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Modern Latin America
Thomas E. Skidmore
019517013X
November 2004
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
Now in its sixth edition, Modern Latin America is a lively interpretive history and the leading text in the field. Thoroughly updated and revised, the book includes a new chapter on the history of Colombia from the wars of independence to the violent conflicts of the present day. It also
examines such topics as:
* the impact of 9/11 on U.S.-Latin American relations
* globalization
* drug trafficking
* women's roles in society and politics
* the fragility and uncertainty of democracy in Latin America

The book features sociocultural sections and boxes in nearly every chapter, covering such diverse areas as the psychology of exile, Santeria in Cuba, baseball in the Dominican Republic, and the popularity of Latin music in the U.S. All political and economic information has been updated. As...


The River of Doubt
Candice Millard
0385507968
Oct 2005
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
In a gripping account, Millard focuses on an episode in Teddy Roosevelt's search for adventure that nearly came to a disastrous end. A year after Roosevelt lost a third-party bid for the White House in 1912, he decided to chase away his blues by accepting an invitation for a South American trip that quickly evolved into an ill-prepared journey down an unexplored tributary of the Amazon known as the River of Doubt. The small group, including T.R.'s son Kermit, was hampered by the failure to pack enough supplies and the absence of canoes sturdy enough for the river's rapids. An injury Roosevelt sustained became infected with flesh-eating bacteria and left the ex-president so weak that, at his lowest moment, he told Kermit to leave him to die in the rainforest. Millard, a former staff writer for National Geographic, nails the...



Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball's Last Hero
David Maraniss
0743217810
April 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. If ever a baseball player were deemed worthy of canonization, right fielder Roberto Clemente might be the one. Jackie Robinson may have suffered greater hardships during his career, but Clemente's nobility, charity and determination make him far more appropriate for a postage stamp than a Nike commercial. After 18 distinguished seasons, the Pirate star with the astonishing throwing arm died in a 1972 plane crash while en route to deliver relief supplies to Nicaraguan earthquake victims. Considering the potential for hagiography, Washington Post staffer and Clinton biographer Maraniss sticks to the facts in this respectful and dispassionate account. Clemente is a deceptively easy subject for a biographer: his acquired halo tinges past events and the accounts of his colleagues (although close...


A Cultural History of Latin America : Literature, Music and the Visual Arts in the 19th and 20th Centuries (The Cambridge History of Latin America)

0521626269


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Review
'The best collaborative history of the region currently available, or likely to be available for a long time to come.' The Times Literary Supplement
'A superb work of reference.' New York Review of Books
'A monument to scholarship ... a tremendous awe-inspiring achievement.' Journal of Latin American Studies

Book Description
A Cultural History of Latin America brings together chapters from Volumes III, IV, and X of The Cambridge History of Latin America. The essays place Latin American literature, music and visual arts in historical context, from the early nineteenth century through the late twentieth century. Topics include narrative fiction and poetry; indigenous literatures and culture; the development of music, sculpture, painting, mural art, and architecture; and the...


The Path Between the Seas
David McCullough
0671244094
Jan 1978
Paperback
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Book Review
On December 31, 1999, after nearly a century of rule, the United States officially ceded ownership of the Panama Canal to the nation of Panama. That nation did not exist when, in the mid-19th century, Europeans first began to explore the possibilities of creating a link between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the narrow but mountainous isthmus; Panama was then a remote and overlooked part of Colombia.

All that changed, writes David McCullough in his magisterial history of the Canal, in 1848, when prospectors struck gold in California. A wave of fortune seekers descended on Panama from Europe and the eastern United States, seeking quick passage on California-bound ships in the Pacific, and the Panama Railroad, built to serve that traffic, was soon the highest-priced stock listed on the New York Exchange. To build...



The Path Between the Seas
David McCullough
0743262131
June 2004
Hardcover
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Book Review
On December 31, 1999, after nearly a century of rule, the United States officially ceded ownership of the Panama Canal to the nation of Panama. That nation did not exist when, in the mid-19th century, Europeans first began to explore the possibilities of creating a link between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans through the narrow but mountainous isthmus; Panama was then a remote and overlooked part of Colombia.

All that changed, writes David McCullough in his magisterial history of the Canal, in 1848, when prospectors struck gold in California. A wave of fortune seekers descended on Panama from Europe and the eastern United States, seeking quick passage on California-bound ships in the Pacific, and the Panama Railroad, built to serve that traffic, was soon the highest-priced stock listed on the New York Exchange. To build...



Guatemala ABCs: A Book About the People And Places of Guatemala (Country Abcs)

1404815708


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Arroz Con Leche: Popular Songs and Rhymes from Latin America
Lulu Delacre
0590418866
April 1992
Paperback
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The Mapmaker's Wife
Robert Whitaker
0385337205
Dec 2004
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
As was customary for girls from elite families in 18th-century colonial Peru, Isabel Gramesón was barely a teenager when she married Jean Godin, a Frenchman visiting the territory as an assistant on a scientific expedition. Planning to bring his wife back to France, Godin trekked across South America to check in with the French colonial authorities, but was refused permission to return up the Amazon back into Spanish territory to retrieve Isabel. So they remained a continent apart for 20 years until 1769, when Isabel started making her way east. Her party ran aground on the Bobonaza River (which feeds into the Amazon), and though almost everyone perished, she managed to survive alone in the rainforest for weeks. Although science journalist Whitaker doesn't directly refer to his own modern trek following...


Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America
John Charles Chasteen
0393927695
October 2005
Paperback
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Book Review
Made up of 20 very different countries, Latin America has sometimes been treated as though it were a homogeneous unit, one mired in poverty and political instability. University of North Carolina scholar John Charles Chasteen's sweeping history of the region imparts a sense of how diverse--ethnically, linguistically, culturally--Latin America truly is, and of how that part of the world is rapidly changing, mostly for the better. (For example, he writes, "in 1980 most governments of the region were dictatorships of various descriptions. In 2000, elected governments rule almost everywhere.")

Chasteen observes that, although Latin America came into being under the imperial aegis of a few European powers, principally Spain and Portugal, it quickly branched into sometimes conflicting regions with widely differing ideas of...



Back on the Road
Ernesto Che Guevara
0802139426
Oct 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This second volume of travel diaries by revolutionary icon Guevara (after Motorcycle Diaries) shows the 25-year-old rebel wandering around South America in the latter half of 1953, bopping from country to country before settling in Guatemala, where a leftist government led by Jacobo Arbenz had just come into power. In his diaries and letters home to his mother, Guevara writes of his ambivalence about the Communists (he doesn't want to join, because it would keep him from traveling to Europe) and how his desire to help out in Guatemala is impeded by near-crippling bouts of asthma. After the CIA overthrows the government in 1954, Guevara makes his way to Mexico, where, over the next two years, his radicalization becomes complete. The diary lacks explicit transitions, however, so the days blur into one...


Open Veins of Latin America: Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent
Eduardo Galeano
0853459916
January 1997
Textbook Paperback
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Language Notes
Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Spanish


The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoir
Fernando Cardoso, Bill Clinton (Preface)
1586483242
March 13, 2006
Hardcover
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From Publishers Weekly
Cardoso, who served as Brazil's Finance Minister in the early 1990's and then president from 1995 to 2002, shows in his first-rate memoir how far his country has traveled in the 125 years since Emperor Dom Pedro. Cardoso appears, by virtue of being a third-generation politician raised in an upper-middle-class household, to have been minted for the presidency. Yet, as he describes with the panache of a seasoned history writer, privilege did not obscure his vision of Brazil's injustice and poverty: he was born into a time of upheaval and worker revolts and lived through his first coup at age six, a foreshadowing of the tumult he would witness throughout his adult life. This philosopher-turned-politician gives a thorough history of 20th century Brazil, a country blessed with resources but racked by instability and...


The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aztec & Maya
Charles Phillips
0754814890
Feb 2005
Hardcover
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Book Description
This book offers enthralling insights into the history, mythology legends of the peoples of Mesoamerica, lavishly illustrated throughout.


Americas: The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean
Peter Winn
0520245016
January 2006
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Balanced and wide-ranging, this companion volume to a PBS TV series uses a thematic rather than an encyclopedic approach to examine the 33 countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. Winn, the academic director of the series and professor of history at Tufts University, ably integrates the PBS team's reportage with current scholarship in seven disciplines, ranging from anthropology to economics to sociology. After canvassing the legacies of the European conquerors, Winn examines issues of national identity and economic development by focusing on Argentina. He looks also at the uneven results of development under the Brazilian military. Other discussions survey internal migration, the role of indigenous peoples, the complexity of race relations and the treatment of women. Concluding chapters address U.S....


Chavez: Venezuela and the New Latin America
Hugo Chavez
1920888004
August 2004
Paperback
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Book Description
Chavez is interviewed by Aleida Guevara, expressing a fiercely nationalist vision for Venezuela and a commitment to a united Latin America. He discusses the significance of the military coup against his government in 2002, their new democratic constitution and relations with the US and Cuba.

About the Author
Hugo Chavez is the President of Venezuela. He came to power in a landslide election in 1998 and was subsequently reelected. He survived a military coup in April 2002 when he was forcibly detained and faced execution.


Rain of Gold
V¿ctor E. Villase¿or
038531177X
October 1, 1992
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Novelist ( Macho ) and screenwriter Villasenor recounts the adventures and struggles of three generations of his family in this earthy Mexican American saga. His father, Juan Salvador, who fled a Mexico torn by revolution, was imprisoned at the Arizona state penitentiary at age 12 for stealing $6 worth of ore from the mine where he worked. He escaped. The author's mother, Lupe, was born in an exploitative U.S.-run gold mine in Mexico, where her brother was narrowly saved from hanging by their gutsy mother, a Yaqui Indian. Juan and Lupe bought a pool hall in the barrio of Carlsbad, Calif., the year Prohibition ended. Villasenor is a born storyteller, and this Latino Roots , though marred at times by sentimentality and cliches, is a gripping, inspirational epic full of wild adventure, bootlegging, young love,...


Hugo Chavez
Richard Gott
1844675335
Aug 2005
Paperback
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Foreign Affairs
Gott is always an interesting, well-informed, and engaging writer.

Financial Times
A colorful and readable account of Chávez's background and beliefs.

See all Editorial Reviews


Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life
Jon Lee Anderson
0802135587
April 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
Even to those without Marxist sympathies, Che Guevara (1928-67) was a dashing, charismatic figure: the asthmatic son of an aristocratic Argentine family whose sympathy for the world's oppressed turned him into a socialist revolutionary, the valued comrade-in-arms of Cuba's Fidel Castro and a leader of guerilla warfare in Latin America and Africa. Journalist Jon Lee Anderson's lengthy and absorbing portrait captures the complexities of international politics (revolutionary and counter); his painstaking research has unearthed a remarkable amount of new material, including information about Guevara's death at the hands of the Bolivian military. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal
Although Ernesto "Che" Guevara was captured and...


Early Latin America: A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil
James Lockhart
0521299292
January 1983
Textbook Paperback
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Book Description
This book provides a general history of Latin America in the period between the European conquest and the gaining of independence by the Spanish American countries and Brazil (approximately 1492 1825). It is both an introduction for the student at the college level and a provisionally updated synthesis of the quickly changing field for the more experienced reader. The authors' aim is not only to treat colonial Brazil and colonial Spanish America in a single volume, something rarely done, but also to view early Latin America as one unit with a centre and peripheries, all parts of which were characterized by variants of the same kinds of change, regardless of national and imperial borders. The authors integrate both the older and the newer historical literature, seeing legal, institutional, and political phenomena within...


The Wheel of Time
Carlos Casteneda
074341280X
Jan 2001
Paperback
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Review
Deepak ChopraCarlos Castaneda is one of the most profound and influential thinkers of this century. His insights are paving the direction for the future evolution of human consciousness. We should all be deeply indebted to him.
The New York Times Book ReviewWe are incredibly fortunate to have Carlos Castaneda's books. Taken together they form a work among the best that the science of anthropology has produced.

Review
The New York Times Book Review We are incredibly fortunate to have Carlos Castaneda's books. Taken together they form a work among the best that the science of anthropology has produced.

See all Editorial Reviews


Diez Deditos and Other Play Rhymes and Action Songs from Latin America
Arranged by Jose-Luis Luis Orozco
014230087X
April 2002
Paperback
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From Booklist
Ages 2-8. The dynamic team that brought readers the popular De Colores (1994) is back with lively finger rhymes and more exuberant songs from Latin America. This new collection will be as treasured as the first book and just as well used. Adults working with children will find many instructional possibilities and curricular connections, and there are ample opportunities to get kids clapping, giggling, wiggling, tickling, and much more. The 34 selections are developmentally appropriate for younger children, but some can also be used with older students. Kleven's rich and vibrant collage illustrations are again wonderfully engaging. This time, she has added visual prompts to cue children to the appropriate body movements for accompanying the songs and rhymes. There are no source notes, but explanatory notes precede...


The Texas Rangers and the Mexican Revolution
Charles H. Harris, III
0826334830
Sept 2004
Hardcover
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Library Journal, October 1, 2004
"Previous accounts…tend to be pro- or anti-Ranger… this balanced and well-written account is recommended for Texas libraries."

Dallas Morning News,November 19, 2004
"Ranger aficionados...will be grateful for [this] insightful revision … This evenhanded account memorializes the daunting complexities of Rangers' effort[s]."

See all Editorial Reviews


Friendly Fire: Losing Friends and Making Enemies in the Anti-American Century
Julia E. Sweig
1586483005
April 5, 2006
Hardcover
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(Jeffrey Goldberg, Washington Correspondent, The New Yorker)
"[A] highly-readable and vigorously-argued book."

(Dana Priest, Washington Post national security correspondent and author of The Mission: Waging War and Keeping Peace with America's Military)
"Lively, thought-provoking…A must-read for scholars, soldiers, policy-makers and pundits engaged in world affairs."

See all Editorial Reviews


Lost City of the Incas
Hiram Bingham
1842125850
Oct 2003
Paperback
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Book Description
A special illustrated edition of Hiram Bingham's classic work captures all the magnificence and mystery of the amazing archeological sites he uncovered. Early in the 20th century, Bingham ventured into the wild and then unknown country of the Eastern Peruvian Andes--and in 1911 came upon the fabulous Inca city that made him famous: Machu Picchu. In the space of one short season he went on to discover two more lost cities, including Vitcos, where the last Incan Emperor was assassinated.


In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex
Nathaniel Philbrick
0141001828
May 1, 2001
Paperback
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Book Review
The appeal of Dava Sobel's Longitude was, in part, that it illuminated a little-known piece of history through a series of captivating incidents and engaging personalities. Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea is certainly cast from the same mold, examining the 19th-century Pacific whaling industry through the arc of the sinking of the whaleship Essex by a boisterous sperm whale. The story that inspired Herman Melville's classic Moby-Dick has a lot going for it--derring-do, cannibalism, rescue--and Philbrick proves an amiable and well-informed narrator, providing both context and detail. We learn about the importance and mechanics of blubber production--a vital source of oil--and we get the nuts and bolts of harpooning and life aboard whalers. We are spared neither the nitty-gritty of open boats nor the sucking of...


Looking for History: Dispatches from Latin America
Alma Guillermoprieto
0375725822
March 2002
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
Guillermoprieto (The Heart That Bleeds: Latin America Now), Latin America correspondent for the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books, presents a collection of essays focusing on Colombia, Cuba and Mexico in the 1990s, accompanied by wonderfully elegant sketches of Eva Per¢n of Argentina and Mario Vargas Llosa of Peru. There is some repetition, but this flaw does not seriously detract from her message that although Latin American political culture in the latter half of the 20th century is largely shrouded in myth, particularly because of its potent relationship with the U.S., it does indeed have "its own independent life." Apparent throughout is the author's ability to capture a historical moment and place it in context: for example, her observations of the pope's visit in January 1998 to a Cuba led by...


The South American Table: The Flavor and Soul of Authentic Home Cooking from Patagonia to Rio de Janeiro, with 450 Recipes
Maria Baez Kijac
1558322493
October 2003
Paperback
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From Publishers Weekly
This authoritative and admirably comprehensive cookbook recalls the seminal work of culinary pioneers Diana Kennedy and Madhur Jaffrey. Assuming the responsibility of introducing specific and authentic South American cuisine to the American cook, Kijac (Cooking with a Latin Beat) offers a thorough volume that is part reference book and part cookbook. Long chapters about the geography of South America and its pre-Columbian civilizations, as well as a history of cooking in South America precede the hundreds of recipes. A glossary of South American ingredients as well as a dictionary of ingredients are included as well. The recipes are wonderful, if overwhelming in number. Beverages such as Cachaca Sour, salads such as Watercress, Lupini Bean and Avocado, and Mariana's Chicken are must-tries. The Condimentos section...


One Hundred Years of Solitude (Oprah's Book Club)
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
0060740450


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Book Review
"Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice."

It is typical of Gabriel García Márquez that it will be many pages before his narrative circles back to the ice, and many chapters before the hero of One Hundred Years of Solitude, Buendía, stands before the firing squad. In between, he recounts such wonders as an entire town struck with insomnia, a woman who ascends to heaven while hanging laundry, and a suicide that defies the laws of physics: A trickle of blood came out under the door, crossed the living room, went out into the street, continued on in a straight line across the uneven terraces, went down steps and climbed over curbs, passed along the Street of the Turks,...



One Hundred Years of Solitude
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Gregory Rabassa (Translator)
0060929790
November 1998
Paperback
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Book Review
"Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice."

It is typical of Gabriel García Márquez that it will be many pages before his narrative circles back to the ice, and many chapters before the hero of One Hundred Years of Solitude, Buendía, stands before the firing squad. In between, he recounts such wonders as an entire town struck with insomnia, a woman who ascends to heaven while hanging laundry, and a suicide that defies the laws of physics: A trickle of blood came out under the door, crossed the living room, went out into the street, continued on in a straight line across the uneven terraces, went down steps and climbed over curbs, passed along the Street of the Turks,...


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