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The Road to Reality
Roger Penrose
0679454438
Feb 2005
Hardcover
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Book Review
If Albert Einstein were alive, he would have a copy of The Road to Reality on his bookshelf. So would Isaac Newton. This may be the most complete mathematical explanation of the universe yet published, and Roger Penrose richly deserves the accolades he will receive for it. That said, let us be perfectly clear: this is not an easy book to read. The number of people in the world who can understand everything in it could probably take a taxi together to Penrose's next lecture. Still, math-friendly readers looking for a substantial and possibly even thrillingly difficult intellectual experience should pick up a copy (carefully--it's over a thousand pages long and weighs nearly 4 pounds) and start at the beginning, where Penrose sets out his purpose: to describe "the search for the underlying principles that govern the behavior...


My Life as a Quant: Reflections on Physics and Finance
Emanuel Derman
0471394203
September 2004
Hardcover
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Review
“engaging” (CFO Europe, October 2005)

"...tells wonderful stories of trying to bring higher mathematics to the Goldman Sachs equity-derivatives trading desk." (Grant's Interest Rate Observer, Dec. 17, 2004)

Not many Wall Street veterans could write: "Visiting clients in Madrid, I dropped into the Thyssen museum, where I stumbled across several [Arthur] Dove paintings . . . in The Hague, too, after a Euronext options conference, I saw early Mondrian paintings of lilies that were influenced by [Rudolf] Steiner".
There are few "gentlemen bankers" left these days. Nor is there much room in the great financial houses for anything that smacks of the amateur spirit. That is why Emanuel Derman's memoirs are so compelling. As a physicist with a PhD from Columbia University, New York,...



E=mc2
David Bodanis
0425181642
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
E=mc2. Just about everyone has at least heard of Albert Einstein's formulation of 1905, which came into the world as something of an afterthought. But far fewer can explain his insightful linkage of energy to mass. David Bodanis offers an easily grasped gloss on the equation. Mass, he writes, "is simply the ultimate type of condensed or concentrated energy," whereas energy "is what billows out as an alternate form of mass under the right circumstances."

Just what those circumstances are occupies much of Bodanis's book, which pays homage to Einstein and, just as important, to predecessors such as Maxwell, Faraday, and Lavoisier, who are not as well known as Einstein today. Balancing writerly energy and scholarly weight, Bodanis offers a primer in modern physics and cosmology, explaining that the universe today is an...



Programming the Universe : A Quantum Computer Scientist Takes On the Cosmos
Seth Lloyd
1400040922
March 14, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Lloyd, a professor at MIT, works in the vanguard of research in quantum computing: using the quantum mechanical properties of atoms as a computer. He contends that the universe itself is one big quantum computer producing what we see around us, and ourselves, as it runs a cosmic program. According to Lloyd, once we understand the laws of physics completely, we will be able to use small-scale quantum computing to understand the universe completely as well. In his scenario, the universe is processing information. The second law of thermodynamics (disorder increases) is all about information, and Lloyd spends much of the book explaining how quantum processes convey information. The creation of the universe itself involved information processing: random fluctuations in the quantum foam, like a random number generator...


The Cosmic Landscape
Leonard Susskind
0316155799
Dec 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. As modern physics has developed a better understanding of how the universe operates at its most fundamental levels, one thing has become increasingly clear: we're damned lucky to be here at all. The laws of physics are precariously balanced, and were the value of one constant slightly different, life as we know it wouldn't exist. To explain the ridiculous improbability of it all, some physicists have turned to the "Anthropic Principle": the universe seems perfectly tailored to us because if it weren't, we wouldn't be here to observe it. The underlying rationale for this argument involves the "landscape" of potential laws of physics (which, it turns out, aren't so immutable after all), a whole bunch of extra dimensions and lots of particle physics. Luckily, Susskind—the father of string...


Theoretical Physics
Georg Joos
0486652270
March 1987
Paperback
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Book Description
Classic one-volume treatise covers mathematical topics needed by theoretical and experimental physicists (vector analysis, calculus of variations, etc.),followed by extensive coverage of mechanics, electromagnetic theory, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics and nuclear physics. First paperback edition of indispensable reference for graduates and undergraduates.


Hyperspace
Michio Kaku
0385477058
Feb 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
How many dimensions do you live in? Three? Maybe that's all your commonsense sense perception perceives, but there is growing and compelling evidence to suggest that we actually live in a universe of ten real dimensions. Kaku has written an extraordinarily lucid and thought-provoking exploration of the theoretical and empirical bases of a ten-dimensional universe and even goes so far as to discuss possible practical implications--such as being able to escape the collapse of the universe. Yikes. Highly Recommended.

From Publishers Weekly
Since ingesting Einstein's relativity theory 50 years ago, physics fell down a quantum rabbit hole and, ever since, physicists' reports to the world of popular science have been curiouser and curiouser. This version, from the author of the graduate...


Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences
Mary L. Boas
0471198269
July 22, 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Now in its third edition, Mathematical Concepts in the Physical Sciences provides a comprehensive introduction to the areas of mathematical physics. It combines all the essential math concepts into one compact, clearly written reference.

The publisher, John Wiley & Sons
Solutions Manual available. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

See all Editorial Reviews


Quantum Computation and Quantum Information
Michael A. Nielsen, Isaac L. Chuang
0521635039
September 2000
Paperback
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Review
'... Although the field of quantum information and computation is evolving rapidly, this book was written just after the basic algorithmic and physical tools of the field had reached a standard form. and so the text contains essentially all of the material that might be covered in a course on quantum information. I used it as a textbook for an introductory course in quantum computation at my institute. At the end of the term, the class was polled on various aspects of the book. The response was uniformly positive ... A rigorous, comprehensive text on quantum information is timely ... Quantum Computation and Quantum Information is a must-read for the generation of budding quantum-mechanical engineers who will build the technologies of the future.' Seth Lloyd, Nature
'Nielsen and Chuang have set a high standard.'...


E=mc2
David Bodanis
0802714633
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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Review
"No one makes complex science more fascinating and accessible than David Bodanis." --Bill Bryson

"A lucid, even thrilling study: the very best kind of science journalism." --Fay Weldon, Washington Post

"For the first time, I really feel that I understand the meaning and implications of that equation…there is a great 'aha!' awaiting the lay reader." --St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Even people who approach physics and mathematics with trepidation will be fascinated and enlightened by this dazzling book." --Parade


Divine Proportion: Phi in Art, Nature and Science
Priya Hemenway
1402735227
October 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
The number Phi, simply defined, is one plus the square root of five, all divided by two. But its myriad occurrences in art, nature, and science have been a source of speculation and wonder for thousands of years. Divine Proportion draws upon both religion and science to tell the story of Phi and to explore its manifestations in such diverse places as the structure of the inner ear, the spiral of a hurricane, the majesty of the Parthenon, and the elusive perfection of the Mona Lisa. A universal key to harmony, regeneration, and balance, Phi is at the heart of a tantalizing story begun on clay tablets in ancient Babylon, and which will continue to be written for centuries to come.
 



Mathematical Physics
Francis Bitter
0486435016
Feb 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
This reader-friendly guide, appropriate for anyone with a grasp of high-school-level mathematics, offers illustrative examples of the rules of physical science and how they were formulated. Author Francis Bitter, a distinguished teacher and inventor, uses direct, nontechnical terms to explain methods of fact gathering, analysis, and experimentation. Topics include the role of mathematics as the language of physics; the nature of mechanical vibrations; harmonic motion and shapes; the geometry of the laws of motion; the geometry of oscillatory motions; and experimental procedures involving magnetic fields, the fields of coils, and coil design. 1963 ed. 60 figures.


Relativity: The Special and the General Theory
Albert Einstein
0517884410
June 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
How better to learn the Special Theory of Relativity and the General Theory of Relativity than directly from their creator, Albert Einstein himself? In Relativity: The Special and the General Theory, Einstein describes the theories that made him famous, illuminating his case with numerous examples and a smattering of math (nothing more complex than high-school algebra). Einstein's book is not casual reading, but for those who appreciate his work without diving into the arcana of theoretical physics, Relativity will prove a stimulating read.

From AudioFile
This version of Einstein's The Meaning of Relativity epitomizes the key difficulty with abridgments: The work becomes a slave to the format. Rather than an alluring example of literature or scholarship, this pivotal...


Quaternions and Rotation Sequences : A Primer with Applications to Orbits, Aerospace and Virtual Reality
J. B. Kuipers
0691102988
August 19, 2002
Paperback
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Review
Alan C. Tribble, author of "A Tribble's Guide to Space" : This is the most complete discussion of quaternions and their applications that I have seen.

Review
[A] splendid book . . . everything one could wish for in a primer. It is also beautifully set out with an attractive layout, clear diagrams, and wide margins with explanatory notes where appropriate. It must be strongly recommended to all students of physics, engineering or computer science.

See all Editorial Reviews


Fourier Series and Orthogonal Functions
Harry F. Davis
0486659739
May 1989
Paperback
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Book Description
This incisive text, directed to advanced undergraduate and graduate students in mathematics, physics and engineering, deftly combines both theory and practical example to introduce and explore Fourier series and orthogonal functions and applications of the Fourier method to the solution of boundary-value problems. 570 exercises.


Five Equations That Changed the World: The Power and Poetry of Mathematics
Michael Guillen
1567314058
July 2000
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Harvard mathematician Guillen looks at five mathematical breakthroughs and the theorists behind them, among them Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Library Journal
Guillen, an instructor in physics and mathematics at Harvard, devotes this work to discussions of five significant equations in physics and the individuals who developed them. The individuals are Issac Newton (universal gravitation), Daniel Bernoulli (hydrodynamic pressure), Michael Faraday (thermodynamics), Rudolf Clausius (thermodynamics), and Albert Einstein (special relativity). Guillen sets their work in the context of the science of their times with accounts that are obviously fictionalized,...


Transport Phenomena, 2nd Edition
R. Byron Bird, et al
0471410772
July 25, 2001
Hardcover
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Book Description
Careful attention is paid to the presentation of the basic theory.
* Enhanced sections throughout text provide much firmer foundation than the first edition.
* Literature citations are given throughout for reference to additional material.


Foundations of Image Science
Harrison H. Barrett, Kyle Myers
0471153001
October 2003
Hardcover
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Review
"...a worthwhile addition to the armamentarium of any serious researcher in image science and will be an opt-quoted reference for many years to come." (Journal of Electrical Imaging, April-June 2005)

In an article whether educational programs for imaging physicists should emphasize science of imaging rather than the technology of imaging, "The new textbook…does appear to be outstanding. It contains over 1500 pages of text, with probably about as many equations...” (Medical Physics, October 2004)

"Foundation of Image Science is comprehensive and the mathematics is rigorous and ubiquitous.” (E-Streams, Vol. 7, No. 5)

“Containing a clear, detailed and general mathematical description of image formation, representation, and quality assessment, this...



A First Course in String Theory
Barton Zwiebach
0521831431
June 2004
Hardcover
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Review
Advance praise: 'A refreshingly different approach to string theory that requires remarkably little previous knowledge of quantum theory or relativity. This highlights fundamental features of the theory that make it so radically different from theories based on point-like particles. This book makes the subject amenable to undergraduates but it will also appeal greatly to beginning researchers who may be overwhelmed by the standard textbooks. Furthermore, all of this is accomplished with great elegance in a single volume.' Professor Michael Green, University of Cambridge
'Barton Zwiebach has written a careful and thorough introduction to string theory that is suitable for a full-year course at the advanced undergraduate level. There has been much demand for a book about string theory at this level, and this one should go a...


The Equation That Couldn't Be Solved: How Mathematical Genius Discovered the Language of Symmetry
Mario Livio
0743258207
September 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The idea of symmetry has been heavily deployed in recent science popularizations to introduce advanced subjects in math and physics. This approach usually backfires—mathematical symmetry is much too difficult for most laypeople to understand. But this engaging treatise soft-pedals it in a crowd-pleasing way. The title's formula is the "quintic" equation (involving x raised to the fifth power), the analysis of which gave rise to "group theory," the mathematical apparatus scientists use to explore symmetry. Inevitably, the author's attempts to explain group theory and its applications in particle physics and string theory to a general audience fall sadly short, so readers will just have to take his word for the Mozartean beauty of it all. Fortunately, astrophysicist Livio (The Golden Ratio) keeps the hard...


God in the Equation
Corey Powell
0684863499
Aug 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
For thousands of years, science and religion have occupied separate rooms in the house of culture. As science writer Powell points out, though, such a separation is hardly warranted in the modern world, where a new faith that he calls sci/religion captures both the mystical and the empirical. The prophet of sci/religion, Powell claims, is Einstein, whose search for a unifying factor in his relativity theory brought together the elements of physics and metaphysics. Einstein believed that a spirit vastly superior to the spirit of man is manifest in the laws of the universe, and he named this spirit Lamda. His Lamda principle became known as the cosmological constant, a force that dominated the universe and mitigated the inward pull of gravity. In this lively story, Powell traces the rise of the scientific...


Using and Understanding Mathematics : A Quantitative Reasoning Approach (3rd Edition)
Jeffrey Bennett, William L. Briggs
0321227735
February 17, 2004
Hardcover
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About the Author

Jeffrey O. Bennett's academic home is the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he has been teaching on and off since 1983 and from which he received his Ph.D. in Astrophysics in 1987. During this time, he's taught more than 50 college courses in subjects including mathematics, astronomy, physics, environmental science, and science education. He began work on Using and Understanding Mathematics because he is particularly interested in helping students overcome difficulties with mathematics. For similar reasons, he has recently completed a textbook for introductory astronomy (The Cosmic Perspective, with M. Donahue, N. Schneider, and G.M. Voit, Addison Wesley Longman, 1999).

He is also working on several books about mathematics and science for the general public. In addition, he is now working on science...



Fundamentals of Statistical and Thermal Physics
Frederick Reif
0070518009
June 1965
Hardcover
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Statistics: A First Course
Donald H. Sanders, Robert K. Smidt
0072295473
October 1999
Hardcover
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Book Description
Written for introductory statistics courses found in departments of mathematics, business, social science, and educational two and four year schools. High-school algebra is the only prerequisite. Statistics: A First Course is written in an informal style without omitting the more difficult concepts. Sanders utilizes an intuitive presentation that encourages students to use a common sense approach to data analysis. Over 2100 problems drawn from health care, business and economics, the social and physical sciences, engineering, education, and leisure activities demonstrate the wide range of questions that can be answered with the help of statistical analysis techniques. To enhance the appeal and readability of the text, scores of minicases, STATISTICS IN ACTION, are found in the margins. These minicases provide examples...

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