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Digging Holes in Popular Culture

1842170635


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Book Description
What would Howard Carter have thought of Lara Croft? and why do archaeologists feature so prominently in Star Trek? Douglas Adams, author of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy writes the preface to this unusual collection of papers dedicated to exploring the role of the archaeologist in popular culture. The clichés and stereotypes of archaeology that abound in popular culture, the sense of mystery and adventure, the excitement generated by a dangerous treasure hunt or a thrilling detective story, rarely hint at the monotonous hours spent by modern archaeologists researching in laboratories and libraries and filling out paperwork. Yet the role-models provided by fictional characters such as Dr Who, Indiana Jones, Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Lara Croft have had a powerful influence on how archaeologists and the...


From Pieces to Weight
50 Cent
0743486447
Aug 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. The rap superstar known as 50 Cent was born Curtis James Jackson III in 1976. His mother, a smalltime drug dealer, was murdered when he was eight, but that didn't stop him from pursuing her profession. 50 Cent is unflinchingly honest about his mother, his drug past and just about everything else in this raw, literate memoir chronicling his rise from Jamaica, Queens, to the top of the Billboard charts. In his neighborhood, recalls 50 Cent, the only people with money were the drug dealers: "They were my role models." By 11, he'd made his first sale. Over the next decade, 50 Cent evolved from a hustler selling capsules of crack cocaine ("pieces") to a kingpin purchasing by the kilo ("weight"). With money came girls, clothes, cars—and trouble. 50 Cent describes spraying bullets at rivals,...


The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer (Popular Culture and Philosophy Series), Vol. 2
William Irwin (Editor)
0812694333
April 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
No doubt Aristotle just rolled over in his grave. An essay called "Homer and Aristotle" would appear to be a treatise on two ancient Greek thinkers; in this case, it's a depiction of Homer Simpson's Aristotelian virtues. Raja Halwani's "Homeric" essay is amusing, though, and moreover, it actually ends up being enlightening, especially for those just learning Aristotle's ethics. Bart may be a Nietzschean without knowing it; Mr. Burns is a cipher for unhappiness (except when he eats "so-called iced-cream"); and Ned Flanders raises questions about neighborly love. The Simpsons and Philosophy has a lot to say about The Simpsons, and even more to say about philosophy.

The book collects 18 essays into an unpretentious, tongue-in-cheek, and surprisingly intelligent look at philosophy through the lens of Matt Groening's vaunted...



Burlesque and the Art of the Teese/Fetish and the Art of the Teese

0060591676


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Los Angeles Times
"Dita Von Teese [is] the queen of the new burlesque renaissance."

Bizarre Magazine
"Dita Von Teese doesn’t just look like the ultimate vamp. She actually is."

See all Editorial Reviews


Are Men Necessary
Maureen Dowd
0399153322
Nov 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Dowd's Bushworld, collecting her amped New York Times op-eds, hit big during the 2004 presidential campaign. This follow-up is as slapdash as the earlier book was slash-and-burn. What Dowd seems really to want to do is dish up anecdotes of gender bias in the media, which she does with her usual aplomb—everything from how Elizabeth Vargas was booted out of Peter Jennings's vacant chair at ABC during his illness ("I'm not sure if she has the gravitas," opines an exec) to the guys who won't date Dowd because she's got more Beltway juice (and money) than they. The rest is padding: endless secondary source and pundit quotes ("In Time, Andrew Sullivan wondered: 'So a woman is less a woman if she is a scientist or journalist or Prime Minister?' "); examples of gender relations gone wrong in books, film and TV; random interview...


Suntanning in 20th Century America

0786423943


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Book Description
The suntan experienced a profound change in the last century. Considered a mark of the lower class for hundreds of years, tanning became a fad in the early 1920s and remains popular today. The tan, though, was much more thana matter of fashion,enjoying at first a boost from the medical establishment. Opinions ranging from hard science to quackery lauded the suntan as something of a panacea. Near the end of World War II, however, researchers increasingly warned against the hazards of overexposure to the sun, and a large new industry developed—sunscreen. Americans’ current paradoxical obsession with the tan developed almost entirely from the conflicting rays of twentieth century thought. This history examines the twentieth century suntan as a social and scientific phenomenon. Beginning with the years...


The Complete New Yorker with DVD
New Yorker Magazine
1400064740
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
EVERY PAGE OF EVERY ISSUE
ON 8 DVD-ROMS, WITH A COMPANION BOOK OF HIGHLIGHTS.

A cultural monument, a journalistic gold mine, an essential research tool, an amazing time machine.


What has the New Yorker said about Prohibition, Duke Ellington, the Second World War, Bette Davis, boxing, Winston Churchill, Citizen Kane, the invention of television, the Cold War, baseball, the lunar landing, Willem de Kooning, Madonna, the internet, and 9/11?

Eighty years of The New Yorker offers a detailed, entertaining history of the life of the city, the nation, and the world since 1925.

Every article, every cartoon, every illustration, every advertisement, exactly as it appeared on the printed page, in full color. Flip through full spreads of the magazine to browse...


Harry Potter and Philosophy ( Popular Culture and Philosophy Series): If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts
David Baggett (Editor)
0812694554
October 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Harry Potter has put a spell on millions of readers, and they all want to find out more about the deeper meaning of his adventures. In Harry Potter and Philosophy, 17 experts in the field of philosophy unlock some of Hogwarts' secret panels, uncovering surprising insights that are enlightening both for wizards and for the most discerning muggles. Individual chapters look at such topics as life revealed in the Mirror of Erised; the ethics of magic; Moaning Myrtle, Nearly Headless Nick, and the relation of the mind to the brain; and the character of Hermione as a case of "sublimated feminism." Also examined in this witty collection are how Aristotle would have run a school for wizards; whether the Potter stories undermine religion and morality; how to tell good people from evil ones through the characters in these...


Star Wars and Philosophy (Popular Culture and Philosophy Series)
Kevin S. Decker (Editor)
0812695836
April 2005
Paperback
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The Bookwatch, September 2005
...holds implications for all with its solid link between popular culture, philosophy, and social insights.

Book News, Inc., May 2005
Just the thing to read while queuing for tickets, or perhaps as a source of readings for your theme wedding.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Omnivore's Dilemma : A Natural History of Four Meals
Michael Pollan
1594200823
April 11, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Pamela KaufmanPollan (The Botany of Desire) examines what he calls "our national eating disorder" (the Atkins craze, the precipitous rise in obesity) in this remarkably clearheaded book. It's a fascinating journey up and down the food chain, one that might change the way you read the label on a frozen dinner, dig into a steak or decide whether to buy organic eggs. You'll certainly never look at a Chicken McNugget the same way again.Pollan approaches his mission not as an activist but as a naturalist: "The way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world." All food, he points out, originates with plants, animals and fungi. "[E]ven the deathless Twinkie is constructed out of... well, precisely what I don't know offhand, but ultimately some sort of formerly living...


Postsecret
Frank Warren
0060899190
Dec 2005
Hardcover
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– A contributor on Postsecret.com
"Humanity at its finest . . . And because of it I am falling in love with the world again."

– TIME.com, "50 Coolest Websites of 2005"
"A fascinating public airing of private thoughts. . . The range of efforts (meticulous, sloppy, artful, ponderous) will astound you."

See all Editorial Reviews


Misreading Masculinity: Boys, Literacy, and Popular Culture
Thomas Newkirk
0325004455
August 2002
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
In this important book Tom Newkirk takes an up-close look at elementary boys and their relationship to sports, movies, video games, and other venues of popular culture.

About the Author
THOMAS NEWKIRK is a professor of English at the University of New Hampshire and the former director of that school's freshman English program. He has studied literacy learning at a variety of educational levelsfrom preschool to college. Newkirk is the coeditor of Taking Stock: The Writing Process Movement in the 90s (Boynton/Cook, 1994), and the editor of Nuts & Bolts: A Practical Guide to Teaching College Composition (Boynton/Cook, 1993).


Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Hunter S. Thompson
0679785892
May 1998
Paperback
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Book Review Reviews
Heralded as the "best book on the dope decade" by the New York Times Book Review, Hunter S. Thompson's documented drug orgy through Las Vegas would no doubt leave Nancy Reagan blushing and D.A.R.E. founders rethinking their motto. Under the pseudonym of Raoul Duke, Thompson travels with his Samoan attorney, Dr. Gonzo, in a souped-up convertible dubbed the "Great Red Shark." In its trunk, they stow "two bags of grass, seventy-five pellets of mescaline, five sheets of high-powered blotter acid, a salt shaker half-full of cocaine and a whole galaxy of multicolored uppers, downers, screamers, laughers.... A quart of tequila, a quart of rum, a case of Budweiser, a pint of raw ether and two dozen amyls," which they manage to consume during their short tour.

On assignment from a sports...



Greetings from Andy
John Loring
0810949628
Oct 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Before achieving fame and glory as a leading Pop artist, Andy Warhol was a successful commercial artist who contributed illustrations to women's magazines and designed windows and promotional materials for department stores. Among his clients was Tiffany & Co., for whom he created a series of designs for holiday greeting cards. The whimsical drawings and paintings he produced for Tiffany's Christmas cards are the subject of this charming gift book.

Exuberant cherubs and acrobats, a reindeer snacking on watermelon, a playful monkey dangling an ornament from its tail, a gold-embossed Nativity, a high-heeled red ankle boot stuffed with holly, and Santa's sleigh packed with presents are among the 50 black-and-white and color illustrations featured here. In his preface, John Loring, Tiffany's design director,...


The Brothers and Sisters Learn to Write (Language and Literacy Series): Popular Literacies in Childhood and School Cultures
Anne Haas Dyson
0807742805
January 2003
Textbook Paperback
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The Wal-Mart Effect : How the World's Most Powerful Company Really Works--and How It's Transforming the American Economy
Charles Fishman
1594200769
January 19, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Fishman shops at Wal-Mart and has obvious affection for its price-cutting, hard-nosed ethos. He also understands that the story of Wal-Mart is really the story of the transformation of the American economy over the past 20 years. He's careful to present the consumer benefits of Wal-Mart's staggering growth and to place Wal-Mart in the larger context of globalization and the rise of mega-corporations. But he also presents the case against Wal-Mart in arresting detail, and his carefully balanced approach only makes the downside of Wal-Mart's market dominance more vivid. Through interviews with former Wal-Mart insiders and current suppliers, Fishman puts readers inside the company's penny-pinching mindset and shows how Wal-Mart's mania to reduce prices has driven suppliers into bankruptcy and sent factory jobs...


The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test
Tom Wolfe
0553380648
Oct 1999
Paperback
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Book Review
They say if you remember the '60s, you weren't there. But, fortunately, Tom Wolfe was there, notebook in hand, politely declining LSD while Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters fomented revolution, turning America on to a dangerously playful way of thinking as their Day-Glo conveyance, Further, made the most influential bus ride since Rosa Parks's. By taking On the Road's hero Neal Cassady as his driver on the cross-country revival tour and drawing on his own training as a magician, Kesey made Further into a bully pulpit, and linked the beat epoch with hippiedom. Paul McCartney's Many Years from Now cites Kesey as a key influence on his trippy Magical Mystery Tour film. Kesey temporarily renounced his literary magic for the cause of "tootling the multitudes"--making a spectacle of himself--and Prankster Robert Stone had to...


Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy (Popular Culture and Philosophy Series): Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale
James B. South
0812695313
March 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
How can Buffy's religious symbolism be squared with creator Joss Whedon's professed atheism? Is Buffy truly a Kierkegaardian knight of faith? Do Faith's corruption and return to the good life demonstrate Platonic eudaimonism? Or do they illustrate the flaws in Nietzsche's superman concept? What does the show's treatment of vampires, demons, and other entities say about ethical attitudes toward nonhumans? These are some of the questions asked and answered in this lively collection of essays that link classical philosophy to the long-running series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Buffy's status as the leading vehicle for exploring the evil underlying everyday life has made it ripe for the kind of witty, penetrating philosophical analysis this book delivers -- fully disintering the intellectual issues that underlie this cult...


Freakonomics CD : A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything [UNABRIDGED]
Steven D. Levitt, et al
0060776137
May 1, 2005
Audio CD
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Book Review
Economics is not widely considered to be one of the sexier sciences. The annual Nobel Prize winner in that field never receives as much publicity as his or her compatriots in peace, literature, or physics. But if such slights are based on the notion that economics is dull, or that economists are concerned only with finance itself, Steven D. Levitt will change some minds. In Freakonomics (written with Stephen J. Dubner), Levitt argues that many apparent mysteries of everyday life don't need to be so mysterious: they could be illuminated and made even more fascinating by asking the right questions and drawing connections. For example, Levitt traces the drop in violent crime rates to a drop in violent criminals and, digging further, to the Roe v. Wade decision that preempted the existence of some people who would be born to...


Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs
Chuck Klosterman
0743236017
Jan 2004
Paperback
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Book Review
There's quite a bit of intelligent analysis and thought-provoking insight packed into the pages of Chuck Klosterman's Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, which is a little surprising considering how darn stupid most of Klosterman's subject matter actually is. Klosterman, one of the few members of the so-called "Generation X" to proudly embrace that label and the stereotypical image of disaffected slackers that often accompanies it, takes the reader on a witty and highly entertaining tour through portions of pop culture not usually subjected to analysis and presents his thoughts on Saved by the Bell, Billy Joel, amateur porn, MTV's The Real World, and much more. It would be easy in dealing with such subject matter to simply pile on some undergraduate level deconstruction, make a few jokes, and have yourself a clever little book. But...


The Paradox of Choice : Why More Is Less
Barry Schwartz
0060005696
January 1, 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Like Thoreau and the band Devo, psychology professor Schwartz provides ample evidence that we are faced with far too many choices on a daily basis, providing an illusion of a multitude of options when few honestly different ones actually exist. The conclusions Schwartz draws will be familiar to anyone who has flipped through 900 eerily similar channels of cable television only to find that nothing good is on. Whether choosing a health-care plan, choosing a college class or even buying a pair of jeans, Schwartz, drawing extensively on his own work in the social sciences, shows that a bewildering array of choices floods our exhausted brains, ultimately restricting instead of freeing us. We normally assume in America that more options ("easy fit" or "relaxed fit"?) will make us happier, but Schwartz shows the...


Looking Awry: An Introduction to Jacques Lacan through Popular Culture (October Books)
Slavoj Zizek
026274015X
January 1991
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Slavoj Zizek, a leading intellectual in the new social movements in Eastern Europe, provides a virtuoso reading of the psychoanalytic theory of Jacques Lacan through the works of contemporary popular culture, from horror fiction and detective thrillers to popular romances and Hitchcock films.

Slavoj Zizek is a Researcher in the Institute of Sociology at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. He ran as a proreform candidate for the presidency of the republic of Slovenia, then part of Yugoslavia, in 1990.

About the Author
Slavoj Zizek is a Senior Researcher in the Department of Philosophy, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and Codirector of the Center for Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London.


The Left Stuff
Melissa Roth
1590770811
Sept 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book demystifies the place left-handness has held insociety,shedding new light on this controversial discussion.


The Leprechaun Companion
Niall Macnamara
0760713634
August 1999
Hardcover
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Famous Monster Movie Art Of Basil Gogos
Kerry Gammill (Editor), J. David Spurlock (Editor)
1887591710
April 1, 2005
Paperback
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Signs of Life in the USA: Readings on Popular Culture for Writers
Sonia Maasik
0312397844
December 2003
Textbook Paperback
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Everything Bad Is Good for You
Steven Johnson
1573223077
May 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
In his fourth book, Everything Bad Is Good for You, iconoclastic science writer Steven Johnson (who used himself as a test subject for the latest neurological technology in his last book, Mind Wide Open) takes on one of the most widely held preconceptions of the postmodern world--the belief that video games, television shows, and other forms of popular entertainment are detrimental to Americans' cognitive and moral development. Everything Good builds a case to the contrary that is engaging, thorough, and ultimately convincing.

The heart of Johnson's argument is something called the Sleeper Curve--a universe of popular entertainment that trends, intellectually speaking, ever upward, so that today's pop-culture consumer has to do more "cognitive work"--making snap decisions and coming up with long-term...



Polio : An American Story
David M. Oshinsky
0195152948
April 12, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The key protagonists in historian Oshinsky's (Univ. of Texas, Austin) account of the bruising scientific race to create a vaccine are Jonas Salk, a proponent of a "killed-virus" vaccine, and Albert Sabin, who championed the "live-virus" vaccine. As revered as these men are in popular culture, Oshinsky records their contemporaries' less complimentary opinions (even Sabin's friends, for instance, describe him as "arrogant, egotistical and occasionally cruel"). Oshinsky (A Conspiracy So Immense: The World of Joe McCarthy, etc.) looks at social context, too, such as the impact of the March of Dimes campaign on public consciousness—and fear—of polio. Tying in the role polio victim FDR played in making the effort a national priority, the precursory scientific developments that aided Salk and Sabin's work,...


Stars of David : Prominent Jews Talk About Being Jewish
Abigail Pogrebin
0767916123
October 25, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Consistently engaging, these 60 interviews conducted by journalist Pogrebin explore the thoughts of well-known artists, politicians and others in the public eye on the complexities of Jewish identity;and the emotions they engender. The issues touched on range from the legacy of the Holocaust to the Middle East, Jewish traditions, intermarriage and much more. The conflicts are typified by Sarah Jessica Parker, who says her supportive feelings about Israel in its conflict with the Palestinians make her feel more Jewish, but she is uncertain about the religious education she will give her child. Others, like Dustin Hoffman and William Kristol, have been firmly committed to passing on Jewish rituals and history to their children. Gloria Steinem, who joyfully attends feminist seders, still remains alienated by the...


Women Who Make the World Worse : and How Their Radical Feminist Assault Is Ruining Our Schools, Families, Military, and Sports
Kate O'Beirne
1595230092
December 29, 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The satirical cartoon cover of O'Beirne's book-not to mention the title-is an accurate reflection of the content within: O'Beirne, Washington editor of National Review magazine and a former vice president of the Heritage Foundation, has jumped on the bandwagon of highly politicized books (from both ends of the spectrum) leveling an all-out attack on the American feminist movement. O'Beirne tackles a wide range of issues, from childcare to sports to women in the military, claiming: "Only the French looked to a teenage girl to lead them into battle." She has a tendency to link strong arguments (children born into single-family homes are more likely to live in poverty) with her nebulous central thesis-feminists are responsible for the world's ills-without providing sufficient evidence to reinforce these claims. But...

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