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The Urban World

0072875410


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Book Description
As the leading text in urban sociology, The Urban World has maintained a complete, balanced, up-to-date, cross-cultural look at cities and suburbs around the world. It offers a twenty-first century look at the changing urban scene, covering evolving urban patterns and the changing nature of urban life, and combining current scholarship by one of America’s leading urban sociologists with a readable style that students appreciate.

About the Author
J. John Palen is the author of a dozen books on sociology and is a Professor of Sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University where he has received the College of Humanities and Sciences Distinguished Scholar Award. In 1997 he was designated a Fulbright Distinguished Scholar and has held the Fulbright Chair in North...


Being Heard : The Experiences of Young Women in Prostitution (Hurting and Healing series)

1552661016


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Book Description
The voices of young female prostitutes offer a chorus of disturbing firsthand perspectives on sexual exploitation and the inadequacies of government programs designed to help them in this account of the sex trade. To provide a full picture of the complex issues of the sex trade, discussions are included of health and safety concerns, the effect of prostitution on identity, the prevalence of violence, the legislation passed to protect prostitutes, the factors that force young women to become prostitutes, and the support required to facilitate their transition out of the sex trade. This candid look at a much-neglected, grisly reality provides perspectives on why social service agencies so often fail to help prostitutes.


Celebration
Michael Lassell
0786854057
Nov 2004
Hardcover
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Book Description
Celebration, Florida, is perhaps the most successful planned community in the country, having recently won a coveted Florida state civic award. What many people don't know is that Walt Disney's original concept for what later became Epcot® at Walt Disney World was exactly what Celebration is today-a thriving town where people live, work, go to school, attend to their health-care needs, shop, dine out, bank, and have myriad recreational opportunities. The richly illustrated Celebration: The Story of a Town explores the history of planned communities in America; the original concepts for Celebration complete with input from architects, social historians, and perhaps most important, local residents; and the ups and downs of this unique community as it establishes itself as one of Florida's most desired addresses. ...


The Wisdom of Crowds
James Surowiecki
0385721706
Aug 2005
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
While our culture generally trusts experts and distrusts the wisdom of the masses, New Yorker business columnist Surowiecki argues that "under the right circumstances, groups are remarkably intelligent, and are often smarter than the smartest people in them." To support this almost counterintuitive proposition, Surowiecki explores problems involving cognition (we're all trying to identify a correct answer), coordination (we need to synchronize our individual activities with others) and cooperation (we have to act together despite our self-interest). His rubric, then, covers a range of problems, including driving in traffic, competing on TV game shows, maximizing stock market performance, voting for political candidates, navigating busy sidewalks, tracking SARS and designing Internet search engines like Google. If...


Methods of Discovery: Heuristics for the Social Sciences (Contemporary Societies)

0393978141


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Book Description
Methods of Discovery is organized around strategies for deepening arguments in order to find the best ways to study social phenomena. This exciting book is not about the mechanics of doing social science research, but about habits of thinking that enable students to use those mechanics in new ways, by coming up with new ideas and combining them more effectively with old ones. Examples from throughout the social sciences help show how these moves can open new lines of thinking. Each chapter covers several moves and their reverses (if these exist), discussing particular examples of the move as well as its logical and theoretical structure. This book offers readers a new way of thinking about directions for their research and new ways to imagine information relevant to their research problems.


The World Is Flat [Updated and Expanded] : A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century
Thomas L. Friedman
0374292795
April 18, 2006
Hardcover
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Book Review
Updated Edition: Thomas L. Friedman is not so much a futurist, which he is sometimes called, as a presentist. His aim in The World Is Flat, as in his earlier, influential Lexus and the Olive Tree, is not to give you a speculative preview of the wonders that are sure to come in your lifetime, but rather to get you caught up on the wonders that are already here. The world isn't going to be flat, it is flat, which gives Friedman's breathless narrative much of its urgency, and which also saves it from the Epcot-style polyester sheen that futurists--the optimistic ones at least--are inevitably prey to.

What Friedman means by "flat" is "connected": the lowering of trade and political barriers and the exponential technical advances of the digital revolution that have made it possible to do business,...



Hope in the Unseen
Ron Suskind
0767901266
Jan 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
Ron Suskind won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 1995 for his stories on Cedric Jennings, a talented black teenager struggling to succeed in one of the worst public high schools in Washington, D.C. Suskind has expanded those features into a full-length nonfiction narrative, following Jennings beyond his high-school graduation to Brown University, and in the tradition of Leon Dash's Rosa Lee and Alex Kotlowitz's There Are No Children Here, delivers a compelling story on the struggles of inner-city life in modern America. While it appears to have a happy ending (with Jennings earning a B average in his sophomore year), A Hope in the Unseen is not without a few caveats (at times, Jennings feels profoundly alienated from his white peers). Trite as it may sound to say, this book teaches a lesson about the virtue of...


740 Park
Michael Gross
0385512090
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Of all Manhattan's fabled East Side dwellings of the super-rich, 740 Park Avenue has perhaps the best pedigree. Designed by Rosario Candela and developed by James T. Lee, Jackie O's maternal grandfather, as a cooperative haven for the elite, it had the misfortune to open just as the stock market crashed in 1930 and was forced to operate partly as a rental for some decades. The last sale was to Lee himself, for son-in-law "Black Jack" Bouvier, his wife and daughters Jackie and Lee. John D. Rockefeller Jr. signed a rental lease in 1936 for a massive apartment (more than 20,000 square feet), and Marshall Field III took another. Gross (Model) has solidly researched the denizens of the building, who they were, what they did, and who and how many times they married. This information, while exhaustive, is also...


The Omnivore's Dilemma : A Natural History of Four Meals
Michael Pollan
1594200823
April 11, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Pamela KaufmanPollan (The Botany of Desire) examines what he calls "our national eating disorder" (the Atkins craze, the precipitous rise in obesity) in this remarkably clearheaded book. It's a fascinating journey up and down the food chain, one that might change the way you read the label on a frozen dinner, dig into a steak or decide whether to buy organic eggs. You'll certainly never look at a Chicken McNugget the same way again.Pollan approaches his mission not as an activist but as a naturalist: "The way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world." All food, he points out, originates with plants, animals and fungi. "[E]ven the deathless Twinkie is constructed out of... well, precisely what I don't know offhand, but ultimately some sort of formerly living...


Good to Great and the Social Sectors: A Monograph to Accompany Good to Great
Jim Collins
0977326403
November 30, 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
Jim Collins Answers the Social Sector with a Monograph to Accompany Good to Great. 30-50% of those who bought Good to Great work in the Social Sector. This monograph is a response to questions raised by readers in the social sector. It is not a new book. Jim Collins wants to avoid any confusion about the monograph being a book by limiting its distribution to online retailers. Based on interviews and workshops with over 100 social sector leaders. The difference between successful organizations is not between the business and the social sector, the difference is between good organizations and great ones.

About the Author
Jim Collins is a student and teacher of enduring great companies -- how they grow, how they attain superior performance, and how good...


Letters to Karen
Charlie W. Shedd
068721565X
Dec 1993
Paperback
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Book Description
Karen Shedd was away at college and had recently become engaged. Looking forward to a long and happy union, she wrote to her father for advice. Dr. Shedd, a popular minister and father of five, began writing Karen a series of letters on keeping love in marriage. They were eventually published in a collection that soon became one of the most widely quoted and bestselling books of our time. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.


Home Invasion
Rebecca Hagelin
1595550070
Apr 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Middle class moms and dads have long sought safety for their children in the nurturing haven of the cul-de-sac. Like a safe harbor at the edge of an angry sea, the suburban neighborhood is an environment of protection from the world and all its dangers. Or is it? In Home Invasion, Rebecca Hagelin proves that in today's all-consuming culture of corruption there is nowhere left to hide-American homes have already been invaded by this insidious enemy that seeks to twist our minds and poison our hearts through the unmonitored Internet, television, magazines, and music that our families ingest on a daily basis. Speaking as a nationally known social commentator and as a mother of three, Hagelin shows through specific examples and alarming statistics how the enemy has infected the family van, our neighborhood schools...


In Cold Blood
Truman Capote
0679745580
February 1, 1994
Paperback
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Book Review
"Until one morning in mid-November of 1959, few Americans--in fact, few Kansans--had ever heard of Holcomb. Like the waters of the river, like the motorists on the highway, and like the yellow trains streaking down the Santa Fe tracks, drama, in the shape of exceptional happenings, had never stopped there." If all Truman Capote did was invent a new genre--journalism written with the language and structure of literature--this "nonfiction novel" about the brutal slaying of the Clutter family by two would-be robbers would be remembered as a trail-blazing experiment that has influenced countless writers. But Capote achieved more than that. He wrote a true masterpiece of creative nonfiction. The images of this tale continue to resonate in our minds: 16-year-old Nancy Clutter teaching a friend how to bake a cherry pie, Dick...


The Covenant with Black America
Tavis Smiley (Editor)
0883782774
January 1, 2006
Paperback
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Book Description
Six years' worth of symposiums come together in this rich collection of essays that plot a course for African Americans, explaining how individuals and households can make changes that will immediately improve their circumstances in areas ranging from health and education to crime reduction and financial well-being. Addressing these pressing concerns are contributors Dr. David Satcher, former U.S. surgeon general; Wade Henderson, executive director of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights; Angela Glover Blackwell, founder of the research think tank PolicyLink; and Cornel West, professor of Religion at Princeton University. Each chapter outlines one key issue and provides a list of resources, suggestions for action, and a checklist for what concerned citizens can do to keep their communities progressing...


Amazing Grace
Jonathan Kozol
0060976977
Nov 1996
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Kozol (Savage Inequalities) began visiting New York's South Bronx in 1993, focusing on Mott Haven, a poor neighborhood that is two thirds Hispanic, one third black. This disquieting report graphically portrays a world where babies are born to drug-using mothers with AIDS, where children are frequently murdered, jobs are scarce and a large proportion of the men are either in prison or on crack cocaine or heroin. Kozol interviewed ministers, teachers, drug pushers, children who have not yet given up hope. His powerfully understated report takes us inside rat-infested homes that are freezing in winter, overcrowded schools, dysfunctional clinics, soup kitchens. Rejecting what he calls the punitive, blame-the-poor ideology that has swept the nation, Kozol points to systemic discrimination, hopelessness, limited...


The Great Transformation : The Beginning of Our Religious Traditions
Karen Armstrong
0375413170
March 28, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Having already recounted "a history of God," the redoubtable Armstrong here narrates the evolution of the religious traditions of the world from their births to their maturity. In her typical magisterial fashion, she chronicles these tales in dazzling prose with remarkable depth and judicious breadth. Taking the Axial Age, which spans roughly 900 B.C.E. to 200 B.C.E., as her focal point, Armstrong examines the ways that specific religious traditions from Buddhism and Confucianism to Taoism and Judaism responded to the various cultural forces they faced during this period. Overall, Armstrong observes, violence, political disruption and religious intolerance dominated Axial Age societies, so Axial religions responded by exalting compassion, love and justice over selfishness and hatred. Thus, the...


The Cube and the Cathedral
George Weigel
0465092667
Apr 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Paris's modernist La Grande Arche de la Défense and the Gothic Cathedral of Notre-Dame serve as metaphors for papal biographer Weigel's (Witness to Hope) examination of what has happened to Europe in the last several decades and its significance to Americans. Weigel, an American Catholic theologian who has lived and worked on the continent, defines the "Europe problem" as the sharp divergence of European views on democracy, the world and politics from those held by Americans like himself. For him, La Grande Arche ("The Cube") symbolizes the new Europe, retreating from democracy, en route to depoliticization, enamored of international organizations and intellectually Christophobic. Notre-Dame, which guidebooks claim would fit inside the Cube, embodies Europe's Christian history, now strangely absent from...


Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America
Barbara Ehrenreich
0805063897
May 1, 2002
Paperback
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Book Review's Best of 2001
Essayist and cultural critic Barbara Ehrenreich has always specialized in turning received wisdom on its head with intelligence, clarity, and verve. With some 12 million women being pushed into the labor market by welfare reform, she decided to do some good old-fashioned journalism and find out just how they were going to survive on the wages of the unskilled--at $6 to $7 an hour, only half of what is considered a living wage. So she did what millions of Americans do, she looked for a job and a place to live, worked that job, and tried to make ends meet.

As a waitress in Florida, where her name is suddenly transposed to "girl," trailer trash becomes a demographic category to aspire to with rent at $675 per month. In Maine, where she ends up working as both a cleaning woman and a nursing home assistant,...



Sundown Towns
James W. Loewen
156584887X
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. According to bestselling sociologist Loewen (Lies My Teacher Told Me), "something significant has been left out of the broad history of race in America as it is usually taught," namely the establishment between 1890 and 1968 of thousands of "sundown towns" that systematically excluded African-Americans from living within their borders. Located mostly outside the traditional South, these towns employed legal formalities, race riots, policemen, bricks, fires and guns to produce homogeneously Caucasian communities—and some of them continue such unsavory practices to this day. Loewen's eye-opening history traces the sundown town's development and delineates the extent to which state governments and the federal government, "openly favor[ed] white supremacy" from the 1930s through the 1960s,...


The Game: Penetrating the Secret Society of Pickup Artists
Neil Strauss
0060554738
September 1, 2005
Leather Bound
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From Publishers Weekly
[Signature]Reviewed by Amy SohnI never dated Neil Strauss, but I dated guys like him. Like many New York women, I have always gone for balding, pale guys because they're grateful and good in bed. But a few years ago, a distraught Strauss decided he was a loser with women and set about transforming himself into the world's greatest pick-up artist. The Game is his long, often tedious but hilarious account of how he did it. This ugly-duckling tale will affect different readers in different ways, depending on their degree of cynicism: some will be awed by Strauss's ménage-à-trois snowball scene, while others will suspect it was cribbed from a third-rate porno Strauss watched in his pre-macking days.When his story begins Strauss is, well, a Neil: an unconfident, self-described AFC (average frustrated chump). He is also,...


How Full Is Your Bucket Positive Strategies for Work and Life
Tom Rath, Donald O. Clifton
1595620036
August 10, 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In this brief but significant book, the authors, a grandfather-grandson team, explore how using positive psychology in everyday interactions can dramatically change our lives. Clifton (coauthor of Now, Discover Your Strengths) and Rath suggest that we all have a bucket within us that needs to be filled with positive experiences, such as recognition or praise. When we're negative toward others, we use a dipper to remove from their buckets and diminish their positive outlook. When we treat others in a positive manner, we fill not only their buckets but ours as well. The authors illustrate how this principle works in the areas of business and management, marriage and other personal relationships and in parenting through studies covering a 40-year span, many in association with the Gallup Poll. While acknowledging...


The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference
Malcolm Gladwell
0316346624
January 7, 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
"The best way to understand the dramatic transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life," writes Malcolm Gladwell, "is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do." Although anyone familiar with the theory of memetics will recognize this concept, Gladwell's The Tipping Point has quite a few interesting twists on the subject.

For example, Paul Revere was able to galvanize the forces of resistance so effectively in part because he was what Gladwell calls a "Connector": he knew just about everybody, particularly the revolutionary leaders in each of the towns that he rode through. But Revere "wasn't just the man with the biggest Rolodex in...


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