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American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer
Kai Bird
0375726268
April 2006
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In American Prometheus, Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin delve deep into J. Robert Oppenheimer's life and deliver a thorough and devastatingly sad biography of the man whose very name has come to represent the culmination of 20th century physics and the irrevocable soiling of science by governments eager to exploit its products. Rich in historical detail and personal narratives, the book paints a picture of Oppenheimer as both a controlling force and victim of the mechanisms of power.

By the time the story reaches Oppenheimer's fateful Manhattan Project work, readers have been swept along much as the project's young physicists were by fate and enormous pressure. The authors allow the scientists to speak for themselves about their reactions to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, avoiding any sort of preacherly tone...



A Different Universe
Robert Laughlin
046503828X
Mar 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In the search for a "theory of everything," scientists scrutinize ever-smaller components of the universe. String theory postulates units so minuscule that researchers won't have the technology to detect them for decades. Stanford physics professor Laughlin, awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize for Physics, argues that smaller is not necessarily better. He proposes turning our attention instead to emerging properties of large agglomerations of matter. For instance, chaos theory has been all the rage of late with its speculations about the "butterfly effect," but understanding how individual streams of air combine to form a tornado is almost impossible. It's easier and more efficient, says Laughlin, to study the tornado. Laws and theories follow from collective behavior, not the other way around, and if we try to analyze...


Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time
Dava Sobel
0140258795
October 1996
Paperback
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Amazon.com
The thorniest scientific problem of the eighteenth century was how to determine longitude. Many thousands of lives had been lost at sea over the centuries due to the inability to determine an east-west position. This is the engrossing story of the clockmaker, John "Longitude" Harrison, who solved the problem that Newton and Galileo had failed to conquer, yet claimed only half the promised rich reward. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly
This look at the scientific quest to find a way for ships at sea to determine their longitude was a PW bestseller for eight weeks. Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

See all Editorial Reviews


The End of Time
Julian B. Barbour
0195145925
Nov 2001
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Where does the time go? Independent physicist Barbour presents an unusual alternate to the standard way of viewing the four-dimensional universe (three spatial dimensions and time), beginning with how our perception of time is formed. Time, he says, does not exist apart from events: the motions of the sun and the stars, the mechanical movement of a clock. Rather than truly feeling the passing of time, we merely note changes in our surroundings, described by the author as a series of "Nows," like frames of a motion picture. Not only do Nows exist for the events that actually occur, but a large number of Nows represent alternate possibilities, inhabiting a land called Platonia. Which Nows become our perceived reality? The rule of thumb Barbour gives is, "only the probable is experienced." In the "macro" world, the...


Longitude: The True Story of a Lone Genius Who Solved the Greatest Scientific Problem of His Time
Dava Sobel
0802714625
October 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“A simple tale, brilliantly told.”  —Washington Post Book World

“A gem of a book.” —The New York Times

“As much a tale of intrigue as it is of science…for anyone interested in history, geography, astronomy, navigation, clockmaking, and—not the least—plain old human ambition and greed.”  —Philadelphia Inquirer

“Intricate and elegant…No novelist could improve on the elements of Dava Sobel’s Longitude.”  —Newsweek


Time's Arrow and Archimedes' Point
Huw Price
0195117980
Dec 1997
Paperback
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Midwest Book Review
Price uses the viewpoint of Archimedes, an ancient mathematician who believed it essential to gain distance from a problem in order to get fresh insights, to theorize on time and the interplay between physicists, philosophers and their theories. Physics overviews blend with a critical survey of contemporary scientists' findings to provide a lively yet scholarly discourse. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description
Why is the future so different from the past? Why does the past affect the future and not the other way around? What does quantum mechanics really tell us about the world? In this important and accessible book, Huw Price throws fascinating new light on some of the great mysteries of modern
physics, and...


A World Without Time: The Forgotten Legacy of Godel and Einstein
Palle Yourgrau
0465092934
December 2004
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
What if time is only an illusion, if it doesn't actually exist? Yourgrau, a Brandeis professor of philosophy, explains that Einstein's general theory of relativity may allow for this possibility, first realized by the great logician Kurt Gödel. Gödel is best known for his incompleteness theorem, one of the most important theorems in mathematical logic since Euclid. In a typically brief paper written for a Festschrift to honor his friend and Princeton neighbor Einstein, Gödel theorized the existence of what have come to be called Gödel universes: rotating universes in which time travel is possible. But if one can travel through time, how can time as we know it exist in these other universes, since the past is always present? And if time doesn't exist in other universes, then it may not exist in...


Space, Time, Matter, and Form
David Bostock
0199286868
Apr 2006
Hardcover
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Book Description
Space, Time, Matter, and Form collects ten of David Bostock's essays on themes from Aristotle's Physics, four of them published here for the first time. The first five papers look at issues raised in the first two books of the Physics, centered on notions of matter and form; the latter five
examine themes in the remaining books, including infinity, place, time, and continuity. Bostock's many insights will be welcomed by all scholars of ancient philosophy.


A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes
Stephen Hawking
0553380168
September 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
Stephen Hawking, one of the most brilliant theoretical physicists in history, wrote the modern classic A Brief History of Time to help nonscientists understand the questions being asked by scientists today: Where did the universe come from? How and why did it begin? Will it come to an end, and if so, how? Hawking attempts to reveal these questions (and where we're looking for answers) using a minimum of technical jargon. Among the topics gracefully covered are gravity, black holes, the Big Bang, the nature of time, and physicists' search for a grand unifying theory. This is deep science; these concepts are so vast (or so tiny) as to cause vertigo while reading, and one can't help but marvel at Hawking's ability to synthesize this difficult subject for people not used to thinking about things like alternate dimensions. The...


The Physics of Time Reversal
Robert Green Sachs
0226733319
Oct 1987
Paperback
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Book Description
The notion that fundamental equations governing the motions of physical systems are invariant under the time reversal transformation (T) has been an important, but often subliminal, element in the development of theoretical physics. It serves as a powerful and useful tool in analyzing the structure of matter at all scales, from gases and condensed matter to subnuclear physics and the quantum theory of fields. The assumption of invariance under T was called into question, however, by the 1964 discovery that a closely related assumption, that of CP invariance (where C is charge conjugation and P is space inversion), is violated in the decay of neutral K mesons. In The Physics of Time Reversal, Robert G. Sachs comprehensively treats the role of the transformation T,...


Being and Time: A Translation of Sein und Zeit (SUNY Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
Martin Heidegger
0791426785
January 1996
Textbook Paperback
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Book Review
Martin Heidegger paved the road trod on by the existentialists with the 1927 publication of Being and Time. His encyclopedic knowledge of philosophy from ancient to modern times led him to rethink the most basic concepts underlying our thinking about ourselves. Emphasizing the "sense of being" (dasein) over other interpretations of conscious existence, he argued that specific and concrete ideas form the bases of our perceptions, and that thinking about abstractions leads to confusion at best. Thus, for example, "time" is only meaningful as it is experienced: the time it takes to drive to work, eat lunch, or read a book is real to us; the concept of "time" is not.

Unfortunately, his writing is difficult to follow, even for the dedicated student. Heidegger is best read in German: his neologisms and other wordplay strain...



Real-Time Physics
David R. Sokoloff
0471129658
Jan 1998
Paperback
·
 
The publisher, John Wiley & Sons
This computer-based lab manual contains experiments in mechanics, thermodynamics, E&M, and optics using hardware and software designed to enhance readers' understanding of calculus-based physics concepts. It uses an active learning cycle, including concept overviews, hypothesis-testing, prediction-making, and investigations.


Hiding in the Mirror: The Mysterious Allure of Extra Dimensions, from Plato to String Theory and Beyond
Lawrence M. Krauss
0670033952
October 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
There are few scientific ideas as captivating as the notion that our universe might have other dimensions than the three (plus time) that we experience. Physicist Krauss offers an erudite and well-crafted overview of the role multiple dimensions have played in the history of physics. This isn't an easy book, even with a writer as talented as Krauss (whom some will recognize as the author of The Physics of Star Trek and Beyond Star Trek) serving as one's Virgil. Long on science and short on its connections with culture, the book is essentially an introduction to the physics and mathematics of extra dimensions with a few more or less disconnected chapters that touch on how these ideas show up in art and popular culture; there's more on brane-world and the ekpyrotic universe than on Plato's cave, whose inhabitants...


Real Time Physics Module 1
David Sokoloff
0471487708
Jan 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Description
Laboratory manual offers experiments in mechanics, thermodynamics, electric circuits, and optics. Includes pre-lab preparation sheets and homework designed to reinforce critical concepts and skills. For undergraduate students. Three-hole punched, with perforated pages.

Book Info
Laboratory manual offers experiments in mechanics, thermodynamics, electric circuits, and optics. Includes pre-lab preparation sheets and homework designed to reinforce critical concepts and skills. For undergraduate students. Three-hole punched, with perforated pages.


Warped Passages: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Universe's Hidden Dimensions
Lisa Randall
0060531088
August 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
The concept of additional spatial dimensions is as far from intuitive as any idea can be. Indeed, although Harvard physicist Randall does a very nice job of explaining—often deftly through the use of creative analogies—how our universe may have many unseen dimensions, readers' heads are likely to be swimming by the end of the book. Randall works hard to make her astoundingly complex material understandable, providing a great deal of background for recent advances in string and supersymmetry theory. As coauthor of the two most important scientific papers on this topic, she's ideally suited to popularize the idea. What is absolutely clear is that physicists simply do not yet know if there are extra dimensions a fraction of a millimeter in size, dimensions of infinite size or only the dimensions we see....


Real Time Physics Module 2
David Sokoloff
0471487716
Feb 2004
Paperback
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Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension
Michio Kaku
0385477058
February 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
How many dimensions do you live in? Three? Maybe that's all your commonsense sense perception perceives, but there is growing and compelling evidence to suggest that we actually live in a universe of ten real dimensions. Kaku has written an extraordinarily lucid and thought-provoking exploration of the theoretical and empirical bases of a ten-dimensional universe and even goes so far as to discuss possible practical implications--such as being able to escape the collapse of the universe. Yikes. Highly Recommended.

From Publishers Weekly
Since ingesting Einstein's relativity theory 50 years ago, physics fell down a quantum rabbit hole and, ever since, physicists' reports to the world of popular science have been curiouser and curiouser. This version, from the author of the graduate...


Real Time Physics Module 1 Mechanics W/Rtp Module 2 Heat & Thermodynamics Rtp Module 3 & Rtp Module 4 Set
Sokoloff
0471684368
Feb 2004
Paperback
·
 
The publisher, John Wiley & Sons
This computer-based lab manual contains experiments in mechanics, thermodynamics, E&M, and optics using hardware and software designed to enhance readers' understanding of calculus-based physics concepts. It uses an active learning cycle, including concept overviews, hypothesis-testing, prediction-making, and investigations. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.


Space and Time in Contemporary Physics
Moritz Schlick
0486442837
Jan 2005
Paperback
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Book Description
An authoritative early exposition of relativity theory, this reader-friendly book describes the physical doctrines of the special and general theories of relativity in terms of their philosophic significance. A clear, nonmathematical introduction to a complex subject, this outstanding work offers a coherent and informative overview to undergraduate students and teachers of philosophy and science as well as to any reader with an interest in Einsteinian physics.


The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality
Brian Greene
0375412883
February 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
As a boy, Brian Greene read Albert Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus and was transformed. Camus, in Greene's paraphrase, insisted that the hero triumphs "by relinquishing everything beyond immediate experience." After wrestling with this idea, however, Greene rejected Camus and realized that his true idols were physicists; scientists who struggled "to assess life and to experience the universe at all possible levels, not just those that happened to be accessible to our frail human senses." His driving question in The Fabric of the Cosmos, then, is fundamental: "What is reality?" Over sixteen chapters, he traces the evolving human understanding of the substrate of the universe, from classical physics to ten-dimensional M-Theory.

Assuming an audience of non-specialists, Greene has set himself a daunting task: to explain...


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