignoring historical context, is misleading and causes some Christians to spend their lives focusing on who is and is not accepted by God. If a...


Conformity and Conflict: Readings in Cultural Anthropology
David W. McCurdy (Editor)
0205449700
May 2005
Textbook Paperback
·
 
Book Description
An ideal complement to standard anthropology texts or a stand-alone text/reader, Conformity and Conflict continues to offer an in-depth look at anthropology as a powerful way to study human behavior and events. The articles included in this reader cover a broad range of theoretical perspectives and demonstrate basic anthropological concepts. Focus on the current concerns in both anthropology and American society shapes the Twelfth Edition, including globalization, the study of women's lives, race and ethnicity, and the practical applications of anthropology and the ways it leads to everyday careers. Highlights of the Twelfth Edition: The revised contents reflect the suggestions of Conformity and Conflict users. Thirty percent of the readings are either revised or entirely new to this edition. Nine new articles...


Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria : And Other Conversations about Race
Beverly Daniel Tatum
0465083617
December 2002
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
Anyone who's been to a high school or college has noted how students of the same race seem to stick together. Beverly Daniel Tatum has noticed it too, and she doesn't think it's so bad. As she explains in this provocative, though not-altogether-convincing book, these students are in the process of establishing and affirming their racial identity. As Tatum sees it, blacks must secure a racial identity free of negative stereotypes. The challenge to whites, on which she expounds, is to give up the privilege that their skin color affords and to work actively to combat injustice in society. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews
This insightful exploration of the varieties of Americans' experience with race and racism in everyday...


Pilgrims
Mary Pope Osborne
037583219X
Sept 2005
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
What was it like to be a passenger on the Mayflower? How many people survived the first harsh winter in the New World? How did Pilgrim children spend their days? Find out the answers to these questions and more in this Magic Tree House Research Guide: Pilgrims. Includes fun facts from Jack and Annie, fantastic photos and illustrations, and a guide to doing further research.

About the Author
Mary Pope Osborne and Natalie Pope Boyce are sisters who grew up on army posts all over the world. Mary is the author of over 50 acclaimed books for children. Natalie has worked as a children’s librarian and as a teacher of English and E.S.L. This is their fourth book together. The authors live in Goshen, CT, and West Stockbridge, MA, respectively.

Sal Murdocca has...


Cultural Anthropology : The Human Challenge (with CD-ROM and InfoTrac)
William A. Haviland, et al
0534624871
July 21, 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Comprehensive, readable and written for the student, Haviland/Prins/Walwrath/McBride's market-leading text, CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, is a highly relevant, high-quality teaching tool. The narrative voice of the text has been thoroughly internationalized and the "we:they" Western voice has been replaced with an inclusive one that will resonate with both Western and non-Western students and professors. In addition, gender, ethnicity, and stratification concepts and terminologies have been completely overhauled in accordance with contemporary thinking and the narrative streamlined using more fully developed, balanced, and global examples. In CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, the authors present students with examples of "local responses" to challenging globalization issues, designed to provide students with a "cross-cultural survival...


Bridges Out of Poverty: Strategies for Professionals and Communities
Ruby K.. Payne, et al
0964743795
October 10, 2000
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Bridges Out of Poverty takes the concepts of hidden rules of economic class and uses them to educate social workers, employers and community organizations about hte unique and sometimes hidden obstacles that individuals from poverty face. Strategies help improve services for clients, raise retention rates for new hires from poverty, and increase understanding of the differences in economic cultures and how those differences affect opportunities for success.

About the Author
Author biography: Dr. Ruby Payne, speaker, author and CEO of aha! Process, a training/publishing company, speaks to tens of thousands of professionals each year about poverty and economic diversity. Payne is best known for her work on "hidden rules of economic class" and their affect on learning and...


Open Space Technology: A User's Guide
Harrison Owen
1576750248
September 1997
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Open Space Technology: A User's Guide is just what the name implies: a hands-on, detailed description of facilitating Open Space Technology (OST). Written by the originator of the method-an effective, economical, fast, and easily-repeatable strategy for organizing meetings of between 5 and 1,000 participants-this is the first book to document the rationale, procedures, and requirements of OST. OST enables self-organizing groups of all sizes to deal with hugely complex issues in a very short period of time. This practical, step-by-step user's guide details what needs to be done before, during, and after an Open Space event. 1

Owen begins by detailing all the practical considerations necessary to create Open Space. He begins with the most important question-should you do Open Space at all-and examines...


  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.