Book Finder
    
 
> Religion > Judaism > Kosher Foods
 

Kosher Gourmet
Street Y. 92nd Street y. Cooking School
044990959X
Oct 1994
Paperback
·
 
Review
"The perfect gift for readers who love to cook, novice cooks who need well-researched directions, and everyone who loves to eat, this volume won't languish on the shelf." -- Country Living

Review
"The perfect gift for readers who love to cook, novice cooks who need well-researched directions, and everyone who loves to eat, this volume won't languish on the shelf." -- Country Living

See all Editorial Reviews


Kosher by Design: Picture-Perfect Food for the Holidays & Every Day
Susie Fishbein
1578197074
May 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Fishbein, editor of the highly popular and successful Kosher Palette, has produced a cookbook focusing on elegant kosher cuisine that is easy to produce by the modern at-home cook. She precedes each section with a description of a festival and its customs, and includes a suggested menu and kosher wine list. Interspersed with vibrant color photographs, the recipes make full use of the growing range of kosher ingredients available, and she has no compunction in saving time and effort by using store-bought sauces in some dishes, such as Tarragon Chicken. Traditional recipes also appear, but are usually given a new twist-the visually pleasing Tri-color Gefilte Fish once again utilizes a store-bought item but enhances both it and the conventional presentation by layering to make a terrine. Useful tips are added where...


California Kosher: Contemporary and Traditional Jewish Cuisine
Pearl Roseman (Editor)
0963095307
December 1991
Other Format
·
 


Olive Trees and Honey : A Treasury of Vegetarian Recipes from Jewish Communities Around the World
Gil Marks
0764544136
November 12, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“…doesn’t shy away from recognising the cultural, historical, and religious relevance of traditional foods” (Jewish Tribune, 14th October 2004)

Book Description
"A land of wheat and barley, of grape vines and fig trees and pomegranates; a land of olive trees and honey . . . you shall eat and be satisfied." —Deut. 8:8-10

A Celebration of Classic Jewish Vegetarian Cooking from Around the World

Traditions of Jewish vegetarian cooking span three millennia and the extraordinary geographical breadth of the Jewish diaspora—from Persia to Ethiopia, Romania to France. Acclaimed Judaic cooking expert, chef, and rabbi Gil Marks uncovers this vibrant culinary heritage for home cooks. Olive Trees...


Jewish Cooking for All Seasons
Laura Frankel
0764571842
Aug 2006
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
You can say one thing for this collection of modern kosher recipes"it ain't chopped liver. That fatty, flavorful favorite is replaced with fancy-schmancy fare like Artichoke Confit and Fava Bean Salad. Frankel, owner of Shallots restaurant in Chicago, deserves credit for widening the horizons of kosher cooking, as she incorporates novelties such as venison (Ginger-Marinated Venison Loin with Purple Sticky Rice and Spring Pea Salad) and bison (Bison, Lettuce and Tomato sandwiches). Dishes are grouped by season, but despite the promising subtitle, there are no holiday menus included. Chatty prose abounds in sidebars ("It may sound a little silly to say that I am passionate about salmon. Nevertheless... I am!"). There's nothing especially Jewish about Grilled Marinated Short Ribs with Spicy Fruit Barbecue Sauce or...


Kosher Living
Ron Isaacs
0787976423
Mar 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. Food is just one of the 44 topics in this broad-based approach to what's kosher and what's not for Jews. "The word kosher has come to mean... the correct way to do something according to Jewish law and tradition," explains Isaacs. The book not only covers the expected Jewish topics—circumcision, marriage, prayer, Shabbat, synagogue behavior and more—but also intriguing items of general interest, such as employer-employee relations, shopping and even war. The alphabetical q&a format makes the book easy to navigate and explore. Each section is divided into two parts: "What's kosher" and "What's not kosher," followed by "expert" and primary sources. Isaacs acknowledges that his guide in no way constitutes a definitive code of Jewish law, but his succinct answers clarify thorny issues...


Kosher by Design Kids in the Kitchen
Susie Fishbein
1578190711
November 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Simple enough to give a child confidence and interesting enough to engage the parental chef, these kid-friendly recipes and helpful tips introduce the techniques known by every good kosher cook. Each recipe comes with an equipment list, an ingredient list, and a photo of every scrumptious dish.


Soup--a Kosher Collection
Pamela Reiss
1590770749
February 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
From Chicken Broth with Matzo Balls to Strawberry Sambuca Soup, Reiss serves up over 100 kosher soups from around the world in this short, focused collection. The recipes are straightforward and simple; rarely do the instructions take more than half a page. One notable exception is the delicious Asian-inspired Shredded Duck Soup, just one of the book's many exotic preparations. Others include Chocolate Soup, billed as a perfect Passover dessert, Thai Chicken and Coconut Soup with lemongrass, and what could be a college hit: Beer Cheese Soup, garnished with popcorn. Throughout the volume, Reiss's instructions are helpful and laid-back: "I like the consistency to be a little looser than baby food, but it's all about how you like it!" she writes about Roasted Acorn Squash Soup. Enthusiasm abounds; every other recipe...


Kosher Food Production
Zushe Yosef Blech
0813825709
Nov 2004
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
Following an introduction to basic Kosher laws and theory, author Blech details the essential food production procedures required of modern food plants to meet Kosher certification standards. Chapters on Kosher application include ingredient management; rabbinic etiquette; Kosher for Passover; fruits and vegetables; food service; and the industries of baking, biotechnology, dairy, fish, flavor, meat and poultry, and oils, fats, and emulsifiers. A collection of informative and entertaining articles - specifically geared to the secular audience of food scientists - then follows, giving readers insight and understanding of the concerns behind the Kosher laws they are expected to accommodate.Kosher Food Production serves as an indispensable outline of the issues confronting the application of Kosher law to issues of modern...


International Cooking for the Jewish Home
Betty S. Goldberg
082460346X
Nov 1990
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
In a carefully prepared and often enticing collection, the author of Chinese Kosher Cooking adapts international dishes to the American palate and to kosher dietary restrictions. Veal (instead of pork) scrapple, chicken Kiev stuffed with pareve margarine seasoned with parsley and dill, and seafood-free paella are typical of recipes avoiding prohibited foods or food combinations. Cooks following kosher guidelines who want to try some new flavors will find much to enjoy in the recipes and in the discussions opening each chapter. From Europe there is cottage cheese "strudel," cream of mushroom soup and broccoli with garlic sauce. Basted herb-and-spice chicken, duck in pomegranate sauce, and nut rolls in honey syrup originate in the Middle East. Asia and the Pacific Islands contribute spicy vegetable fritters, fish...


The Foods of Israel Today
Joan Nathan
0679451072
March 6, 2001
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Modern Israel is one of the world's great culinary melting pots, and Nathan (author of the highly successful PBS series and cookbook Jewish Cooking in America) does it justice in this exceptional and comprehensive examination of its diverse cultural lineage. Israeli flavors include those of the Middle East like Classic Israeli Eggplant Dip, new inventions such as Israeli Revisionist Haroset and imported traditions like Judith Tihany's Transylvanian Green Bean Soup. Nathan collects recipes from both ordinary Israelis including 97-year-old Shoshana Kleiner, whose instruction for her Fourth Aliyah Vegetable Soup is "Cook until cooked!" and popular restaurants, such as Jerusalem's Eucalyptus. Nor are local Arabic traditions given short shrift, spotlighting dishes like Zucchini with Yogurt. The book also offers...


Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors
Lizzie Collingham
0195172418
December 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. There's nothing like trying to represent the food of India on a two-page menu to raise tricky questions about authenticity and mass taste. Isn't curry really a British invention? Does chicken tikka masala have anything to do with Indian food? Fortunately, Cambridge-trained historian Collingham supplies a welcome corrective: the cuisine of the Indian subcontinent has always been in glorious flux, and the popularity of chicken vindaloo on London's Brick Lane or New York's Curry Row (and beyond) is no simple betrayal of the cuisine. (As far as charges of cultural imperialism go, if it weren't for the Portuguese, the chilli pepper never would have had its massive impact on the region's delicacies.) Easy stratifications wilt in the face of fact: Hindu and Muslim culinary traditions have been...


Levana's Table : Kosher Cooking for Everyone [BARGAIN PRICE]
Levana Kirschenbaum
B0002RQ230
October 1, 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This cookbook, by the proprietor of the celebrated Levana Restaurant and Bakery in Manhattan, offers150 recipes and 20 menus that are simple, nutritious, beautifully presented, and 100 percent kosher. Traditional kosher fare, including food for the holidays and entertaining is featured, along with recipes that reflect the author's Moroccan, French, Asian, and vegetarian influences. 150 recipes, 30 color photographs. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


The Hadassah Jewish Holiday Cookbook: Traditional Recipes from the Contemporary Kosher Kitchens
Joan Schwartz Michel (Editor)
0883636034
February 2003
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Hadassah is a Jewish organization similar to the Junior League and like the latter has periodically published local Hadassah cookbooks. Now for the first time they have produced a national Hadassah cookbook, filling it with time-honored and well-tested favorites, many with a modern twist. Based on the Jewish festival calendar, the book is divided seasonally, starting with the Sabbath and working through the festivals from the New Year to the Shavuot spring festival. Each section includes wonderful topical commentaries by such well-known Jewish food writers as Joan Nathan, Claudia Roden and Steven Raichlen. The recipes are provided by Hadassah members from throughout the U.S. and Israel who impart family heirlooms, traditional favorites and modern variations ranging from the classic Traditional Chicken Soup and...


Kosher Cookery
Frances R. AvRutick
0824603524
Apr 1991
Paperback
·
 
Canadian Jewish News
"Offers mouthwatering proof that kosher cuisine has kept up with the times."

Book Description
The author of the acclaimed Complete Passover Cookbook serves up a cornucopia of delicious dishes from the Old World and the Newpreparations as varied as Russian Cabbage Borscht, Oriental Chicken Salad, Gefilte Hoete (stuffed flank skin), Vegetable Pt, Prune and Potato Tzimmes, Salmon Pasta, and Cheese Roulades.

See all Editorial Reviews


The Mensch Chef: Or Why Delicious Jewish Food Isn't an Oxymoron
Mitchell Davis
0609807811


·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Davis, author of Foie Gras and Cook Something, draws on his Ashkenazi (European Jewish) heritage and family recipes to produce The Mensch Chef. The recipes include familiar Jewish fare like his hearty Chicken Soup and Matzo Balls, Basic Brisket and Gefilte Fish. Several traditional recipes are given tasty new twists, from the slight citric bite of the sweet Apple-Orange Lokshen Kugel to the Baked Fish in Sweet-and-Sour Sauce. Some dishes, like the robust Hummus and the healthy Carrot and Raisin Salad, are more modern Israeli than Old Country, but are growing popular at Jewish tables. The kosher status of each recipe meat, dairy, pareve, or pesadich is indicated, and where appropriate Davis provides alternative versions of recipes that take dietary laws into account. The Pareve Rugelach, for instance, are made...


Matzoh Ball Gumbo: Culinary Tales of the Jewish South
Marcie Cohen Ferris
0807829781
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Many traditional Southern foods—pulled-pork barbecue, crab cakes, fried oyster po' boys, to name a few—violate traditional Jewish dietary laws, which forbid the consumption of pork and shellfish. What's a Southern Jew to do? Anthropological historian Ferris (UNC–Chapel Hill) answers that question in a gustatory tour of the Jewish South. She uncovers many dishes that blend Jewish and Southern foodways (recipes included for such tasties as Temple Israel Brisket and Cornmeal-Fried Fish Fillets with Sephardic Vinagre Sauce). Ferris sees food as a symbol that encompasses the problem of how Jews live in a region dominated by Christians: "The most tangible way to understand Jewish history and culture in the South is at the dinner table." Cynics will wonder if a Jewish kugel (noodle casserole) prepared...


Kosher for Everybody: The Complete Guide to Understanding, Shopping, Cooking, and Eating the Kosher Way (Arthur Kurzweil Book)
Trudy Garfunkel
0787975877
August 17, 2004
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
This is certainly one of most up-to-date and user-friendly English guides to keeping kosher. One fascinating chapter surveys the history of kosher-keeping in America (did you know that Revolutionary-era Jews in Rhode Island "subsist[ed] on chocolate and coffee" for want of kosher meat?). The rest of the book is decidedly practical: Garfunkel (The Kosher Companion) rehearses the origins of the Jewish dietary laws and reviews the basic rules—e.g., meat products and dairy must be eaten separately, while some foods, like shellfish and pork, are flat-out forbidden. She explains how to decode the symbols that indicate a packaged food is certifiably kosher, and lists many (though by no means all) national products, from Celestial Seasonings tea to Planter's peanut butter, that have obtained kosher certification....


The Book of Jewish Food: An Odyssey from Samarkand to New York
Claudia Roden
0394532589
December 1996
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Claudia Roden, author of The Book of Jewish Food, has done more than simply compile a cookbook of Jewish recipes--she has produced a history of the Jewish diaspora, told through its cuisine. The book's 800 recipes reflect many cultures and regions of the world, from the Jewish quarter of Cairo where Roden spent her childhood to the kitchens of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Both Ashkenazi and Sepharidic cooking are well represented here: hallah bread, bagels, blintzes, and kugels give way to tabbouleh, falafel, and succulent lamb with prunes, which are, in turn, succeeded by such fare as Ftut (Yemeni wedding soup) and Kahk (savory bracelets). Interwoven throughout the text are Roden's charming asides--the history of certain foods, definitions (Kaimak, for instance, is the cream that rises to the top when buffalo milk is...


Levana's Table
Levana Kirschenbaum
1584792736
Oct 2002
Hardcover
·
 
Book Description
This cookbook, by the proprietor of the celebrated Levana Restaurant and Bakery in Manhattan, offers150 recipes and 20 menus that are simple, nutritious, beautifully presented, and 100 percent kosher. Traditional kosher fare, including food for the holidays and entertaining is featured, along with recipes that reflect the author's Moroccan, French, Asian, and vegetarian influences. 150 recipes, 30 color photographs.


The New York Times Passover Cookbook: More than 200 Holiday Recipes from Top Chefs and Writers
Linda Amster
0688155901
March 1999
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Finally, you can put aside those yellowed newspaper clippings this holiday! The New York Times Passover Cookbook collects almost 50 years' worth of delicious Seder recipes from the Times and its contributors, from Florence Fabricant's Classic Gefilte Fish to Barry Wine's Tsimmes Terrine. With more than 200 recipes, the book travels around the world of Jewish cuisine, from Artichokes, Sephardic Style--a spicy, fried, Egyptian dish--to Mississippi Praline Macaroons, a recipe that traveled with its originator from Vienna, Austria, to Natchez, Mississippi. Because the book includes recipes from both Ashkenazic and Sephardic traditions, editor Linda Amster notes that the ingredients in some recipes may not be acceptable to other communities (for example, the allspice in Claudia Roden's Matzoh-Meat Pie perfectly reflects its...


Kosher Cooking
Marlena Spieler
1842159429
July 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Over 70 inspirational recipes, from appetizers to main courses and accompaniments to desserts.


How to Keep Kosher : A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding Jewish Dietary Laws
Lise Stern
0060515007
September 1, 2004
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
For some, keeping kosher is as simple as eschewing bacon and cheeseburgers. For others, keeping kosher is a complex series of rituals that may appear intimidating to the uninitiated. Whether readers are simply curious or are considering keeping kosher themselves, Stern's resource is a good place to start. The author, a conservative Jew who started keeping kosher as a young girl, provides a clear, concise summary of Jewish dietary restrictions. This isn't a simplistic overview, but a serious and impressively researched digest that tackles basic and complex issues, and examines the historical and legal reasoning behind the laws. Stern offers both Orthodox and conservative opinions on a range of issues, from what's considered an appropriate hechsher, or symbol, to how to make a kitchen kosher, and she discusses the...


Kosher for the Clueless but Curious: A Fun, Fact-Filled, and Spiritual Guide to All Things Kosher
Shimon Apisdorf
1881927318
November 2005
Paperback
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Ever wondered what makes kosher food kosher? Why is keeping kosher important to Jews, anyway-does God really care what we eat? Apisdorf, an Orthodox rabbi, has the answers. With a sense of humor and a light touch, he lays out the basics of the Jewish dietary laws-what foods (like pork, snails and shrimp) are forbidden; how to tell if prepared food bought at the store is kosher. He dispels many myths about the Jewish dietary laws. For example, contrary to popular belief, "kosher" does not mean that food has been blessed by a rabbi. Apisdorf also addresses pastoral questions, gently suggesting that Jews who want to start keeping kosher don't take on all the dietary laws at once: they should begin by cutting out one non-kosher food, and gradually move toward a more complete observance of the whole dietary code....


Jewish Food : The World at Table
Matthew Goodman
0060521287
March 1, 2005
Hardcover
·
 
From Publishers Weekly
Jewish food is almost too huge a topic to be covered exhaustively, but Goodman, the "Food Maven" columnist at the Forward, takes a decent stab at it by dividing his book into chapters on appetizers, soups, fish, eggs and dairy, poultry, meat, kugels, breads, and desserts and interspersing them with essays pertaining to peoples, ingredients and dishes. For example, in the chapter on fish, Goodman spotlights a Jewish community in Northern Morocco, where one woman saved the almost lost language Jaquetia (a combination of Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic and Berber). A recipe for Pescado en Colorado (fish in tomato sauce with peppers and paprika), popular in that region, follows. In the poultry chapter, a piece on pomegranates explores the contention that the fruit on the tree of knowledge was not an apple, but a pomegranate;...


Kosher Kettle
Sybil R. Kaplan
1877749192
Jan 2003
Paperback
·
 

  ©BookFinder USA LLC.
  All rights reserved.