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Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Gardner Dozois (Editor)
0312089260
February 1993
Paperback
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From Library Journal
This how-to book is divided into four parts: "Storytelling," "Ideas and Foundations," and two sections on mechanics, markets, and dealing with editors. Issac Asimov wades in rather superficially on "Plotting," "Dialog," and "Revisions," but Poul Anderson's almost technical essay on preparing a scientifically valid world couldn't be better, and Hal Clement's piece on peopling such a world is just as good. Norman Spinrad uses the techniques of futurists to model how space colonization could occur and provides graphs for the beginner. The tilt here is toward "hard" science fiction, but Jane Yolen's meditation on fantasy, "Turtles All the Way Down," is lyrical and even moving in its reverence for the past. Connie Willis writes about comedy and Stanley Schmidt, amusingly, about cliches. The market listings are...


How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy
Orson Scott Card
158297103X
September 2001
Paperback
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Book Description
Finally, Orson Scott Card's Hugo award-winning classic on the art and craft of writing science fiction and fantasy is available in paperback! Card provides invaluable advice for every science fiction and fantasy writer interested in constructing stories about people, worlds and events that stretch the boundaries of the possible...and the magical. They'll learn: * what is and isn't science fiction and fantasy, and where their story fits in the mix * how to build, populate, and dramatize a credible, inviting world readers will want to explore * how to use the MICE quotient--milieu, idea, character and event--to structure a successful story * where the markets are, how to reach them and get published There's no better source of information for writers working in these genres. This book will help them effectively produce...


Writing Fantasy and Science Fiction
Lisa Tuttle
0713658533
Jan 2002
Paperback
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Bergdorf Blondes
Plum Sykes
0641701748

Paperback
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Fairyopolis: A Flower Fairy Journal
Cicely Mary Barker
0723257248
October 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
Do you believe in fairies? Protected and hidden by a society of Fairy lovers for over 80 years the secret fairy journal of Cicely Mary Barker is available for the first time ever to the public. Learn what really happened during that magical Summer of 1920 when Cicely Mary Barker discovered the secret world of the Flower Fairies.


Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy
Crawford Kilian
1551801892
Nov 1998
Paperback
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Capital Parent, March 2001
...takes readers from understanding the genre to reaching the published stage...section on "craft of writing" is particularly detailed.

Book Description
- Learn how to get the science and the magic right - Develop believable fantasy worlds - Challenge your readers’ imagination - Written by a successful novelist

See all Editorial Reviews


Firebirds Rising: An Anthology of Original Science Fiction & Fantasy
Sharyn November (Editor)
0142405493
April 2006
Hardcover
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From School Library Journal
Grade 7 Up-Imagine that Archeoptrix, the prehistoric link between birds and dinosaurs, had evolved into the dominant life-form on a planet. In Carol Emshwiller's Quill, representatives of that planet have secretly crashed on Earth and begun interbreeding with humans. In Kelly Link's The Wizards of Perfil, an orphan boy and his caustic cousin, both dirt poor and gifted with unusual psychic powers, are bought by a strange man to serve the awesome and forbidding wizards of Perfil, only to learn after difficult trials and life-changing tragedies that they are the wizards. In Kara Dalkey's near-future Hives, cell phones can beam and receive messages without external sound. The phones are highly addictive and used by high school girls to connect ultra-exclusive cliques. A former-addict-turned-girl-detective gets...


Writing Science Fiction and Fantasy Television
Joe Nazzaro
1840233834
Dec 2002
Paperback
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Screentalk magazine, May/June 2002
A joy to read ... Simply one of the best and most-revealing collections of interviews with writers I have read yet.

TV Zone Magazine
"Interesting, informative and sometimes revealing"

See all Editorial Reviews


Magyk
Angie Sage
0060577312
March 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Fantasy fans on the younger side of Harry Potter will find a good jolt of action, mystery and humor in Corduner's light and swift reading of this magyk-filled adventure. Infants switched at birth, spell casting, Brownies, boggarts, dastardly villains and wizards add lively scenery and action throughout. Though a broad cast of characters threatens to become unwieldy, Sage's smooth storytelling pace and Corduner's assured, inviting voice keep things on track. Sharp listeners will have young Septimus Heap's fate (and that of Jenna, adopted by his family) figured out before recording's end, but will still enjoy the ride. And since Septimus is the gifted-by-birthright seventh son of a seventh son, and this is the first in a planned trilogy, listeners are left with the anticipation of more to come. Ages 9-up (Apr.)...


Meditations on Middle-Earth
Karen Haber
0312302908
Oct 2002
Paperback
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Book Review
If you remember where you were when you first read The Hobbit or the Lord of the Rings trilogy, then this collection of essays by some of fantasy and science fiction's most popular authors is worth a look. J.R.R. Tolkien's impact on fantastic fiction--and its writers--is explored in contributions that range from intensely personal expressions of the power and beauty of Tolkien's work to more analytical examinations of his style, language, and influences.

Standouts include Michael Swanwick's thoughtful and powerful meditation on heroism and consequences; Ursula K. Le Guin's analysis of narrative rhythm and language in the trilogy; Terri Windling's moving reflection on an escape from abuse fueled by the power of fairy tales; and Douglas A. Anderson's examination of the critical response to Tolkien's work.

This is...



Apertures
Brian Griffin
0313234280
Mar 1984
Hardcover
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Book Description
The authors believe transitional science fiction writer and critic Brian Aldiss represents the evolutionary leap from the older pulp/adventure science fiction to the post "new wave" genre. They compare his work to that of the early mainstream literary modernists. While science fiction revives the modernist spirit and possesses its ranges, the authors maintain only Aldiss has taken advantage of that potential. His works embody both the potential and contradictions in new wave science fiction. Griffin and Wingrove emphasize the remarkable continuity of Aldiss's work. Neither rebel against the science fiction tradition nor transgressor of literary values, Aldiss is, for the authors, a model of literary survival.


V for Vendetta
Alan Moore
0930289528
April 1995
Paperback
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Book Review
V for Vendetta is, like its author's later Watchmen, a landmark in comic-book writing. Alan Moore has led the field in intelligent, politically astute (if slightly paranoid), complex adult comic-book writing since the early 1980s. He began V back in 1981 and it constituted one of his first attempts (along with the criminally neglected but equally superb Miracleman) at writing an ongoing series. It is 1998 (which was the future back then!) and a Fascist government has taken over the U.K. The only blot on its particular landscape is a lone terrorist who is systematically killing all the government personnel associated with a now destroyed secret concentration camp. Codename V is out for vengeance ... and an awful lot more. V feels slightly dated like all past premonitions do. The original series was black and white and that...


Eldest
Christopher Paolini
0307280721
August 2005
Compact Disc
·
 
Book Review
Surpassing its popular prequel Eragon, this second volume in the Inheritance trilogy shows growing maturity and skill on the part of its very young author, who was only seventeen when the first volume was published in 2003. The story is solidly in the tradition (some might say derivative) of the classic heroic quest fantasy, with the predictable cast of dwarves, elves, and dragons--but also including some imaginatively creepy creatures of evil.

The land of Alagaesia is suffering under the Empire of the wicked Galbatorix, and Eragon and his dragon Saphira, last of the Riders, are the only hope. But Eragon is young and has much to learn, and so he is sent off to the elven forest city of Ellesmera, where he and Saphira are tutored in magic, battle skills, and the ancient language by the wise former Rider Oromis and his...



Writing Horror and the Body
Linda Badley
0313297169
June 1996
Hardcover
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Review
“In this five-chapter study of some manners of "the embodied self" that are emblematic of contemporary anxieties, Badley emphasizes the shifting boundaries of the post-Freudian body and its "archetypal projections."... Badley neatly and effectively integrates her primary and wide-ranging secondary sources; her fine, clear, and admirably set out analyses go beyond genre. [T]his volume is easily recommended for general, contemporary, and specialist collections.”–Choice

Book Description
In this sequel to Film, Horror, and the Body Fantastic, Badley examines horror fiction as a fantastic genre in which images of the body and the self are articulated and modified. Badley places horror fiction in its cultural context, drawing important connections to theories of gender and...


Zen in the Art of Writing: Releasing the Creative Genius within You
Ray Bradbury
0553296345
March 1995
Mass Market Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
As the title suggests, science fiction master Bradbury occasionally sounds like a Zen sage ("You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you"), but for the most part these nine lightweight, zestful essays dispense the sort of shoptalk generally associated with writers' workshops. The title piece aims to help the aspiring writer navigate between the self-consciously literary and the calculatingly commercial. Other essays deal with discovering one's imaginative self; feeding one's muse; the germination of Bradbury's novel Dandelion Wine in his Illinois boyhood; a trip to Ireland; science fiction as a search for new modes of survival; and the author's stage adaptation of his classic novel Fahrenheit 451. Eight poems on creativity round out the volume; noteworthy are "Doing Is Being" and "We Have Our...


Transrealist Fiction
Damien Broderick
0313311218
June 2000
Hardcover
·
 
Review
“The breadth of Broderick's sources is one of the most attractive aspects of this book.”–Choice
“Damien Broderick's Transrealist Fiction: Writing in the Slipstream of Science is another remarkable work of critical analysis produced by Greenwood Press. Beginning with a quote from sci-fi writer and physicist, Rudy Rucker, Broderick lauches the reader on a wonderful exploration of thematic interplay....Broderick is an excellent scholar and his look at the works of Rucker is especially moving. He has a real appreciation for both Rucker's scientific accomplishments and his literary genius.”–Extrapolation

Book Description
Transrealist writing treats "immediate perceptions in a fantastic way," according to science fiction writer and mathematician Rudy...


Sometimes the Magic Works
Terry Brooks
0345465512
Feb 2004
Paperback
·
 
Book Review
In Sometimes the Magic Works, author Terry Brooks mixes advice on writing with stories from his personal experience in publishing. A seasoned fantasy writer with 19 books under his belt, including the New York Times bestseller The Sword of Shannara, Brooks began his second career in middle age when he gave up his law practice to pursue writing full time. His move was fueled by an obsession with writing, ("If I don't write, I become restless and ill-tempered"), inspiration from J.R.R. Tolkien, and constant encouragement from publisher Lester del Rey. Some of Brooks's advice is specific and useful, such as the chapter he dedicates to the importance of outlining. However, the lessons he tries to tell through his own adventures tend to be self-serving. Still, Brooks's experiences could be particularly interesting and valuable to...


Eldest: Inheritance, Book II
Christopher Paolini
037582670X
August 2005
Hardcover
·
 
Book Review
Surpassing its popular prequel Eragon, this second volume in the Inheritance trilogy shows growing maturity and skill on the part of its very young author, who was only seventeen when the first volume was published in 2003. The story is solidly in the tradition (some might say derivative) of the classic heroic quest fantasy, with the predictable cast of dwarves, elves, and dragons--but also including some imaginatively creepy creatures of evil.

The land of Alagaesia is suffering under the Empire of the wicked Galbatorix, and Eragon and his dragon Saphira, last of the Riders, are the only hope. But Eragon is young and has much to learn, and so he is sent off to the elven forest city of Ellesmera, where he and Saphira are tutored in magic, battle skills, and the ancient language by the wise former Rider Oromis and his elderly dragon...


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